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Mounted and balanced me tires

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Tollster, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. Tollster

    Tollster Jammer Jay

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,082
    Location:
    Pennsyltucky
    I was able to mount and balance my own tires this weekend. I have only done dirt tires in the past so changing these where a real pinic, no bead locks, no tubes, wow..how can this be?
    Anyway after alot of dish soap, checking for tire dots for the light area on tire ( which go towards the valve stem), I got it done.
    As for the balancing, we just used 2 4X4's standing on end about 18" long, then nailed a chunk of 2x10" on the base about 16" long. My neighbor is real good with wood so he slapped it together in no time. We notched the end of the 4x4" so the axle nut would rest in it as we only wanted tha axel to rest in the notch. We spun it a couple of times and marked the tire, seemed as if the valve stem was the heavy area which kept going to the bottom. Added a couple of stick on weights and repeated the process. All worked out great, zipped it up to 95mph today and stable as a rock.
    Important things to do is make sure the tire is plumb in the 4x4's, remove spacers so there is no drag, and be sure you have the sprocket on, and have removed prior weights. Wipe the rim with alcohol soaked rag before sticking on lead weights.
    Get some good spoons for removal and use soap to remove and remount the tire. I did not even need the spoons for the front tire, just used soap and my arms to get it on the rim. Saved some $$ in the process.
    Try it, if you live out in the sticks like I do, its well worth the effort and will more than likely be a better job than your local dealer. I know I put at least 30 minutes in the rear tire balancing as it had a dot on it, so it took more time. Front was done in about 15.
    When you can spin it and it stops in a random place everytime, your good to go.
    #1
  2. Incabiker

    Incabiker Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,050
    Good for you man!! I hear some people use Talcam (sp?) powder in place of soap sometimes, I guess like when you are in the field. I need to learn to balance my tires, I have never done this, just changed the tires - tube. Doesn't sound too hard though.
    #2
  3. Tollster

    Tollster Jammer Jay

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,082
    Location:
    Pennsyltucky
    Its pretty easy, the talc powder is used mostly for not pinching the tube, it helps with the tube placement when you inflate as well. The soap is for sliding the tire off the rim and putting it back onto the rim.
    The balancing was a new pennicle for me as I had never done it before. Although it takes time, because the wheel has to stop rotating, its pretty easy. I want to say it around 15.00-20.00 a tire here fore mounting and balancing. I noticed the last guy left the weights on by the way. I had them at the 6 and 1 oclock positions, and a shit load at that.
    #3
  4. radguzzi

    radguzzi The Journey is the Reward

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,750
    Location:
    North East USA...
    Good for you Tollster... You had good training doing those off road tires with tubes... I live out in the sticks too. Like it that way.
    I have installed me own tires for some time now but too just started balancing for myself... after all this time too. Slow learner I guess. :1drink

    If you plan to keep doing this may I suggest using Ru-Glyde, available at the local parts house. A gallon wll last a long time and there is not as much residue as with the soap which does wash off but remains slippery for longer than I like... just my .02ยข worth.
    Best,
    Rob


    Incabiker,
    I have used talc when installing tubes to keep them from bunching up (like yer underwear... ) If they wrinkle inside the tire this will give them a fighting chance of coming out of instead of staying folded under when you air it up...
    Rob
    #4
  5. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,307
    Location:
    San Francisco
    No need to spin the tire. Start stationary, if it swings back and forth just stop it somewhere near heavy spot at the bottom and let it settle. When the wheel doesn't begin to turn from heavy spot at 4:00, you're close enough. Save a lot of time, and the results are just as good as waiting.
    #5
  6. Tollster

    Tollster Jammer Jay

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,082
    Location:
    Pennsyltucky
    Thanks, I will try that next time.
    #6
  7. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Omnia mea mecum porto Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Oddometer:
    12,860
    Location:
    Tulsa... it's OK
    i've heard a pair of jackstands works well, so no need to fabricate the 2x4 thingy. I'll be trying this over the weekend.

    edit: oh wait. if wheel is off the bike then the bike is already utilizing my jackstands... wood it is.
    #7