My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    Great score on the lift, Ray. Almost identical to my score a couple years ago. I even got the original "manual" with mine! :lol3 Now I'm thinking about getting one of those motorcycle floor jacks for quicker jobs that don't need a lift. Plus my lift is currently occupied with my son's R100 project. First world problems . . .
  2. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    I have one of those floor-jack guys, they're handy for sure!

    This is what a cheap carpenter does:
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    The manual is quite simple: 1. Disassemble 2. Install frame on lift. 3. Re-assemble.
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  3. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    I'm going to build (out of wood) a "project table" for the longer-term project bikes to free up the lift for service and such. It seems more and more bikes find their way into my shop, somehow. :D
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  4. PaulRS

    PaulRS Dutch fool

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    I fabbed a 'project table' out of an old hospital bed frame.

    60 x 220 cm and 36 mm double plywood for platform, heavy duty castor wheels under the lower frame for easy 'get out of the way' when not working on a 'project'
    lifting/lowering by a pot jack mounted in the scissorframe, and fixed at working height by two bolts, blocking the guide wheels in the top rails, I drilled several holes for different heights.

    When not in use it is 20 cm high and fits underneath the storage shelve.

    Paul.
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  5. Arktasian

    Arktasian Lets call it Naturalized

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    Ditto on creative usage of workshop tools.
    I've used Grandma's old kitchen table as a bike lift a few times now. It has a unique black surface that resists oil, probably a building material from the 30's & with storage below.
    Small wonder I'm in that handbasket headed south
  6. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    After working off 'n on over the past few days with the FXRS up on the HF bike lift table, I must grudgingly admit that it is a good thing to have. I hate to think of what it would have taken to change out this nest of vipers with the bike on the floor (and without a center stand of course):

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    These are 26 yr old oil lines that have been in service for 70K miles. I've been sort of worried about them, but never quite had the ambition to change them out. I'm finally trying to make this bike quit leaving puddles of oil on the floor. These hoses were not leaking, but were tied in with what was leaking. The time had come to change them.

    Even with the lift there were some challenges. These 11/16" compression nut fittings were hidden up behind the exhaust header. Even with the header removed, there wasn't a lot to get hold of, and they are very snugly located next to one another.

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    I went looking for a 12 point flare nut wrench, but couldn't find one at the cheap stores. They all had Chinese 6 point wrenches, typically stronger, but they were just plain too fat to fit here, and there was no room to swing a six point wrench far enough to get the next purchase on the nut.

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    AutoZone said there was no such thing as a 12 point flare nut wrench, but it turns out they actually did have one. It was just hiding there as a normal combination wrench that needed some attention with a cutoff wheel.

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    It became a two-fer deal, a short handled 12 point flare nut wrench:

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    And a short handled open end wrench, both of which were very handy to have for this job. I already had a shorty 11/16" open end, but needed this second one too:

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    Do you suppose they might even honor the "guaranteed for life" claim if I turned in both halves?

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    What was actually leaking oil were these seals on the ends of the hard lines. The filter base bolts had worked loose and started vibrating around which mangled the seals. That, plus leaky cylinder base gaskets were making a mess on the floor.

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    The other tool I needed was a pair of Oetiker clamp pliers from Harley Davidson, their part number HD-97087-65B. The Motor Company used to sell these, but then decided that if people had 'em, they might work on their own bikes instead of paying the dealers to do it. There are other ones you can buy, but they are big and clunky and won't fit into most spots where they are needed. There are Harley forums where people like to bitch about this.

    So now, you can't buy the good little pliers, and there are very few Harley techs left who want to (or even know how to) work on an Evo. This is similar to the policy of refusing to sell repair parts to private repair shops, yet not wanting to work on the older bikes in their own dealerships. This alone is reason enough for me to never buy another Harley Davidson Motorcycle, although there are other reasons as well.

    My buddy has a pair from the old days before Harley made them unavailable to the public. He will loan them to me but he won't sell them, even though he is firmly in the BMW camp these days. Oh well, it makes a reason for a nice mcy ride to go borrow or return them.

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    Here are some of the places where they hide those pesky clamps:

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    I cheated on this one, using a long screwdriver:

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    Anyhow, thanks to the lift table, they are in there now. I never would have made it otherwise.

    While I was working on this stuff, Dan, the UPS guy, showed up. He told me this was his last day on our route, and thanked me for all the business I'd given him with BMW parts over the past several years. Lord knows he's been here enough -- we are on a first name basis. :lol3 :lol3

    He brought me this:

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    So, bpeckm, I didn't have to mix metric and SAE on my new lift table. I know I could have just drilled holes in the table for strap hooks, but these M10 x 1.50 forged and zinc plated eye bolts from Grainger Supply (their part number 35Z552) will look more "perfessionul" along the edges of my table. I left the U-bolts to the front, and added three eye bolts spaced evenly from there back, on each side of the table.

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    And this is one of those handy little scissor jacks from eBay that several of my friends have recommended highly for use with the HF table:

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    The little, padded, movable jack screws on top are useful to reach up between the exhaust headers on an Airhead (and assorted other bikes), and contact the frame rails.

    It's actually been a rather pleasant week out in the garage with all my newly found space since the pickup truck is gone.

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    I've read all the posts on here about HF lift tables and wheel chocks, and also about vans set up as motorcycle haulers. I'll eventually replace the wheel clamp on this table, and am also deciding on which wheel chocks I want for inside the E350.

    So, washpark and Jim K, if you don't mind, could you pop in here with some pictures and/or descriptions of how you set up the backs of your E350 vans? A lot of the van threads on here are different from my intended purpose. I don't want to build a house on wheels, just a good way to load and haul maybe two bikes in the back.

    Oh, and Paul, your lift sounds useful as well as creative. Got any pics?


    R100RT, back in the mid 1930's, when your Grandma was using that table for its originally intended purpose, I wonder what she would have thought if she could have seen into the future -- where her table fell into the hands of her yet-to-be born grandson! :lol3 :lol3

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  7. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    With the bike down off the lift, I spent a little time disarming the deadly little corners on the lift itself. There are at least eight of these very sharp corners just waiting to plow a groove into whatever part of the human body passes by.

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    In doing this, I realized that I was using a Chinese cutting wheel in a Chinese cutoff tool to cut Chinese steel off a Chinese bike lift. The air hose and coupling, as well as the air compressor all came from -- you guessed it -- China! Oh, and that eye bolt that I bought from McMaster-Carr showed China as the country of origin.

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    At least this old Heller Bros. NuCut File came from New Jersey. I used it for the final dressing off.

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    Even the ramp had sharp corners, so I cut a radius on those too, and then dabbed on a little paint to maybe stop the rust.

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    I already had a quart of Pittsburgh Paint mixed up to Chinese pinkish red from seven years ago when I was trying to make my HF blast cabinet usable. The paint was still very viable, so I used it.

    The brand name on this Harbor Freight Lift Table is also "Pittsburgh". Unlike the lift, I think the paint really did come from Pennsylvania. I'm considering mixing up some sand in some of this paint, and coating the table top and ramp with it. The diamond plate is slicker than snot. I rolled the bike down off the table with my hand on the brake, but if I tried to apply the brake, the tire just skidded. A partially controlled slide was the order of the day.

    Anybody created a non-skid surface that stays put and actually does the job?
  8. PaulRS

    PaulRS Dutch fool

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    I'd paint it and dust it with a fine grade sand, birdcage sand comes to mind.
    So paint, dust when the paint is still wet, let dry, apply final, thin coat of paint.

    Oh, and no pics of the 'project table', no ongoing project at the moment.

    Paul.
  9. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    Ray - I have not fit-up my van yet for regular bike hauling, but I have a bunch of E-track rattling around back there, just waiting to be attached to the floor and walls. I got it from your favorite vendor :D . I didn't even realized HF sold E-track until I found the clips on a rack by the tie-downs. I had to ask the one employee if they had the track, and it was stocked waaaaay in the back almost at the opposite corner of the store from where the d-ring clips were. I'm NOT planning on installing a fixed wheel chock on the van. Too limiting and inconvenient.

    When I finally get the (other people's) crap out of my van and hang the e-track, I'll post up some pictures.
  10. washpark

    washpark Adventurer Supporter

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    My bikes do not get to ride inside the van, but they always want to come along. I use a Mototote on the receiver hitch which accommodates only one bike at a time. The R90 has been to Yosemite and southern BC. The F800R has been to Morrow Bay and southern BC. Mototote works great, but probably not for Ray since the bike can get wet. I cover the bike if rain is anticipated.
  11. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Jim, I originally thought I wanted one or more wheel chocks in the van for safety, as in preventing the bike(s) from flying through me and a passenger on their way out the windshield in the event of a sudden stop. None of the chocks being sold look substantial enough to help much in that situation. A 400 pound motorcycle in a van that is going 70 mph has a great deal of momentum. A pair of straps on each bike, angled to the rear, would have to handle that chore, and would still likely fail in a crash situation.

    However, in the interest of loading and tying a bike down all by myself, a wheel chock that would hold the bike vertical until I could attach the straps would be helpful. After a lot of reading, I just now ordered a Condor Trailer-Only Chock.

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    I plan to bolt it to the HF lift table and see how that works out. If I don't like it, I will get a VC17 Handy Wheel Vise. A friend has a vise that he is not using, and will let me borrow it to see if I like it.

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    Interestingly, the chock sells for US $194.75 plus shipping on the Condor website, but an eBay seller in Florida has them listed at $139.19 with free shipping. I called Condor this morning and asked them why? They told me that after they sell the chocks to their distributors, those folks can set the price as they see fit. O.K., I ordered from eBay.

    I also spoke with an Engineer at Condor, and asked about tire width. Their site says the chock "will work on front and rear tires from 14" to 22" (diameter) and 80mm to 230mm (width)". My bikes generally have skinny tires. Two of them have front tires that are 81mm and 82mm wide. I asked if they had any narrower cradles. He said no, but that my tires should work just fine.

    My hat is off to you, but I cannot get my mind around using one of those. When I see one on the highway, I either pass the vehicle carrying it, or lay way back from them. I don't want to be in the path of the motorcycle when the hitch breaks off the truck.

    On the MotoTote website, it says:

    "I'm nervous about putting my expensive motorcycle on a hitch mounted carrier. Will my bike be safe on the MotoTote?

    It's understandable to be hesitant about new and unfamiliar things. If you Google the chat rooms and forums, you'll see that, generally, the skepticism is from people who have not tried a MotoTote and the enthusiasts are MotoTote users. In other words: Once you try it, you'll see that the MotoTote is not only the Easiest way to haul your Bike but also COMPLETELY SAFE"
    O.K., I'm one of the people who is skeptical because I have not tried one. I intend to stay firmly in that camp. :lol3 :lol3

    Also, one of the reasons I got the van was to keep the bike(s) inside, out of the weather and away from prying eyes. However, if it works for you, GREAT! You have found a good solution.
  12. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    I like that chock with the removable stop. I thought about using key-hole mounting for a chock so it can be easily removed, and may still do that.

    I have a steel bulkhead behind the front seats which helps with the debris flying forward in a crash, but I doubt that alone would stop a bike. Good straps will with good anchoring, which is why I want the e-track. It will be bolted, not screwed down!
  13. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Some time ago, I had cleaned the rust off the chrome of the Krauser bag rack that used to be on my R90, polished it, and picked up some new stainless steel hardware for it. I took some time this afternoon to install the bags. The rack was still on the bike when I got it, but the bags had been stored in an attic, so they are still in pretty good shape. I left them on just long enough to decide that I like the bike better without them, so they went back into storage. I took a few (not so great) pictures while they were installed, just for my future reference.

    So, why not use them? My objections were:
    • I had to remove those giant red reflectors to install the rack. I spent a lot of time resurrecting those reflectors and I kinda like the way they look.
    • The rack is the early style without the braces running to the pillion pegs, which I have heard is conducive to fracturing the rear subframe.
    • I discovered why a four inch hunk of seat trim was broken out when I got the bike -- it rubs on the rack when the seat is lifted. That trim was nasty to replace and a bit expensive too.
    • The seat won't open till the RH bag is removed. (I know -- you can remove the seat hinges, but I prefer not to do that.)
    • The bags have two locks each; I have two keys; the keys work properly; I don't understand the logic. There are no locks on the latches that hold the bags to the rack.
    • I couldn't find any ROK straps at the local shops. I called several places, and was surprised to find myself explaining what ROK straps are.
    • The rack looks a little busy across the back, and it obscures the R90/6 logo on the back of the seat.
    • I think the bags would look better with stock silencers.
    • They look just a little too much like antique typewriter cases.
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    I'll save the bags anyway. Like the Vetter Fairing and Rainy Day Fender, they are part of the heritage of this old bike.
  14. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    Naked is a good look....







    :1drink
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  15. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Well . . . yeah for a motorcycle! :-)


  16. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    yep... we used to skinny-dipping, now we go chunky-dunking!

    :-)
  17. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    I mentioned last week that I fitted my Krauser bags to see how they looked. I guess I should have left them on. Everybody else had them on for our ride this past weekend. Here were four airheads ready to leave my house last Friday, and I was the only one without side bags!

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    We were headed over to the Vintage Rally at the National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa. The weather was great the first day, except for one little rain shower. We stayed dry though, thanks to our navigator who steered us around the clouds with his ninja-like GPS skills.

    The rain still tried to catch us when we pulled in for a break at a gas station. We weren't buying gas, just drinks and taking a little break. Our navigator, still on the alert, noticed the clouds trying to nail us. His sharp eyes also spotted this:

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    "I guess nobody would care", he said, "if we slid over under the canopy next to that pump that nobody can use anyhow!"

    So . . . we did, and it worked great. The sky opened up right after we moved the bikes.

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    At the next pump, this cherry, highly detailed Cougar, with the scrubbed Mickey Thompson white letter tires, got his gas and headed out into the rain storm. We stayed put and it was only a few minutes till the sun came back out and even dried off the road again.

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    Then, almost before anybody could say "ouch, my butt hurts", we were at the AmericInn across from J&P Cycle in Anamosa. In case you were wondering, this was not a camping trip.

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    The newest bike in the group was this '79 R100S, ridden by advrider inmate junkcollector.

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    Lit67 had his '76 R90/6, a couple years newer than mine.

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    There was also this very nice '78 R100S ridden by our scout, parked here behind my '74 R90/6.

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    Just to vindicate washpark, and his MotoTote on his hitch receiver, I took a picture of this in the parking lot:

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    It's a rather rare Velocette. Here's a closer look at the display plate:

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    So, I guess he wasn't nervous about hauling his bike that way either.

    A view of the back mudguard:

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    We rode to the General Store Pub in Stone City, which is a fantastic place to eat, and sits in a beautiful valley near a huge stone quarry. This place is well worth a visit if you go to the museum.

    Saturday morning, lit67 went down for some coffee and went outside to check the bikes. He later told me that there were people out there taking pictures of our airheads. Imagine that, with all the fancy bikes around. I guess we take our own bikes for granted, and they are a bit unusual to see on the street.

    We headed over to the rally at the National Motorcycle Museum. John Parham, who just recently passed away, left quite a legacy by getting this place going.

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    There was a gentleman there with a Harley trike, pulling a trailer, and accompanied by his Springer Spaniel named Fitzgerald, a most handsome and well-behaved dog who really looked good in his doggles. Sadly I did not get a picture. However, I did get a picture of this Irish Wolf Hound -- the first one I have ever seen:

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    Like Fitzgerald, he was also basking in everybody's attention, and was quite happy to be petted, photographed, and admired. Wow!

    But, there were some bikes there too. Not everything was old. Randy Baxter was there from Marne, Iowa, with some nice samples. He had this Bonneville for sale:

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    He also had this Indian Tomahawk Tribute bike with him, in the form of a Royal Enfield 500 Bullet.

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    I asked him, "So, Royal Enfield built a tribute bike?"

    "Er . . . no", he said. "Actually, Baxter Cycle built a tribute bike." :lol3 :lol3

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    My mistake. They did a very nice job!

    Walking around then:

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    This '66 T120C was also one of Randy Baxter's bikes: :brow

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    Here's that Velocette 350, safely down off its hitch carrier:

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    This '63 Triumph TR6 hill climber, only one year older than my Triumph TR6 street bike, yet built so radically different, just blew me away:

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    I hope I got this right, but owner Jim Todd told me that he campaigned this bike for 45 years till he quit riding it and began showing it. Fourth gear is the only one in the box, which leaves room for the gearbox to hold the oil for the engine instead of having the normal external oil tank. He said the engine comes on the cams from 7,000 to 9,000 rpm! It would take a real man to ride this beast!

    Inside the museum, there is a new area devoted to barn find bikes -- what you might see if you got the chance to get inside the barn of your dreams:

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    I'll wrap it up here. I have so many pictures posted that things are getting a little unsteady. I hope all of this was of interest.

    We rode back home the same day as our walk-around, because a couple of the guys had to get back. The wind was, shall I say, FREAKIN BRUTAL all the way home. Yeah, that describes it pretty well. I also discovered that I really need some new hand grips for my bike. Those eBay knock-offs have zero cushion, and put my hands to sleep almost immediately. Even with padded gloves on, I could barely stand it!

    (But I did have it back out this morning for another 65 miles on a breakfast run). :lol3 :lol3

    Ray
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  18. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    On June 6, I ordered a Condor Wheel Chock from an eBayer in Florida, and at noon on June 7, it was on my front porch (drop shipped from a warehouse next door in Indiana). I'm generally very pleased with it, but I decided to modify the mounting hardware a bit. Here is what they sent:

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    The long, 3/8" bolts and the fender washers would be fine for mounting this chock to a thick, wooden trailer deck, but I don't plan to do that. The idea is to use the bolts, nuts, and washers in the two outside holes in each of two pieces of steel bar to permanently attach the bars to the trailer deck, like this:

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    Then you use these little 5/16" thumbscrews to attach the chock base to the steel bars:

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    To remove the chock and use it elsewhere, like on your lift table, you can then remove the thumbscrews (no tools needed aside from your fingers) and move it. Condor sells extra hardware kits so that you can attach mounting bars wherever the chock may be needed.

    I'm sorry, but these little thumbscrews just don't go with the rest of the picture. They are probably just fine and work well, but they just look way too wimpy for me. They would be the weak link in the chain for sure. I also didn't like the idea of the steel mounting bars going onto my lift table. They would lift the chock 1/4" off the table surface, making a handy place for small parts to escape and hide. They also would just be plain ugly there.

    Why not just drill and tap holes in the table top itself, and dispense with the bars altogether? Well, remember the table top is from Harbor Freight and is made of thin Chinesium (like steel, only softer).

    So, I decided to use the Condor mounting bars as backup strips and permanently install them underneath the table, out of sight. I think this worked out well. I temporarily attached the bars to the chock base with the wimpy little thumbscrews, lined it all up with the table edges, and used it as a template to drill four holes. Although I used M10 x 1.5 metric bolts, a 13/32" drill makes a good clearance hole. This let me reuse the M10 bolts that HF supplied with the table -- originally to mount their crappy little wheel clamp and tire stop.

    I drilled one hole, installed and tightened a bolt and nut and then did the next hole, etc., to make sure things stayed aligned and to keep the hole pattern correct. Then I used the chock and mounting bars as a template to mark the center of the four inner holes (the ones where the wimpy thumbscrews would have originally been used).

    Next, I removed the chock and mounting bars and drilled four more 13/32" clearance holes in the table top. It wound up like this:

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    Next, I drilled the two (threaded) inner holes in each mounting bar to a larger size. I wanted to use M10 hex head bolts here in place of the wimpy 5/16" thumbscrews. Ace Hardware had these M10 bolts in 25mm under-head length, which was just right:

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    The proper tap drill size for an M10 x 1.5 tap is 8.7 mm, but that is within .001" of an 11/32" drill which I already had. So I drilled and lightly chamfered all the holes. I use my grandpa's old brace and bit for a chamfer tool. It's well over 100 years old, but it still works great.

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    Then I hand tapped the M10 x 1.5 thread in the four center holes of the two mounting bars:

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    . . . and bolted the mounting bars underneath the table:

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    It looked like this from the topside:

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    I also had to enlarge the holes in the chock to accept the M10 bolts, so I used the 13/32" bit again for that:

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    . . . and bolted the chock in place on the table:

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    You can see that I kept the front edge of the chock even with the front edge of the table. It may have been better to move it several inches further forward, so that the rear wheel of the bikes would line up more centered (fore & aft) with the table drop-out panel, but I decided that I didn't want the chock hanging off the front where an awkward person (me) could bang into it all the time. It would be easy to adjust this later if it becomes a problem, but I think the drop-out panel will work just fine as is.

    With this setup, I would need to use a 17mm socket to remove the chock from the table, but I can do it all from the topside rather easily. There is no need to reach under the table with another wrench and keep the nuts from turning -- because there are none.

    The only reason why I would ever remove the chock is to mount it in the van. However, if I like the way the chock works for holding a motorcycle, I will probably just buy another chock to leave in the van permanently. I would like for the van to be set up and ready to roll if one of my old bikes breaks down somewhere. My wife could drive the van to come pick me up, but she could not/would not remove the chock from the lift and install it in the van -- nope, uh-uuh, no way!

    So the acid test. I got a buddy to come over and spot me as I rolled the little CL350 Honda into the chock. We started with the adjustment pin in the chock's center hole, as shown in the picture above. All my bikes have 19" tires up front. This hole position works well. The idea is that the cradle should rotate forward as far as possible when the bike rolls in, without touching down onto the bracket.

    The Honda rolled into the chock, and I could let go -- it stood there just fine. It was also pretty easy to pull it back out and get it down off the lift. I would always use two straps in conjunction with the chock, but the bike is secure enough with just the chock to let go of it and then tie on the straps.

    Next, we tried the Harley FXRS. Once my oldest and smallest bike, this is now my newest and biggest bike. Funny how that worked out. Anyway, it works as well with the chock as the Honda did.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    With soft straps over the top of each lower fork slider, the straps running down to the front U-bolts line up very nicely when the front of the chock is aligned with the front of the table. All of this sounds like a lot of fooling around for not much gain, but it really didn't take much time or effort, and it made this old guy happy. I think I can get the bikes on and off the table by myself without much drama, though I think I will still build a small wooden platform the same height as the table when it is fully down. I think it would help to have that to stand on, on the left side of the table, when running a bike on/off the lift.

    I made one other incidental change to the drop-out panel on the table. This thing is prone to slide out of its hole and possibly cause major trouble when rolling a bike on or off the lift. I drilled and countersunk a bolt on each corner of the panel, which stopped that nonsense (not my idea, I read it on here, but forgot who recommended it -- sorry):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I hope this little write-up may be useful to others.

    I give the Condor Chock two thumbs up, and plan to order another one for the E350! :clap
    OdyBandit likes this.
  19. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,386
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    The Condor Chock works really well with the TR6 also, and so does the little scissor jack with the movable jack screws. I was just doing some routine maintenance and inspection, along with a cleanup:

    [​IMG]

    When I got the Triumph down off the lift, I decided to remove the chock from the lift table and install it inside the E350 while the weather was holding nice and cool. Another identical chock from the same eBay seller is due here tomorrow, which will go back onto the lift table.

    Here is the Condor Chock bolted down inside the E350.

    [​IMG]

    I used the exact same method to mount the chock assembly to the van floor as I described in the previous post for putting it onto the HF lift table. So, the steel mounting bars are underneath the floor, acting as backup straps.

    This means I am now on intimate terms with the E350 drive shaft, exhaust heat shield, and fuel tank, all of which were obstacles to the process. One nut and washer needed to go to a spot over the fuel tank that I just could not reach with my fingers. I taped them to a box end wrench and slid them into position as directed by my neighbor who was up inside the van, sighting down through the hole in the floor and calling out directions. When I got the nut and washer aligned with the hole, he got the bolt started from above.

    Of course, I could have used Rivnuts, and avoided slithering around under the van, but the steel bars made for a stronger installation. The front one is under both the floor and the flange of a frame cross-member, while the rear is just under floor material. The floor steel is not really heavy enough for Rivnuts to hold with any strength. The steel bars are 2" x 11", so they spread the force over a relatively large area of the flooring.

    With my mess cleaned up and everything back in place, it looks like this:

    [​IMG]

    The chock is in between the two bucket seats that junkcollector installed when he had the van. You can see the pedestals he had made up, and the rubber matting that he had installed in place of carpet. I removed the seats and partially pulled up the rubber mat to drill the holes in the floor and to install the mounting bolts for the steel straps that are under the floor. Then I laid the rubber matting back down, hiding the bolts we had installed, and put the seats back in place.

    [​IMG]

    The bungee cord is to stop the chock from rattling while driving down the road. The bottom channel made a good place to stash some rolled up tie-down straps.

    The chock is mounted with the nose of the front wheel perch 96 inches from the inside of the rear doors in the van. That leaves about two inches clearance for my FXRS to be in the chock and have the doors closed. That is why the chock had to be positioned such that it extends forward between the rear bucket seats, but it is also why junkcollector ditched the bench seats and put in the bucket seats in the first place.

    The chock is easily removable by taking out the four bolts that hold it to the straps underneath the floor (two of the bolts are visible in the picture above). These bolts run into tapped holes, so there is no need to climb under the van. Each seat can be removed also, by taking out four bolts. That leaves the inside of the van capable of carrying 4' x 8' sheets of plywood, drywall, or whatever. Meanwhile, with the seats and chock installed, the van can seat four people comfortably, and carry my largest bike -- loaded straight up the middle.

    The seat bolts engage the factory Rivnuts that were originally used to mount one of the bench seats. These Rivnuts are all through frame cross-members, so they are very stout.

    When junkcollector had the van, he once had two 60's era Triumphs tied down, one behind each bucket seat, and was still able to close the back doors. There were two more bikes on a trailer behind the van for that trip. It is a versatile vehicle for sure.
  20. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,896
    Location:
    Road Island
    Wow.



    Now just where is that "impressed jealousy/envy" emoticon......??? I'm taking in the vibes and learning from a master.....


    :)