My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    It just plain sucks that YOU have to go through all the trouble of re-posting/re-directing your links cuz some stupid corporation had more desire to "monetize" than empathy for what they had built. We as a "corporate culture" have a helluva lot to learn about what really matters. Greed is NOT good. And winning at any cost is NOT winning.

    As individuals, part of a greater society, we owe it not only to others but to ourselves to think about (and appreciate!) what is best for all, not just what is best for "me."

    :)
  2. washpark

    washpark Adventurer Supporter

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    Very glad you are back. My favorite watched thread. Lots of good information.
  3. Cogswell

    Cogswell Trying to live the new normal.

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    Yep, I had to go back and update all the links in my R100 build, and Colorado ride report. Still working on the Big Bend ride report, then will do the R80ST rebuild thread. It will be nice to leave these threads for others to enjoy and use as reference.
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  4. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Thank you, one and all!

    While it is true that Photobucket sucks, it's like the old saying, "It is better to light one small candle than to curse the darkness". I am sort of enjoying going back over old posts and redoing the links. Each one reminds me of what was going on at the time. Right now, I am working through my TR6R build over on BritBike.com as I get the time.

    Meanwhile, I've had a little fun with the splats that the bucket sprinkled everywhere like bad graffiti. I feel better with each one I replace by restoring the original picture. This little progression reflects my change of attitude . . .

    One day these showed up everywhere:

    [​IMG]

    . . . the infamous CEO:

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    What they really meant to say:

    [​IMG]

    The trash heap of internet history:

    [​IMG]

    I encourage everyone who was affected to go back and fix their pix.

    Ray
  5. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    This afternoon, I took a little ride to visit fellow inmate OdyBandit. I took no pictures, because I was already imposing on him as it was. Just let me say that he lives in Barn Bike Nirvana! Thanks for the visit and the walk-around, Ody!

    When I got home today, the R90 had rolled up a tad under 4,100 miles for the year. So far, things have been pretty much trouble-free for an old bike.

    A while back, I mentioned acquiring a pile of crusty BSA parts. They had come to a friend of mine, who goes by the name, 'Tomahawk'. He got them from a guy he knows who needed money and wanted to clean out his shed. Wisely, Tomahawk decided the stuff was too rough and he didn't have time to deal with it. He called me and I couldn't stop myself from carrying the crap home. You can see the pictures I posted when this happened, back at the end of May -- click here.

    So, a couple weeks ago, Tomahawk called and said that the guy's nephews had scoured around and found some more of the BSA bits. He said, "They're yours -- come and get them if you want, as part of the deal."

    So, of course I did. There were a couple of crank assemblies there, but not exactly in pristine condition:

    [​IMG]

    There was also a 5 gallon bucket with a split in the bottom and a few miscellaneous parts inside. I had already pulled some stuff out of the bucket before I shot this picture:

    [​IMG]

    One part looked like the missing section of rear axle. I cleaned it off a bit, and it threaded right into the wheel. Looking into the bucket, you can see the missing top triple tree, still carrying an old Smith's 150 mph speedometer (broken glass and all). There was also the fork tensioner, top stem nut, handlebar clamps, etc. Once again, after cleaning the threads, this stuff screwed right into place. I had to chase the 5/16-26 threads in the triple tree, but I had the right tap from working on my TR6R.

    I added the stuff to the pile and walked away.

    [​IMG]

    But then I got to thinking that there was probably enough to piece together sort of a roller. I went back and stuck the frame on my bike jack, then started fooling around with the rusty bits.

    Lo and behold, we do have a roller. It is only sitting on the jack because the sidestand lug is currently indisposed -- a typical British bike problem. The ancient made-in-England Dunlops are still holding air and everything!

    [​IMG]


    I now call it the Tomahawk Beeza Choppa Ghost Bike.


    When I look at it, I hear music. Who knows what this old bike has seen and done?:





    Going back through my old TR6R pictures, I see that my TR6R didn't look very much different at one time:

    [​IMG]

    Later, in the same spot on the floor, it turned out O.K.

    [​IMG]

    Is there life after death for this old Beezer? :lol3 :lol3
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  6. globalt38

    globalt38 "A Fist Full of Throttle" Super Supporter

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    Based on you're TR6R results - I'd say definitely! :nod
  7. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

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    Thanks for the visit and kind words and letting me hear that R90 purr. I hope mine turns out half as good as yours. Anyone with an R65 look out, Ray took a liking to mine!
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  8. Geezerrv

    Geezerrv Been here awhile

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    Ray,
    Wanted to say thank you once again for documenting all your work twice! Assembled my good neighbor and friends 1969 R60/2US final drive today. Had to wander around to find the final drive pics and enjoyed several pages of this epic thread again. Not my first FD on a BMW but first /2. The pics are really great and I'm glad I can see them again! Thank You JT
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  9. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^JT, You are more than welcome. I know next to nothing about a /2, so I hope there was some carryover. It was sort of a long slog going through those pictures a second time, but I also kind of enjoyed the "refresher course". I may need it myself sometime. Right now though, my R90 is running great. I had it out all morning, and the more I ride it, the more I enjoy it.

    I appreciate your feedback, and good on you for helping your friend with his R60!
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  10. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    Double the pleasure, double the fun.... we ALL thank you for your efforts. I would have had smoke coming from my ears and expletives floating around between those ears....

    :-)
  11. zzzak

    zzzak Long timer

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    That is a beautiful bike.

    [​IMG]
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  12. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Back in 2001, when Harley first came out with their V-Rod, I remember talking with an old-school tech in the local Harley Shop who was giving me his opinion of the (then) new model. Among other comments, none of them complimentary to the V-rod, I remember him saying that Willie G. Davidson had managed to design a radiator shroud that looked like "Gumby's Coffin". In case you don't know, Gumby was a claymation character who looked like this:

    [​IMG]

    I thought his description was pretty accurate. After that, whenever I saw a V-Rod, I couldn't help but think of Gumby. Mercifully, 2017 is the final year of the V-Rod!

    Anyway, that was running through my mind last week, as I was doing a little wood butchering. What I built looks even more like Gumby's coffin than one of those V-Rod shrouds. I made two of them:

    [​IMG]

    These are your basic wooden box, made of cheap grade 1x8 and 1x10 lumber. The 1x8 forms the sides, ends, and internal blocking. I used the 1x10 boards for the tops. One box is upside down in the picture to show the way it is built.

    These boxes are the same length as my Harbor Freight lift table, and approximately the same height. They are made with crude, butt-joint construction, using no dadoes or rabbits, but I did slather on some wood glue wherever two pieces met, and used 6d finishing nails along with the glue to hold it all together.

    The boxes are sturdy and strong, yet relatively lightweight. They are easy to pick up and move since I left a 3/4" overhang around all the top edges. So -- what exactly is their purpose?

    Well, call me a wimp, but I found that I was very uncomfortable rolling bikes up and down on/off the bike table. Whenever I roll a bike around by hand, I keep it tilted slightly toward me for better control. That just won't work with the Condor Chock at the front of the table. The bike needs to be straight up and down to enter the chock correctly. Otherwise it gets jammed in there at an angle and feels like it is going down.

    If I were taller and stronger, I could run alongside the ramp while keeping the bike vertical. I just can't do that without feeling like the bike is going to fall away from me. I don't want to take that chance!

    I decided that I would be more comfortable riding the bike up the ramp, onto the lift, and into the chock, but I wanted to be able to paddle-foot along the way to keep the bike vertical. The boxes work just great for that purpose, and in several other ways as well. Here are some pictures:

    It works out well to offset the boxes halfway down the length of the table. As I am astride the bike and the front wheel is about to start up the ramp, I can easily place my feet onto the leading ends of the boxes:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When the front wheel is in the chock, my feet are not quite to the other end of the boxes.

    The Condor Chock holds the bike well enough to get off the bike and add a couple of straps. When the bike is lifted, I find that by stacking the boxes one on top of the other they make a full length bench at a very comfortable seating level. That gives good access to the bike along the full length of one side.

    [​IMG]

    Once I had the boxes built, I made the maiden voyage up the ramp with the little Honda to see how it worked. It was easy, so I went ahead and put the R90/6 up there. Again -- easy!

    [​IMG]

    It was just as easy walking it back down. Here, the eagle has landed:

    [​IMG]

    I don't have any extra space, so I was reluctant to add these boxes to my garage. I sort of got around that by making them wide enough to work, yet narrow enough to stack on top of the lift table when not in use. That way, they don't take up any additional floor space:

    [​IMG]

    The R90/6 has run up 5,000 miles since the first startup back on March 22 of this year, so I put it up in the air and did some maintenance work. Other than checking oil and drivetrain lube, and monitoring tire pressure, I had not done anything to the bike since the 770 mile marker.

    Back then, I had set the valves at .10mm (.004") intake, and .15mm (.006") exhaust. Several people told me that was too close, and didn't leave any room for error if any valve recession occurred. But . . . after re-torquing the heads, and checking the valve clearance again, they hadn't moved. Just to play it safe, I went ahead and set them to .15mm (.006") intake and .20mm (.008") exhaust this time around. Rappy tappets are happy tappets, so the saying goes, and loud tappets save lives!

    I changed the engine oil and filter, and cut open the old filter media, but found nothing unusual there. I also changed the transmission, driveshaft, and final drive oils. There was some very fine fuzz on the magnetic drain plug for both the transmission and the final drive, but no chunks.

    A couple weeks ago, when I fired up the bike to ride home after dark, I discovered that my speedo light was burned out. The high beam indicator had gone some time ago, but I could live with that (actually without that). The speedo is another story.

    These are the original, 43 yr old bulbs. I was going to change them all out when I had the pod apart, but I was advised that if they still work, then leave them alone. Don't chance breaking the plastic film!

    So, I've had a KATDASH unit on the shelf for a while now. I was holding it for a winter job, but went ahead and did it now. I just laid out the stuff along my new wooden bench -- cup of coffee, tablet showing the instructions on the KATDASH site, and then the real thing directly behind the tablet. Kat's directions are well written and easy to follow. There was still plenty of room for me to sit, straddling the bench while working on the pod:

    [​IMG]

    I had opted for the gasket set that she sells, so I put that in too, although my old ones were not all that bad. Her directions again were clear and easy to follow. Removing the old adhesive residue from the T-shaped cover probably took the longest of any part of this job:

    [​IMG]

    One place where I deviated from the directions was in testing the unit before I put it back on the bike. Back when I had this apart before, I made up a little table to show which pins went with each light. I had included that earlier in this thread (click the link, then scroll down a little to find the table), and then replaced it after P-bucket wiped it out, so I ran that up on my tablet and used my test battery to check my new LED's. Here, I was verifying the high beam indicator:

    [​IMG]

    My picture of the harness plug was handy too, despite the fact that P-bucket didn't find any value in it and deleted the link (may they soon cease to exist as a corporate entity):

    [​IMG]

    This also let me test the brake failure light without removing the fuel tank and unscrewing the cap from the master cylinder:

    [​IMG]

    All the LED's worked. I had read that the center row of lights would glow in the dark a bit. That is due to bleed-over from the LED's that illuminate the speedo and tach. With the garage lights dimmed, the glow was not too noticeable. However the camera caught it (and exaggerated it) when I snapped a picture:

    [​IMG]

    Here's the same thing except the garage lights were back on:

    [​IMG]

    Maybe you can tell that the speedo and tach illumination LED's light the gages quite well, even showing up in the picture where the garage lights were back on.

    I rode the bike in the dark tonight, and there is one troubling issue. The alternator light comes on with the key switch as normal. When the engine starts, the light goes out at about 1200 rpm -- good! The problem is that when cruising around town at anything below about 3,500 rpm, the light starts rapidly flickering like heat lightening on the horizon. I never had this with the old incandescent bulb, and my charging system seems to be working fine. I guess this will bear some investigation. Maybe I need to clean the slip-rings?

    The bike is all cleaned up and ready to ride. I want to check the air filter and the points gap and the timing, but decided to wait till I've run the gas tank empty to make it easier to lift it off. It was clear full and why drain it into a can when I can just go use it up on the road?
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  13. Carott

    Carott Adventurer

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    fxray,
    I have followed and enjoyed your R90 build thread.
    When I got back into riding a few years ago I realized that I could not function without a lift table. I bought the Canadian equivalent of a Harbor Freight lift.
    Very quickly it became apparent that I needed a place to put my feet down as I rode up onto the lift. I built the extensions out of 2 x 8 lumber and trimmed the height to match the lift table. I made the base pieces a couple inches wider so they fit under the lift table. This was to keep them from tipping over if my feet got too close to the outside edge.
    I added a drive on wheel chock to hold up the bike until I got the straps put on. This is mounted with wing nuts for quick removal when I need access to the front wheel.
    Thought I had a great setup until the first time I sat on the bike and tried to rock it out of the wheel chock. Both of the outriggers slid out away from the lift table and I nearly went down with the bike.
    Thus the final modification to add the bent rods that hook into the lift table. Now I need to find a way to remember to unhook them before raising the table.

    Photos attached.

    Thanks again for all the detailed information in your build thread.

    Brett
    20170904_134139~01.jpg 20170904_134424~01.jpg 20170904_134623~01.jpg 20170904_134645~01.jpg
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  14. Carott

    Carott Adventurer

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    fxray,

    PS: I also put a KatDash in my 1974 R90/6 and it works great. There is no flicker of my gen light.

    Brett
  15. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Hi Carott, Thanks for the comment. It looks like we have similar setups. I was going to add a couple of metal hook straps on both sides to tie my boxes to the lift table, but found that the boxes I built did not slide easily on the floor. They are easy to pick up and move, but actually sort of difficult to slide. I hadn't considered tipping them over. I may have to revisit this. Glad you didn't get hurt.

    As for the KATDASH gen light, I found this on their website FAQ's:

    [​IMG]

    So, I guess I am one of the few, the proud, the lucky ones with this issue. I can't see the flicker in the daylight; only at night. It happens on my bike with the headlight and taillight on, but with all the additional farkles shut off. Actually, I'm the only farkle on this bike and I don't consume any electrical power from the charging system. :lol3

    I am going to happily learn to ignore the flicker. From reading Kat's text above, it just tells me that my battery is fully charged and the voltage regulator is working as it should. Another sign of this is that the bike always starts instantly, even though it has yet to see a battery tender or any source of charge aside from the alternator. The flicker on my bike seems to be from about 1900-3000rpm. I think it adds character.

    This morning, I rode the bike to see my friend Tom Dowell, inventor and manufacturer of Excel Throttle Control. He set me up with one and installed it on my R90. The trip home was infinitely more comfortable for having it. I have wanted one ever since I started riding this bike, but I wanted to find some hand grips I liked first. Plus, I wanted to see if the bike was viable and if I liked it well enough to spend the money on it. It is and I do. :D

    To bring this story full circle and back to talking about lights, I was rolling north to go home along one of my favorite Illinois county roads, when I noticed another motorcycle up ahead, also northbound. He pulled out and passed a 4-wheeler and stepped up the pace a bit, so I decided to see if the old Airhead could catch him; you know -- just to get a look at his bike. I kicked it up to about 20 mph north of the speed limit and was closing on him. I could tell he had a Harley bagger.

    Just as I had passed the law-abiding 4-wheeler and was coming up behind that other bike, some southbound 4-wheelers swept past. The other biker suddenly cut off onto the shoulder (paved, but not real wide), whipped a fantastically well-executed U-ie on the 2-lane road, and blasted southbound. As he whipped that Harley around, his whole bike lit up like a Christmas tree with flashing red and blue lights all over that thang! A line from a blues song instantly flashed through my mind. I could hear Clarence Gatemouth Brown singing . . . "he chauffeured us in his po-leece car with the lights a flashin' like a blood red star!"

    I was sorta glad those southbound speeders happened to blow by before I passed that other biker. Sometimes you win one. :brow
  16. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    Karma. 'Tis all good here!


    :wink:
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  17. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

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    I'm sure glad I read this tonight and not tomorrow morning. I'd have been snorting coffee out of my nose! You might have told the trooper that he should be embarrassed to have been passed by a 44 year old 900cc antique.
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  18. Arktasian

    Arktasian Lets call it Naturalized

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    Ramps.jpg

    Very interesting - that would allow me to lose my training wheels.
  19. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Heh! Yeah, they work pretty well. I should say that the idea is not my invention. I just refined what a friend of mine had done for his lift. He made side boards from 2x12" lumber that was not full length like the boxes I made. His setup was also a good deal heavier. They worked fine if used right, but I witnessed first-hand one day what happens when they are used wrong.

    I learned that . . .
    • Lots of whisky, a Harley Davidson, and a HF lift are not a good combination.
    • Side boards don't help if they are left clear up at the front of the bike lift, when the ramp is clear at the back.
    • Feet flying around like windmills don't help when the bike is stopped halfway up the ramp.
    • You can't kill a legend (what he said when I asked if he was O.K. after the incident).
    • Harleys are heavy to pick up off the floor.
    Don't try this at home! :jack
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  20. Arktasian

    Arktasian Lets call it Naturalized

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    The obvious flaw in that story - Single Malt would have clinched the procedure
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