My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. tlub

    tlub Long timer Supporter

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    Late to this party, but...
    When I was in high school, in 70 or 71, there was this girl that drove a 61 or 62 Studebaker Lark with a factory-built rumble seat! Were there more made in 62? I remember she got it from her grandfather, and it was, IIRC, pink and white. This was in the south suburbs of Chicago, so it could have been the same car.
    I remember riding in that rumble seat.
  2. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Anything's possible. I wish I'd had my camera that day. The car I saw was a perfect restoration.

    I didn't drive my Mom's car very often if I could help it, but when I did, I remember hearing "Show us your Lark" from my friends, until I was sick of it. Who else is old enough to remember cigarette ads on TV?!?

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  3. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Cigarette ads on TV? I remember when everybody on TV smoked cigarettes. In the real world we smoked everywhere like hospitals, airplanes, in stores and restaurants.

    There was an in between time with this. We had no smoking sections in restaurants, in hospitals you could smoke in some rooms, on airplanes there was a smoking section.

    Now I can't smoke in my room or anywhere else in the house I live in. I can't smoke in the car I drive because I carry passengers. I could start drinking again but I can't smoke in the bars in Maryland.

    Can't smoke in bars? Can't smoke when I'm getting plastered? Somehow that one really doesn't make sense.

    It's too much trouble to smoke any more. I'm quitting soon. Again.
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  4. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    Go for it, Charlie. The life you lengthen may be your own! :thumb
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  5. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    Like they "used to say"..... quitting's easy... I've done it many times.... !

    As a non-smoker, and having always hated the smell/aura of cigarette smoke... I hope you do, both for your sake and for the sake of those around you! Though I gotta admit, I can spend a helluvalotmoretime in bars now that nobody smokes. I guess (?) that's good?

    :D
  6. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^I enjoyed the habit for about 49 years, and always liked the smell/aura of the smoke. I don't anymore, since I have been clean for a little over two years. I can tolerate it, but it stinks now.

    From a monetary perspective, I just got a notice that my term life insurance premiums were going to be jacked up by about $17/month, which is a little over $200/year. But . . . I notified them that I have been a non-smoker for over 24 months, and they are going to reduce my premiums instead. It calculates out to a savings for me of $625 per year. Adding that to the cost avoidance of a pack-a-day habit ($2,555 per year), will almost offset this latest round of airhead stupidity I have fallen into. :lol3 :lol3

    When I left off, I had delayed getting a BSA A65 crankshaft out of the Metal Rescue bath where it had been soaking. It came out about as well as can be expected. It started like this:

    [​IMG]

    I had removed the con-rods and pitched them, then put the crank into the bucket of liquid that is probably worth more than the old Beeza. I plan to keep putting parts through it until it gets too nasty to use anymore. So, here's the black lagoon:

    [​IMG]

    And the creature that came out of it:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (Note to self: Wear latex gloves next time.) I gave it a blast with the garden hose and then the air hose. I was trying to hurry, because it was about 26°F outside by that time. It had been nice enough earlier that I had gotten out on the CL350 for a while that morning.

    I carried the crankshaft across the street and got my neighbor to weld a hex nut onto the sludge trap plug for easy removal. We also heated up the flywheel bolt that holds the sludge tube, in case it had been installed with red loctite.

    It all came apart O.K., using the nut-on-a-tap tube puller method:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The tube itself looked like somebody had already cleaned it, but they must not have pulled the tube and cleaned the entire sludge trap. The space between the tube and the crank wall was packed tight:

    [​IMG]

    I spent too much time cleaning it out, but here's what the crank looked like when I was done. There is some pitting from the rust, so it would probably need a touch with an external grinder to be used again. That may cost more than it's worth, but I think it might be doable:

    [​IMG]

    I brushed a coat of oil all over it and put it away in a plastic tub for now. I don't know if it will go to the swap meet, maybe someday become part of a 650 Lightning project, or just sit on the shelf forever. For now, it is off the bench and out of my way.

    So, back to the R90/6. I've been sporadically cleaning the grime off this bike, but it came to the point that I had to decide what to do with it. I would really like to do the minimum and get it fired up to see how it runs. The problem nagging at me is that the bike sat in a garage for probably about nine years with the oil pan and valve covers off. Who knows why -- it could have been that the P.O. started to do some routine maintenance, got sick, and never got back to the bike, or maybe he started to tear it down due to a bad engine problem.

    I lean toward the interrupted routine maintenance theory. The thing is that there is nasty, rather gritty dirt all over the rocker arm assemblies. I fear that some of that grit has also drifted down the PRT's. I'm thinking it would be wise to pull the cylinders to remove and clean the lifters.

    It's a shame, because the bike is cleaning up pretty well. I got the fins on the RH cylinder fairly clean, where they were accessible.

    [​IMG]

    On the other side, I tried out a new routine on just a couple of fins. Can you tell which ones?

    [​IMG]

    Tonight I pulled some parts off the engine to make it easier to clean, starting with the fairing bracket. It has a Luftmeister fairing, but that was mounted on a Vetter bracket. I hear that was the normal practice. There were a pair of Fiam horns dangling off the bracket, which I had already removed. Here's the "custom" wiring that went with the horns:

    [​IMG]

    I hate these crappy little parts store crimp terminals:

    [​IMG]

    A fancy button that I had to remove from the handlebars to unwind the relay and wiring from the fairing bracket:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    So then I could pull the front cover. No need to disconnect the -ve battery cable -- the battery is already at the recycling place. There was some strange brown goop inside:

    [​IMG]

    It looked like some wiring insulation had gotten hot?? It came from behind the timing housing. The orange thing is the tip of my Harley Davidson ball point pen, being used as a pointer:

    [​IMG]

    Only one well-preserved dead spider was inside there:

    [​IMG]

    More of the brown goop had leaked to the outside:

    [​IMG]

    I found a genuine BMW air filter, no K&N for this P.O.:

    [​IMG]

    The grate from the suction hood was missing, and at least some mouse activity had taken place. There was one hollowed out acorn, some insects, and some mouse turds.

    [​IMG]

    All in all, not too bad. At least the protective cover was still in place over the nose of the starter.

    So, that will give me some loose items to clean while I wait on parts orders. There's stuff coming from Motobins, Motorrad Elektrik, eBay, and another big batch from Bob's out in Maryland. It's a good thing I quit smoking so I can almost afford all this stuff. :D Almost. :D

    A parting shot. Notice that the engine is still in the frame, and that is where I have promised myself it will stay:

    [​IMG]

    I also told myself I could live with those right angle Karcoma petcocks, but there is a pair of straight ones en route from England.

    Ray
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  7. TwoShoes

    TwoShoes Lucky Wannabe

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    Not looking to dwell on vain cosmetics here, but wow! , you sure got those clean. Would you mind sharing your technique ? I hope it doesn't involve one hour per fin ! Love your writing and your philosophy BTW, always an interesting read.
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  8. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^ TwoShoes, my technique for fin cleaning is really not very well refined yet. I would say it is still in the "early clumsy stage". I was over at Lit67's garage recently (always a source of inspiration), where he has a very nice R75/6 up on the lift table. He has been working on it for a while and it is spotless. He had some brushes he had been using to clean the cylinder fins, but he wasn't sure where he had bought them. I started looking around at different stores, but the closest I could find were brushes for cleaning out reusable drinking straws. I guess hikers and bicyclists use them.

    I finally tried the old standby, McMaster-Carr, and they sell all kinds of brushes. I already had a nylon brush that was 1/2" diameter (maybe part of a gun cleaning kit?), but it was about worn out. I wound up getting some more of those, and some stainless steel ones. Here is the detail on the stainless one from their site: McMaster-Carr. As is typical with this supplier, I ordered them at about 9:30 p.m., and they were on my doorstep early the next afternoon.

    Here's what I was using to clean between the fins:

    [​IMG]

    On the left is a 1/2" stainless steel brush, as delivered. I messed up and got too large a diameter. I can push it into a fin space and either push it or pull it, but I can't drag it back and forth. The bristles get set in one direction, like a ratchet pawl, and won't go the other way. Next to it is one just like it, except I squeezed it flat in my bench vise.

    [​IMG]

    Now it looks ruined, but it works just fine. Also in the upper picture is one of the nylon brushes, a piece of cedar wedge, and the same can of WD-40 that cleaned up the entire engine on my other R90. A little bit of it goes a long way.

    I spritzed in some WD-40, then I used the cedar wedge to hold the brush against the bottom of the fin space while I dragged the brush back and forth with my other hand. It doesn't take very long. In some spots, the nylon brush seemed to work better, but it definitely needed the cedar wedge to hold it into the fin space.

    [​IMG]

    After a little scrubbing, I used the cedar wedge with a piece of paper towel to wipe out the dirt, aluminum oxide, and the residual WD-40. In some smaller areas, I actually used Q-Tips for this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then it's Rinse and Repeat till the towel comes back clean.

    These brushes can be used manually like this, or you can cut the handle to length and chuck the brush into an electric drill. I tried that a little, but was worried about bending or breaking a cooling fin. I may order a couple smaller diameter brushes and try that again. Maybe a 3/16" diameter would work better for this.

    I set this fin cleaning aside for now, because I have decided to pull the cylinders to replace the PRT seals. Since I already have the stuff I used on the other R90, I think I will also hone the cylinders and put in new rings. Since the cylinders are coming off, I will finish cleaning them in the parts washer. Some variation on this brush method should work O.K. for routine maintenance later on. I will not be painting these cylinders like I did on the '74 R90, or using any Rub 'n Buff on any of the alloy. The nylon bristle brushes are mild enough to use on the painted cylinders if necessary to get out bugs and dust.

    Although this bike was easily as dirty as my other R90, it did not have the same level of corrosion. When the dirt comes off, the underlying surface is pretty good. For example, on the other bike, I bead blasted the coils to get the rust off of them, and then masked and painted them. I also bead blasted the mounting brackets and got them replated with white cadmium. On this bike, I just spent some time cleaning (especially the terminals). The coils came up nice:

    [​IMG]

    The starter cover is a little shiny, but it's clean, and I didn't have to paint or reattach the engine badges like I did on the other bike:

    [​IMG]

    So, while I was messing with the coils, I was passively cleaning the Karcoma petcocks that came off this bike. They are the 90° ones, which I don't like, but they are in pretty good condition. They may not have been used very long before this bike went down for its barn nap. Passive cleaning means dropping them into a glass jar full of vinegar, left over from the fuel tank clean-out. I just wanted to see what would happen.

    After maybe three hours, I checked the jar. Ever heard the phrase "tempest in a teapot"?

    [​IMG]

    Remember, this is the same kind of food-grade vinegar that we use to make salad dressing. :lol3

    Inside the jar, there was a continuous effervescence going on, with bubbles and flakes of dirt rising to the top. It was a vigorous enough reaction that the smaller parts were actually moving around on the bottom of the jar. Here's a closer look:

    [​IMG]

    I suppose this is what happened inside the fuel tank when I left it soaking for days -- I just couldn't see it going on in there. Anyway, I fished the bits out of the vinegar and rinsed them off. The one on the right has not gone into the bath yet. (Well, actually the screen on the right one got a vinegar bath for about five days. Both screens were up inside the fuel tank during the clean-out; I didn't realize that till I investigated why none of the old factory liner would flush out through the bungs. :lol3 :lol3)

    [​IMG]

    I think I am going to try the vinegar on my carburetor parts, instead of the Berryman soak. It seems to have done a good job on the fuel tank and this petcock looks clean too -- even inside the passages.

    [​IMG]

    I had new seals on hand, so I replaced the ones in this petcock, using a little silicone grease for lube. I'll get the other one done and then may sell these, since I have some straight ones coming from Motobins.

    When I looked in my parts tub for the seal kits, I found stuff that I forgot I had. For instance, there is a new Teflon rear main seal, and the O-ring for the oil pump cover, both of which came free from an MOA club member. Maybe I should put those in. Maybe I am experiencing project creep.

    Ray
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  9. James.A

    James.A ILL Airmarshal

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    "Project creep"?, I've heard it called "ship fitter's disease", and it is chasing you down for a good pummeling.
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  10. Uke

    Uke visualist Super Supporter

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    You might try brass bristle brushes for cleaning rifles and cleaning rods for pistols, you won't want a rifle barrel handle length.

    I admire your tenacity on cleaning the fins. Do you have a plan to protect them from future corrosion? I can't imagine doing rub n buff down to the cylinders, nor painting with the cylinders still on the engine case.
  11. brittrunyon

    brittrunyon 1992 R 100 GS

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    I found the small tube brushes at the local True Value Hardware.

    Great job on the petcocks!
    From what I remember the one and only time I had mine apart,
    They are a real bugger to reassemble.
    I might try the vinegar on my pistons.

    Thanks for all the images and info.
    BR
  12. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Hey Jim, it won't be the first time!

    Uke, I did use some gun cleaning brushes and wore them out. I was looking for a cheap alternative. I don't plan to use any paint or Rub 'n Buff on this bike, but I have this stuff on the shelf.

    [​IMG]

    I got this when I was trying various things on my '74 R90. I didn't wind up using it on that bike because I used paint and Rub 'n Buff on that one. I don't know how long-lasting this spray is. It may not be much different than spraying the surface with WD-40 and rubbing it down, which some people do to protect alloy cases. I have the Autosol product, so I'll give it a try.

    Hi Britt, I probably didn't look hard enough in the local stores for those brushes. Before you soak your pistons in vinegar, check this out -- the vinegar chronicles continue.

    When I put the first petcock into the jar of vinegar, it had quite a reaction going after about three hours, and I only soaked it overnight. That worked fine.

    [​IMG]

    When I dropped the second petcock into the vinegar jar, it didn't react nearly as much. I figured the vinegar acid had been partly neutralized by the material from the first time around. I got sidetracked for a few days before I got around to pulling this second batch of parts out of the jar. When I did, there was sort of a Ruh-Roh moment. You may notice that, in the picture above, the heaviest part of the reaction seemed to be with the handle. Bubbles or not, after a few days in solution, this second handle was starting to dissolve!

    [​IMG]

    The rest of the parts were O.K., but the handle is die-cast of some kind of pot-metal. It's just a guess, but it looks like the stuff used in the old Amal carburetor bodies, called mazac -- which is an alloy of magnesium, zinc and copper. There isn't much left of the O-ring groove around the outside of the valve body. I was going to just pitch this petcock, but then I remembered that I maybe had saved the remnants of the ones from my '74 bike. Sure enough, I found this replacement part. I guess I'll use this one instead:

    [​IMG]
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  13. Uke

    Uke visualist Super Supporter

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    I suggested the brass cleaning brushes as the brass is softer than the aluminum and less likely to remove any metal from the fins. Stainless steel being harder might erode the aluminum.

    I'd rather sacrifice the brush.

    I'm going to look for this Autosol protective oil. I wonder at what temperature it begins to burn.


  14. brittrunyon

    brittrunyon 1992 R 100 GS

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    WOW!
    Good thing you had a spare.
    I've got my own version of the "Pepsi Challenge" going on.
    The left piston is in Simple Green and H2O, 1:1
    The right piston is in 100% Pine-Sol.
    I've got my money on the Pine-Sol, but only because it reminds me of my house when I was a kid. :lol3
    BR

    DSCN4232.jpg
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  15. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Well, that paints a mental image! Actually, the directions say to spray it on lightly and let it dry, then buff with a cloth. I doubt there will be enough on there to ignite, but it would make an interesting video if it did. An airhead with flames streaming from both jugs might even be a good concept for a nealart shirt.

    Britt, great idea -- a side-by-side comparison.

    There's the doorbell. My order from Moto-bins just got here.
  16. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I have a small box of old petcock parts. Seems no purpose to such things a lot of times but over the years I have gone to this box and found what I needed. I try to save stuff but there's that one time when I decide the part I'm now throwing away is completely useless and then a month later I find this part had some use. Happens all the time. The policy now is not to throw anything away untill the repair has been working for at least a month and even then I may have to keep it.

    The worst mistake is made by the NooB that throughs parts away before the repair is even completed. You have been told.

    Of course I'm not speaking to you Ray.
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  17. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Long timer

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    Love the dissolving petcock - I had similar experience soaking a corroded seat latch mechanism - almost completely eaten by the vinegar in about 30 hours. Think I’ll stick with “metal rescue”
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  18. tac650

    tac650 Broken...

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    +1 on Metal Rescue it has always worked well for me, but not cheap.
  19. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

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    "+1 on Metal Rescue it has always worked well for me, but not cheap."

    Not cheap but cheaper than replacing the part.
  20. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    I agree that Metal Rescue is great stuff, but it is primarily a rust remover. One of their FAQ's says:

    Metal Rescue is a rust remover designed for iron and steel. It is safe on metals other than iron and steel as long as they are not left in a Metal Rescue soak too long. Metal Rescue will remove some oxides from copper, brass, nickel and certain aluminums, however, immersion time is critical. The length of immersion time is dependent upon the amount of oxidation present and alloy composition. It is recommended that the following metals be checked approximately every hour so as not to damage the surface under the oxidation layer: aluminum, brass, copper, chrome, gold, lead, nickel, silver, titanium, tungsten, solder or solder points.
    You should have taken that latch mechanism that got eaten by the vinegar and thrown it in as a bonus with the exploding-pins-seat-lock that you sold to Lit67 :lol3 :lol3

    (That's an inside joke, folks -- dmftoy1 is actually a standup guy who sells good parts.)

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    I've been picking away at peripherals on the Brown Bomber (Havana Gold R90/6). Since I've decided to make this a road bike, I'm keeping all the stuff that people usually remove and pitch right away, like the Luftmeister fairing. If you are a surviving nerd from the 1970's, you will probably like the way this bike looks when it is all done. I figure that so many bikes have been redone as naked builds, this will almost be unique. That's funny, because they all used to be dressed out this way.

    One thing is the Reynolds Tour Rest. Duane Ausherman has a good story about how he literally "dreamed this up". I got one with this bike, as well as with my '74 R90. The one for the '74 is in good condition, but it only goes on when my wife is going to ride on the back. I could use it also on the '76 Brown Bomber since it is easy on/off.

    The problem is that the one for the '74 has white piping to match the seat on that bike. The '76 seat has black piping, and the Tour Rest that came on the bike matched, but had a hole in the side of the pad.

    [​IMG]

    It also had some funky, crinkly 1970's era vinyl on the side panel. I looked on-line for a pad that would fit. There are some on eBay, probably made in Viet Nam, that are very inexpensive, but I couldn't find one exactly the right size. Also, there needs to be a zipper across the bottom of the pad to give access to attach it to the bars.

    So . . . I sprung for having one made. I opened the zipper on the old pad and drilled out the rivets from inside the cover to remove the pad from the bars. I dropped off the old pad to Ernie Cox at Fulton Top in Peoria, Illinois. He used it as a pattern and had a new one ready to pick up the next day (no hill for a climber -- he's been at this game for 50 years!).

    While he was doing that, I ran a 5 mm drill through the rivet holes in the bars, and tapped them to accept M6x1.0x16mm bolts, with 30mm O.D. fender washers. These bolts get inserted from inside the pillow pad and screw into the bars. They are hidden, just like the original rivets were.

    I also polished up the chrome. I think it all turned out pretty nice.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I also got the other petcock back together:

    [​IMG]

    Now I'm cleaning up other nerdly stuff, like the crash bar off the '74, which I plan to put onto the '76. I may even use those funky little chrome highway pegs that used to be on there. When I got the hardware plated for the '74, I threw the mounting bits for these in with the batch.

    [​IMG]

    This is an old picture. There were actually four of these on the '74 R90! They don't have rust anymore, and the mounting hardware is in nice fresh white cadmium. The bite marks (fairly minor) are still on the crash bar where these used to reside. This may be going too far, but they would be less intrusive than, say, something like this skull and dagger one from the Kuryakyn selection. It looks comfortable, but isn't very airhead apropos:

    [​IMG]

    I'll eventually get organized and get into some engine work. Most all the necessary stuff is now in the war chest. Well, actually, it's in a medium sized cardboard box.
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