My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Long timer

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    Hi Ray - talked to George about his transmission today - we are thinking we need a shim session with you sometime after he and deb get back from Ireland.

    I have a set of those parallels from Cycleworks.

    Take care,
    Dave
    junkcollector and fxray like this.
  2. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Here's a belated reply, and some other stuff. George and I did re-shim his transmission. We used one of my new parallels (mentioned a couple of posts back) as a flatness gauge against the inside of the rear cover. It didn't rock and we couldn't get a .001" feeler gauge anywhere between the parallel and the cover, so we dispensed with the parallels and measured the counterbore depths directly from the surrounding surface. That simplified the process, but if there had been any out-of-flatness condition, we would have used the parallels and measured the depths relative to the outer gasket surface.

    I had mentioned earlier that I broke the subframe on my '74 R90/6:

    [​IMG]

    I was going to scrap the subframe because the taillight harness is supposed to run inside the frame tube, making it impossible to plug and weld. Then I learned that later bikes had the harness ty-wrapped under the frame rail anyway. So, why waste the subframe? I found that the inside diameter of this metric tubing was a few thousandths of an inch bigger than a 9/16" bolt. I beveled the ends of the break and drilled a couple of holes near the fracture point. I cut the head off a 9/16 x 3" bolt, sprung the break apart and slipped the bolt inside. Working with a seal pick through one of the drilled holes, I could move bolt to where it was centered across the fracture. Then I got my neighbor to weld it up, filling in the drilled holes to further bond the joint. I ground down the extra weld and will have the shop blast it and powder it again.

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile, the old R90 is still running with a temporary subframe, and it accomplished something I had planned to do since I first got the bike. When I was first able to unlock and open the seat, there was an old flier from the Falling Leaf Rally at Potosi Missouri in the tool tray. It was from the original owner riding the bike there in 1994, a few years before the bike went into barn storage.

    [​IMG]

    So, this past weekend, a friend and I rode our bikes down to the latest session of this rally, 25 years later. They are still doing the anvil blast, which I wanted to see, but the trip turned out to be less than ideal.

    I'm usually a big fan of the Weather Underground website. They are almost never wrong, except for this one time. The rain was supposed to end by 1:00 pm on Friday. At noon, there was just a drizzle, so we took off for parts south. It kept getting colder and rainier all the way down to Potosi, but we made it alright. At least we weren't tent camping (though a lot of folks did). Next morning, this was the view out the front door of the motel room.

    A frosty R1200RT:

    [​IMG]

    And my equally frosty R90/6:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I normally never hear my 45 yr old Bosch starter make more than a split second of sound -- the engine just immediately fires right up. Well -- not that morning. It didn't appreciate the 20W-50 still in the crankcase, I suppose. After several tries, varying the choke position and trying my best not to flood the engine or run the battery dead, she did fire up. We were on the west side of the motel, so I sat on that frosty seat and rode to the other side to let the bike sit in the morning sun for a bit.

    The rally was down on attendance this year, according to my riding partner who has been there many times before. But, they did blast the anvil two times, which was something I have long wanted to see.

    Here was the setup, two steel disks on the ground, with an anvil upside down on top of the disks, then another anvil right side up. This left a cavity inside the two anvils to be packed full of black powder. You can see the fuse protruding from a hole drilled into the lower anvil:

    [​IMG]

    Fire in the hole:

    [​IMG]

    I don't know if they warned the people in the church across from the site or not. But, this is Missouri, where they probably don't get too concerned with stuff like this. Besides, the rally people have been doing this for years and it's probably expected by now. So, we had liftoff:

    [​IMG]

    At that point, we all got a surprise. Somebody's dog took it upon himself to rush toward the explosion to see what was going on. This was while the anvil was still airborne (estimated 150+ feet into the air, judged by elapsed time aloft):

    [​IMG]

    But, they called him back; he did an exit -- stage right; and the anvil came back down without hitting him.

    [​IMG]

    Afterwards, the base plates and base anvil only shifted a little bit:

    [​IMG]

    The anvil that flew came down like this:

    [​IMG]

    After they dug it out, there really wasn't much of a hole in the ground, but it would have done a number on the dog if he hadn't left in time:

    [​IMG]

    This shows how close the anvil landed to the launching pad, maybe 15 feet away. I have heard that in some previous blasts, it has come down and hit the base anvil, but they don't like for that to happen. It can actually damage the anvils so they say.

    [​IMG]

    After that, we went into town and had a good tasting meal. Then it was back to the motel and to sleep -- for a little while. Within an hour, I was feeling sick to my stomach and eventually was up about fifteen times through the night, violently trying to lose that good supper. It was still cold the next day, but -- sadly -- the bike started again and I had to ride the 250 miles back home. I was about as strong as a newborn kitten, and not sure I could "sit saddle", but we made it. A day and a half later, I am just starting to feel normal again.


    All was not lost. At least I got some nice stickers and a rally pin, and a souvenir flier that's 25 years older than the one that the bike brought home the first time.

    [​IMG]

    Rally on!
    (uhh, maybe)



    globalt38, 3DogNate, WRC51 and 12 others like this.
  3. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

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    Hey Ray, looks like you’ve been busy. Gotta show those anvil pics to a blacksmith buddy of mine. Frosty seat looked comfy also. Got promoted to trucker for my farmer friend. Learning to drive an Eaton tranny. It’s a good feeling when you go through all 10 gears without grinding. Here’s a pic of his bike. I think it’s an 85. Kickstart only and it’s got a big belt on the left side. His wife has a similar one.

    Attached Files:

  4. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Hey Ody, what makes you think that's a promotion? Full retirement is a promotion! :lol3

    Yep, I'm very familiar with that shifter. Does he prefer that you float the gears, or double-clutch each shift? Since he is a farmer with an open belt primary on his Harley, I'm guessing he wants you to keep away from that clutch pedal unless you are taking off from a dead stop. Good luck, and don't get stuck in a muddy cornfield. Let us know when you get the boss converted over to riding an airhead.
  5. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

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    The only trucks I drove before this one were 5 speeds with a hi-lo axle which you double clutched. He gave me about 5 minutes training and turned me loose saying you’ll figure it out and you can’t break the tranny. Yes, he prefers using the clutch only for starting then floating it. The upshifts came easy but still learning downshifts. I don’t usually drink but after driving it 8 hours in traffic I needed a couple stiff ones! My hats off to anyone doing this for a living.
    He’s pretty much a diehard HD guy but he really liked my Super Sherpa. He’s already talking about putting a carrier on his service truck and using a dual sport to shuttle equipment around and check crops with.