My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Long timer

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    Hi Ray - talked to George about his transmission today - we are thinking we need a shim session with you sometime after he and deb get back from Ireland.

    I have a set of those parallels from Cycleworks.

    Take care,
    Dave
    junkcollector and fxray like this.
  2. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Here's a belated reply, and some other stuff. George and I did re-shim his transmission. We used one of my new parallels (mentioned a couple of posts back) as a flatness gauge against the inside of the rear cover. It didn't rock and we couldn't get a .001" feeler gauge anywhere between the parallel and the cover, so we dispensed with the parallels and measured the counterbore depths directly from the surrounding surface. That simplified the process, but if there had been any out-of-flatness condition, we would have used the parallels and measured the depths relative to the outer gasket surface.

    I had mentioned earlier that I broke the subframe on my '74 R90/6:

    [​IMG]

    I was going to scrap the subframe because the taillight harness is supposed to run inside the frame tube, making it impossible to plug and weld. Then I learned that later bikes had the harness ty-wrapped under the frame rail anyway. So, why waste the subframe? I found that the inside diameter of this metric tubing was a few thousandths of an inch bigger than a 9/16" bolt. I beveled the ends of the break and drilled a couple of holes near the fracture point. I cut the head off a 9/16 x 3" bolt, sprung the break apart and slipped the bolt inside. Working with a seal pick through one of the drilled holes, I could move the bolt to where it was centered across the fracture. Then I got my neighbor to weld it up, filling in the drilled holes to further bond the joint. I ground down the extra weld and will have the shop blast it and powder it again.

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile, the old R90 is still running with a temporary subframe, and it accomplished something I had planned to do since I first got the bike. When I was first able to unlock and open the seat, there was an old flier from the Falling Leaf Rally at Potosi Missouri in the tool tray. It was from the original owner riding the bike there in 1994, a few years before the bike went into barn storage.

    [​IMG]

    So, this past weekend, a friend and I rode our bikes down to the latest session of this rally, 25 years later. They are still doing the anvil blast, which I wanted to see, but the trip turned out to be less than ideal.

    I'm usually a big fan of the Weather Underground website. They are almost never wrong, except for this one time. The rain was supposed to end by 1:00 pm on Friday. At noon, there was just a drizzle, so we took off for parts south. It kept getting colder and rainier all the way down to Potosi, but we made it alright. At least we weren't tent camping (though a lot of folks did). Next morning, this was the view out the front door of the motel room.

    A frosty R1200RT:

    [​IMG]

    And my equally frosty R90/6:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I normally never hear my 45 yr old Bosch starter make more than a split second of sound -- the engine just immediately fires right up. Well -- not that morning. It didn't appreciate the 20W-50 still in the crankcase, I suppose. After several tries, varying the choke position and trying my best not to flood the engine or run the battery dead, she did fire up. We were on the west side of the motel, so I sat on that frosty seat and rode to the other side to let the bike sit in the morning sun for a bit.

    The rally was down on attendance this year, according to my riding partner who has been there many times before. But, they did blast the anvil two times, which was something I have long wanted to see.

    Here was the setup, two steel disks on the ground, with an anvil upside down on top of the disks, then another anvil right side up. This left a cavity inside the two anvils to be packed full of black powder. You can see the fuse protruding from a hole drilled into the lower anvil:

    [​IMG]

    Fire in the hole:

    [​IMG]

    I don't know if they warned the people in the church across from the site or not. But, this is Missouri, where they probably don't get too concerned with stuff like this. Besides, the rally people have been doing this for years and it's probably expected by now. So, we had liftoff:

    [​IMG]

    At that point, we all got a surprise. Somebody's dog took it upon himself to rush toward the explosion to see what was going on. This was while the anvil was still airborne (estimated 150+ feet into the air, judged by elapsed time aloft):

    [​IMG]

    But, they called him back; he did an exit -- stage right; and the anvil came back down without hitting him.

    [​IMG]

    Afterwards, the base plates and base anvil only shifted a little bit:

    [​IMG]

    The anvil that flew came down like this:

    [​IMG]

    After they dug it out, there really wasn't much of a hole in the ground, but it would have done a number on the dog if he hadn't left in time:

    [​IMG]

    This shows how close the anvil landed to the launching pad, maybe 15 feet away. I have heard that in some previous blasts, it has come down and hit the base anvil, but they don't like for that to happen. It can actually damage the anvils so they say.

    [​IMG]

    After that, we went into town and had a good tasting meal. Then it was back to the motel and to sleep -- for a little while. Within an hour, I was feeling sick to my stomach and eventually was up about fifteen times through the night, violently trying to lose that good supper. It was still cold the next day, but -- sadly -- the bike started again and I had to ride the 250 miles back home. I was about as strong as a newborn kitten, and not sure I could "sit saddle", but we made it. A day and a half later, I am just starting to feel normal again.


    All was not lost. At least I got some nice stickers and a rally pin, and a souvenir flier that's 25 years older than the one that the bike brought home the first time.

    [​IMG]

    Rally on!
    (uhh, maybe)



  3. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

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    Hey Ray, looks like you’ve been busy. Gotta show those anvil pics to a blacksmith buddy of mine. Frosty seat looked comfy also. Got promoted to trucker for my farmer friend. Learning to drive an Eaton tranny. It’s a good feeling when you go through all 10 gears without grinding. Here’s a pic of his bike. I think it’s an 85. Kickstart only and it’s got a big belt on the left side. His wife has a similar one.

    Attached Files:

  4. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Hey Ody, what makes you think that's a promotion? Full retirement is a promotion! :lol3

    Yep, I'm very familiar with that shifter. Does he prefer that you float the gears, or double-clutch each shift? Since he is a farmer with an open belt primary on his Harley, I'm guessing he wants you to keep away from that clutch pedal unless you are taking off from a dead stop. Good luck, and don't get stuck in a muddy cornfield. Let us know when you get the boss converted over to riding an airhead.
  5. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

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    The only trucks I drove before this one were 5 speeds with a hi-lo axle which you double clutched. He gave me about 5 minutes training and turned me loose saying you’ll figure it out and you can’t break the tranny. Yes, he prefers using the clutch only for starting then floating it. The upshifts came easy but still learning downshifts. I don’t usually drink but after driving it 8 hours in traffic I needed a couple stiff ones! My hats off to anyone doing this for a living.
    He’s pretty much a diehard HD guy but he really liked my Super Sherpa. He’s already talking about putting a carrier on his service truck and using a dual sport to shuttle equipment around and check crops with.
  6. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Almost a year and a half have slid past since I quit working on my Havana Gold 1976 R90/6. I'm trying to get back into it and barely remember where I left off. This bike had a murky history when I bought it (pictures here). For an unknown reason, it had sat in an abandoned shed for nine years before I got it. During that time, the oil pan was removed and sitting on the floor next to the bike, all dirty and nasty. I'm guessing the original owner had removed it to service something and never got back to it. I don't know who he was or what happened to him. I got the bike from a guy who bought it to flip it.

    [​IMG]

    So, one of the last things I had done when I stopped working on the bike was to remove the oil pickup suction bell to clean it, since it had been exposed to airborne dirt for so long. The bolts were hard to remove and when I got them out, they looked like this:

    [​IMG]

    At the very tip of each, there was a dab of weld across the roots of the thread! I thought the bolts had to be this way before they were assembled, which meant they were destroying the mating threads in the crankcase when somebody ran them in, and again as I removed them. What a crazy way to lock the bolts in place!

    Shortly after finding this, I put the bike away and quit working on it, but I sort of kept thinking about how to fix the threads in the crankcase -- maybe with helicoils? I was trying to think of how to access the holes to drill out the old threads without removing the engine from the frame. I was also worried about drilling the holes straight, even if I had access to them. Then there was the issue of why the bolts were like that to begin with?

    A couple weeks ago, I showed those bolts to a friend who is smarter than I am. He doubted the bolts had been run in there with the weld patches in the end threads. He told me to take another look at the flange area inside the crankcase, and to check the length of the bolts against the thickness of the flange inside the crankcase.

    "I'm betting those are through holes," he said, "and the bolts are probably long enough to stick a few threads out the other side of the flange when it goes together. If that's the case, somebody assembled it and then tack welded the threads that were poking out the backside of the flange. It's a good way to keep the bolts from coming out. I've done that lots of times in the past, in similar situations with suction bells on car engines."

    Well -- mystery solved! He was right. I never suspected somebody would do something like that. Moral of the story is, if you try to take one of these apart and the bolts are turning hard, STOP!

    If I had shielded the flange area from grinder dust and cut off the ends of the bolts with my Dremel Tool, the bolts would have spun right out. I have it fixed now, and will post more on that later.
    mslim, brittrunyon, Cogswell and 2 others like this.
  7. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    I have that pan on my R90S sidecar rig. Only deep pan I have come across with fins inside and out for heat transfer (other than a Fallert magnesium pan).
  8. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Jim, that pan is by Heukerott. Here it is flipped over:

    [​IMG]

    So, the bike is bolted to brackets on my basement motorcycle jack:

    [​IMG]

    By sitting the bike down till the wheels were on the floor, I was able to jockey the brackets around to move the bike off to one side, then raise it back up to have clearance to work on those bolt holes inside the crankcase. The round cross brace rod on the jack was the main interference for using my power hand drill:

    [​IMG]

    Here's a look inside the belly of the beast. The holes are close enough to the edge that I wanted to use the smallest diameter drill possible to make the repair:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I considered several possible repairs, and made up a little decision matrix to decide which one to use. I know that sounds crazy, but if I did it wrong I'd be looking for another block (or at least removing the engine to get this one welded):

    [​IMG]

    Probably the best fix would be a couple of Time-Sert inserts. If you are not familiar with those, they are a solid thread repair insert with the internal threads "timed" or synchronized with the external threads so that the hole in the parent material can be drilled and tapped as small as possible. Since the sleeve is solid, it can be installed with Red Loctite on its external threads and the bolt that screws into it will not be permanently locked. These are pricey though, if you don't already have the kit.

    I considered going to a 5/16-18 bolt, but couldn't bring myself to mix inch fasteners onto a metric bike.

    Jumping to the next bigger metric bolt would mean going from the standard M6 bolts to M8 bolts, since M7 is not commonly available. However, you can order M7 bolts from BelMetric.com, which is what I decided to do. My local Ace Hardware and Menards store had M7x1.0 bolts, but not long enough to use here with the spacer on the suction bell for the deep pan.

    I was worried about drilling the holes straight, but decided I could use the pickup bell spacer as a drilling / tapping guide. I figured there would be enough existing threads left in the flange that I could use an M6x1.0 bolt to hold the spacer in place while drilling and tapping the other hole to M7x1.0, then use an M7 bolt to do the first hole:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here's a comparison of the M6 vs. M7 bolts:

    [​IMG]

    When I went to bolt the spacer in place as a guide, I was surprised that the M6 bolt felt pretty good in the existing threaded hole. That got me thinking that maybe only the crests of the internal threads were messed up. I decided to chase the threads, run in some M6 bolts, and see if they would hold torque. Of course, I had to order thread chasers from Amazon because I couldn't find them locally:

    [​IMG]

    They seem fine, but it is a little strange that the hex size on these metric thread chasers is 7/16"!

    [​IMG]

    Here's what came out of the holes:

    [​IMG]

    And here's the thread chaser cleaned off again, to show the way the chaser is made. These are supposed to just clean and reform the existing threads, rather than remove a lot of material like a regular tap would do:

    [​IMG]

    Then I ran in the M6x1.0 bolt and brought it up to torque in steps, to see what the threads could take.

    [​IMG]

    I got to 80 inch pounds and all seemed well. I think this may have all been much ado about nothing, to quote Shakespeare, but I guess that's the way I fly.

    I'm going to use a pair of 8.8 rated M6x1.0 bolts with Blue Loctite, torqued to 78 inch pounds, and hope for the best.
  9. Franque

    Franque Been here awhile

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    Although I'm sure that, if American made, they started with 7/16 hex stock for those, 7/16 is within a gnat's hair (about .004 bigger) of 11mm. Glad to see that all it took was a chaser!
  10. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Exactly so, Franque, which had me puzzled because of my preconceived notions. I figured that these metric chasers would certainly take a metric wrench on the hex. I tried two 11mm wrenches and found that neither would quite go onto the chaser hex. Yet, a 12 point, 12mm wrench fit so loosely that it would spin around the corners on the chaser without turning it. WTF? I grabbed my calipers and measured the chaser as .4375 inches across flats, which is 7/16 of an inch.

    A couple other little anomalies that caught my eye involved the M7x1.0 tap that I bought. It carried the brand name Vermont American, Robert Bosch Tool Corporation, Mount Prospect Illinois. Meanwhile, the back of the package says "Made in China".

    [​IMG]

    Although the normal tap drill size for M7x1.0 is a 6 mm drill, the metric tap package says to use a 15/64" bit. Maybe they figured that most Americans wouldn't have the metric drill? There is only .002" difference between 6mm and 15/64".

    [​IMG]

    No wonder people get confused over the metric system in this country. :lol3
    bpeckm likes this.
  11. Franque

    Franque Been here awhile

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    Yeah, I hear you. I've found it hard to find metric drill bits in the US, especially decimal bits. It seems as if SAE drill bits are a bit more granular, which could partially explain that. Also, as you know, there's not a hard and fast rule for drill bit sizing versus hole diameter. Different materials should ideally be different size holes, and different pitches of the same diameter need different size holes. The small differences shouldn't matter too much, but for long term use it'd matter. That being said, I doubt that you'll wear out an M7 tap.
  12. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Tonight I finally finished what could be the longest duration, most mysterious oil change ever. This little task involved three people, one of whom is now dead, and the bike was moved twice during the oil change, more than 80 miles. The title was processed twice through the state of Illinois during that time, into two different names. One of the vehicles that carried the bike on its journey has since been totaled out in a collision. The job is finally done though, except for oil -- I still need to add some oil. :lol3

    It started sometime in 2008, when an unknown previous owner of my '76 R90/6 drained the oil and removed the oil pan. I don't yet know why he dropped the pan, but he left it sitting on the ground next to the bike. He never got around to putting the pan back on, and he reportedly died sometime in 2010.

    In 2017, a friend of the family bought the bike and got clear title in his name. The garage where the bike was still sitting was to be torn down and the family wanted the bike gone. This guy had no interest in the bike except to flip it. In moving it to his house, he managed to lose the pan bolts, a side cover, the tool tray and tools, a pair of Krauser bags, and some other stuff. Oh yeah, the keys to the bike -- he lost the keys.

    I bought it from him later that year, and brought it home. I did quite a bit of work on it and bought a lot of parts for it but then got sidetracked myself. I didn't put the oil pan back on till tonight, eleven to twelve years after the oil change got started. I also put in a new oil filter. I'll add oil later after I get some other stuff done on the bike.

    There it is, one of those Heukerott deep pans:

    [​IMG]

    There's an extra plug hole on the back end, probably for an oil cooler return line (I'm guessing). That hole had a standard airhead transmission drain plug in it, the kind with the magnet. The problem was that the hex was too big to fit a socket onto the plug without fouling the adjacent fins. I didn't see a need for a magnetic plug there anyway because it will never be removed. A Honda car drain plug from AutoZone has a smaller hex and fits in there just right:

    [​IMG]

    I opened up the filter cavity for the first time since I've had the bike, not quite knowing what to expect. There was a normal, hinged oil filter in there. The bolt holding the inside cover was less than finger tight, and one of the prongs was broken off the inside cover. Otherwise it all looked clean and normal. I did have to reach in with a seal pick to extract the inner seal that disconnected from the filter and wanted to stay where it was.

    I cut the filter open, but it also looked O.K.:

    [​IMG]

    So, I'm trying to get myself interested in this old Airhead once again. I spent so long without working on it that I had actually forgotten where I was with the project. I was pleasantly surprised to open up the "war chest" full of parts I have already bought. Seriously, I didn't know I had all this stuff accumulated!
  13. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    Sometimes these are "adventure bikes" before they even leave the garage! :lol3

    Bet that rear hole was drilled for a temp sensor. Not an ideal spot for one, but I've seen that before. Could be used for a turbo drain back hose. ;)
    BoxerD likes this.
  14. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

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    Usually with a deep pan, the drain plug isn't fitted in the bottom (as it's too close to higher objects on or in the road) but rather, fitted to the back of the pan. A riding friend caught her drain plug on the ramp of a ferry boat and snapped a piece out of the pan, what a mess. After that she went back to a standard pan.
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  15. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Turbo drain back hose -- yep that's what I'm gonna tell people (assuming the bike ever leaves my basement).

    I could see that happening, Pokie. At first I would have said that the cooling fins stand proud of the flat, socket head drain plug on the bottom of this pan, but actually they don't. The plug stands proud by maybe 3mm. The plug at the back of the pan can't be a drain though. It would leave a rather large puddle of oil and sediment in the bottom of the pan at oil change time.

    [​IMG]

    Last year, a friend with a later model BMW (the model and year escape me right now) was rolling his bike down a poorly improvised ramp from a pickup truck. The drain plug caught the front edge of the ramp and bent, but did not break, the bottom of the case (no separate removable pan). The plug didn't rip out, but it was no longer perpendicular to the spotface on the case, and would not seal. Another friend, who is a retired toolmaker supervisor, made up a special jig and re-machined the spotface to match the new position of the threaded hole. It's still working.
    ____________________________________

    Aside from the old Airhead, I've been picking at my two non-titled basket case bikes. My goal is to make them look like motorcycles without spending a lot of money on them. That will let me start the title process. Meanwhile, I'm enjoying reading up on them and finding the odd piece parts they are lacking. Here's some stuff about the Honda, and I'll put up some more later about the old Beeza.

    For example, the wheels on the 1970 SL350K0 Honda really need the rims either replaced or replated. The spokes need to be replaced. The ancient tires are weather checked and split. Despite all that, the tires hold air, and they look good once I got the 50 year old mud off them. So I cleaned up the wheels good enough to just make a roller. I would never ride on these tires. This is as good as I could do without disassembling them or soda blasting. I just used some elbow grease.

    [​IMG]

    Then I spent some time with the lights and the horn.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I bent the rules a bit on the headlight by ordering a new chrome rim. The old one polished up nicely, but it had a crease in it from somebody's long-ago get off in the dirt. David Silver Spares had a NOS one on hand. I went ahead and ordered all the new bolts and nuts for the lights while I was at it. That doesn't sound like much until you start putting the order together.

    The taillight base is a one-year-only part, no longer available. There was one on eBay recently for US $279! The one I have was rusty and bent and needed to be replated. It is a one-piece welded assembly and is hard to clean inside. I soaked this one in the generic version of Evapo-Rust from Menards. They carry the Sunnyside Brand. Then I polished it and wherever there was bare steel showing, I gave it some "poor man's chrome" with an artist brush and some Rustoleum Silver blended into the chrome. I straightened the bent part as well as I could. It'll be covered by the license plate someday (I hope).

    The taillight lens was another little splurge. They are still available from Honda. The lights all work now, including the high beam indicator, although I used one of my replacement Stanley bulbs from stock already on hand.

    The horn was a mess, but I had a couple spares and put pieces together from two to make one. It honks again like it did 50 years ago, after I cleaned the breaker points inside, and re-sheathed the harness.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I worked a little magic on the seat too. All I had was the rusty pan, and it needed a patch welded. Still, it was straight and mostly solid.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It looks a lot better now:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    O.K., I can't lie about this. The seat magic involved PayPal and an eBay seller. He had this re-pop seat up for less than it would have cost for foam, cover, buttons, etc. and it took a whole lot less effort on my part.

    The handlebars were also a bit of a challenge. They were tweaked and badly rust pitted through the chrome. Somebody used this Honda for its intended purpose back in the day.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    With some more elbow grease and some more PayPal/eBay work, they look pretty good now:

    [​IMG]

    These came out of California and are reverse engineered to match the original NLA bars. They are very close, except they are about one inch wider on each side (two inches overall width). Maybe that will give this old guy more leverage when riding it someday.

    I was ready to start assembling this bike into a roller, but when I brought the frame into the work room . . . YIKES! I found a flaw that I had not noticed before. Evidently, in the blasting process, the powder shop opened up a hole in the frame where there was a soft spot. I think it can be welded, but the point is, they didn't stop and call me. They went ahead and powder coated the frame. So there it is, a hole where there should be no hole, and inside the freshly powder coated frame tube, it is still full of blast media. It isn't in a spot where it will show much, but . . .

    :dirtdog
  16. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

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    Looks like it's going to be a pretty nice bike when you're done!
  17. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^^Thanks Pokie. There was a nearly perfect example of the same year, same color, Honda SL350K0 that sold recently on eBay. The seller put up a lot of nice pictures, which I downloaded and saved for inspiration. Once I get this one titled, my plan is to go back through and finish it up.

    I went ahead and powder coated the frame, so that I will not have to tear it completely down again. Later, it won't take much to pull the tins for paint, rebuild the wheels, put on new tires, etc., which will be the more costly part. I went for the nice re-pop bars and seat while I had the opportunity, because who knows how long those will be available.

    The big side covers are also available in re-pop, for $200 a pair. The original ones are pretty much unobtainable. They were plastic and did not survive well at all due to UV light (and crashes). The new ones are a different plastic that is supposed to be more durable. Those can wait for now.

    Here is how the bike should look:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There are some things that make this bike a one-year-only model. The taillight, the side covers, the rear fender, the headlight ears, and the electric starter (which went away in the following year).
  18. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Back in May, 2017, I made the mistake of dragging home a pile of BSA parts. Here's the picture from back then:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Eventually I pieced it together to become a roller, but there was no centerstand and the kickstand lug is badly mangled. I had it sitting on my motorcycle jack till I needed the jack for my R90, so I built a little table from scrap wood and strapped it to that.

    Here it was on the jack:

    [​IMG]

    Last summer, when I should have hauled all this mess over to the Chief Blackhawk Swap Meet and gotten rid of it, I somehow just couldn't do it. Instead, I did the opposite. I bought a centerstand and a set of standard stanchion tubes for the old bike. My thought was that I would like to have it as a roller that would stand up by itself without being strapped to something. Just a centerstand wouldn't do; I had to get rid of those 12" over fork tubes, or the centerstand wouldn't reach the ground. How much trouble could it be to replace the tubes and the fork seals?

    A couple weeks ago, I took the front end back off with the intention of taking the front suspension apart and rebuilding it with minimal time or expense. That was sort of the top of a slippery slope.

    I read a little on here and on the BritBike forum, and a common theme was how hard it is to disassemble the seal holders (aka dust excluders) on a BSA without the proper tool. But -- several people said it was easy with the proper tool. You can even make one yourself if you have the ambition.

    I didn't have the ambition, but I found one on eBay and made the guy an offer which he accepted. Here's all you need then, to make the job easy:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The tool slides down over the stanchion tube and into the seal holder, where those tangs on the business end of the tool engage a couple of slots. Presto, they spun right apart. Here's one slider with the seal holder removed and the seal knocked out.

    [​IMG]

    The more observant here will notice that the sliders have failing chrome plating, left over from the chopper phase. They are supposed to be painted black. No problem; they can be scuffed and painted for free, or powder coated for about $30 apiece.

    Somewhere in this process, about 1.5 cups of gray, brackish water ran out of each slider. I also began to notice the most nasty black slime I can remember since I had to replace some sewer pipes once. The smell was similar too. This did not bode well for a simple seal and stanchion replacement.

    Once again, I have run on too long on a bike that isn't even an Airhead, and it's getting late here. More to follow . . .
  19. Franque

    Franque Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
    Oddometer:
    270
    Location:
    Dallas, Tx
    I like watching you work, a thread for your projects like @JagLite 's would be appreciated, by me at the very least.
    racerb likes this.
  20. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    3,789
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO
    That seems to be the way with buying old BSAs. Here's a photo of the way my M20 came home (the rebuild story hasn't really started yet).

    Tommy001.jpf.jpg
    fxray, brittrunyon, globalt38 and 2 others like this.