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My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    16,621
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    Loves me some Beezers. :nomystery
  2. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    Hi Franque, that's very nice of you to say that, and to mention @JagLite in the same sentence with me, but he is on a whole 'nother level from me with the projects he undertakes (and actually completes!). I share your admiration for his work, as shown in the Some Assembly Required board, and maybe that is where I should be posting. I'm here in Airheads because that's what I started with, I have another one in process, and sometime soon I hope to be back at it. Plus, I am an Airhead. Anyway, if you want to see more of my projects, there is a whole lot here if you go back to page 1 and start slogging through it.

    It'll be nice when it's done, though, Pokie. I figure it's good to keep some stuff like that waiting in the wings for the time when the spirit moves you to start in on it.

    Hi Disston, I know where you could find one -- well . . . it used to be one. :lol3
    _____________________________________________

    So, when I left off before with this '68 BSA 650 Lightning, I had opened up the front forks to swap in some standard stanchion tubes and replace the seals. Taking a peek at the new tubes I bought last summer showed that they were the wrong ones for this bike. On the package its says, "97-3906 1968-1970 BSA". They are probably right for the 1969-70 bikes, but in 1968, BSA built a one-year-only front suspension. My bike needs a pair of 68-5144 tubes. The parts book calls them out as a "shaft" instead of a tube or a stanchion. Shaft? Could that possibly be a Freudian slip?

    Here is some trivia -- if I have my history right, BSA went with damper rod front suspension starting in 1966. This continued through 1968, which is the year I have. However, in 1968 they started using the Triumph TLS front brake. The Triumph front end had a 6.50" span between the sliders, while BSA had 6.75". No problem, they just made the sliders a little different to take up the slack. In the process, the 1968 sliders became unique -- they don't fit any other year of BSA. In 1969, they got rid of the damper rod setup and began using a shuttle valve damping system. Then, of course, in 1971, all hell broke loose and they went with the Oil-In-Frame bikes.

    So, the features that this bike shares with the Honda SL350K0 mentioned a couple of posts ago:
    • One-year-only parts from about 50 years ago
    • Both are basket cases
    • Neither has a title
    • I'm dumb enough to pursue them both
    In the damper rod setup, there is supposed to be a steel rod threaded into the underside of the top cap of the stanchion -- the cap that you remove to pour in the oil. Mine were in there, but they weren't doing anything.

    [​IMG]

    When the DPO from long ago decided to chop this bike, and liked the idea of 12" over fork tubes, the damper rods were too short to reach all the way to the top. No problem -- he just dropped them down inside the tubes and let them ride there. What could possibly go wrong with that?

    Somewhere along the line, water was introduced. The damper tubes and rods suffered greatly from rust. The first one I took out was nearly one solid piece of crud. I went medieval on it with an angle grinder and cutoff wheel, just to find out what was inside,

    [​IMG]

    The second damper tube was better, but still not usable. Looking on-line, at first it seemed these are unobtainable parts. Turns out they are out there for a price. At least I can exchange the incorrect stanchion tubes that I bought for the correct ones and the same seller has some good, used, damper tube parts. I'll be working that out fairly soon.

    Meanwhile, I've picked up the odd part here and there to sort of "flesh out" this old bike. I need to make it look like a viable machine before I can try for a bonded title.

    Fuel tanks are still being hand made in India, with mixed reviews. A nice, factory used tank may well go for US $500 to $700. Dented and rusty ones get listed on eBay for $150 to $250.

    I recently found one on eBay (US $89.95 shipped) that actually has no dents and includes the cap and center trim piece. It is not the right year, but close enough. I think it is a '67. I have always sort of admired the fuel caps like the one it carries. The '68 cap is more like a BMW Airhead, which I like on my R90, but seems a little bulky for the BSA. This tank has an exotic, asymmetrical paint job, rattle canned with purple, blue and black, on one side only :lol3 :

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The chrome sort of polishes up, but the whole tank has been scuff sanded to try to get paint to stick to it.

    [​IMG]

    I stripped part of the tank on the drive side to see what was under the paint:

    [​IMG]

    . . . and gave the aluminum cap only a light polish:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The bike has a seat now, from a member on BritBike forum, and from another member on there, I thought these pipes looked interesting (his picture of a bike he was parting out):

    [​IMG]

    My idea here is to give this bike the "oily rag" treatment and to buy parts on the cheap that match the "patina level" of what is here already. To this end, I'm going very slowly on any cleanup and polishing. I don't foresee any plating, and minimal painting. I'd like to end up with a mostly correct, numbers-matching, rough but ridable gravel-road-exploring bike.

    Oily rag is a valid term. I love the look of original paint showing through surface rust, showing through an oil film. It reminds me of the finish on an old steam locomotive, or an old, well-used British motorcycle. :lol3

    I did give those header pipes a bath in some de-rusting liquid, along with a very rusted front fender from the same source. I think this bike will have painted fenders, but just rattle can.

    I started with one end of these three pieces stuck into that 5-gallon bucket in the picture. After a couple days, I reversed the ends. Then I used an old wallpaper pan to soak the middle.

    [​IMG]

    The pipes look like they have lived a good life, maybe been down a time or two, but they may have a little left to give. They came at a very friendly price.

    Finally, another little project this past year was to buy a new computer. It replaced the old Dell that was still running Vista Home Premium, which then went to the work room to replace the Compaq Presario that was still running Win98. That one went to the recycler. I'd had that one since 1999, but it was too slow even for stand-alone use in the work room. The Dell is great for .pdf shop manuals, music, and pictures of what I am trying to reassemble.

    So, if you recall the famous self-portrait of Norman Rockwell, showing him painting his self portrait, that once graced the cover of the Saturday Evening Post:

    [​IMG]

    . . . here is a picture of one of my BSA headers cleaned up a bit and posed a la Norman Rockwell with my new (to the work room anyway) computer.

    [​IMG]

    Just for grins, I took a picture of my header pipe leaning on my computer, which was displaying a picture of itself holding up the pipe, and in the picture it was displaying there was a picture of itself again with the pipe. Well, you get the idea. I could have taken it further, but that could go on to, uh . . . infinity (much like this project thread).

    Ray
  3. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,150
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO
    I like riding an oily rag. Showing a bit of age but still working to keep it in good running shape. Problem is, I just can't seem to stop myself from slowly making it better and better.
    Jim K in PA, JagLite and fxray like this.
  4. OdyBandit

    OdyBandit Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,812
    Location:
    Central Illinois
    I think your Honda’s May be worth more than your Beemers Ray. Mecum auction. 9E32DC22-48B9-46C6-910F-9615ECD95A56.jpeg
  5. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    ^^^Hi Ody,

    Yeah, if only mine had an original flying dragon paint set! People seem to go nuts over that.
  6. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
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    Illinois, USA
    A few more notes from the rust laboratory. I propped up a wheel from the old Beezer on the work table so that I could scrub on it when I get the notion.

    Now, the smart thing to do here would be to measure the wheel offset, cut all the spokes with a bolt cutter, powder coat the hub, buy new spokes from Buchanan, order a new rim from CWC, lace it all up, etc. However, this is the untitled POS parts pile that I am trying to avoid spending any more than the minimum just to make it a piece of floor art. At some point, I will pursue the bonded title.

    [​IMG]

    There's a thread on here somewhere that asks, "What did y'all do with that worthless wheel clamp that came with your Harbor Freight lift?"

    I found that mine works pretty well if I just set it on the bench and clamp a wheel in it, creating sort of a tripod. The wheel stays very stable, can be unclamped and rotated easily to a new position, and the whole mess can go back on the shelf when I'm done with it. It doesn't need to be bolted down to do the job.

    [​IMG]

    The rim is cleaning up to a marginal level, but good enough for my goal here. I will need to apply a little bit of "Poor man's chrome" (aka Rustoleum Bright Silver paint) in a few areas.

    After only a very few minutes with a cheap brass bristle brush from HF, and some spritzing of WD40, there is quite a difference in the brake plate.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is the first year TLS brake on the '68 BSA, so it is worth having.

    I have picked up pretty much all the parts to put this one-year-only front end back together. I had mentioned earlier that I thought the seal holders could be saved, so I bought a pair of seals for them. Here's where I was doing exploratory surgery and cleanup.

    [​IMG]

    In the picture above, I had already held them on a mandrel and lightly tapped the tops of them back to a round shape. Then, I went after the last of the rust inside the seal holders. The process was to hold the part with one hand and run my electric drill with a steel wire brush up and down inside the part where the fork spring sits. I was almost done when I realized that the wire brush was tickling my hand through the wall of the seal holder. Yikes -- I had removed all the structural iron oxide, leaving only pin holes through the chrome!

    At least these seal holders are readily available. I guess the minimum investment level just went up a little more. :lol3
    kenbob, bykpimp, brittrunyon and 3 others like this.
  7. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

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    Apr 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
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    Fort Collins, CO
    Funny how making a few parts nice again will restore your desire to keep working on the project. Especially when the cost is minimal.
    aptbldr and bpeckm like this.
  8. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    Ha! That's a good one. Call it, Cleaning to a fault.
    fxray likes this.
  9. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,150
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO
    No, the fault of cleaning.
    bpeckm likes this.
  10. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    Disclaimer: No Airhead stuff here, just a little more on the old BSA.

    Looking back a few posts to #986 above, I was lamenting the fact that I had cleaned my Beezer seal holders so well that the insides were showing through to the outsides. Since all I want to do with this bike is get it together enough to go after a bonded title, I really didn't want to pony up for a new pair of seal holders. I also didn't see the logic in driving new seals into the old holders, so I was kind of stuck. Then I remembered that this is sort of a glorified mock-up and it will all have to come apart again later if I really do anything with it. The short term goal is to make it into a movable roller that can stand up by itself without occupying one of my floor jacks.

    So? Not to worry -- I'll just put it together without fork seals, and jot a note in the book so I don't forget to fix it later.

    Shortly before the advent of social distancing (I sure am sick of that term), my neighbor was in the mood to do some welding. I obliged him by carrying my Beezer frame over to his house and we spent the day working on it. Some long-ago PO had made this bike into a chopper and had cut the main frame tubes just behind the upper shock mounts. Then, I guess his conscience bothered him, so he welded the tubes back on -- badly!

    [​IMG]

    The tubes were splayed apart more than three inches beyond the correct dimension, and I wasn't sure if they had gone to the trouble of inserting slugs inside the tubes before welding. I drilled some small holes and discovered that there actually are slugs inside the joints. So, we tied a string through the headstock (steering stem was out) and stretched it tightly down the main frame tube, centering the string on the fuel tank mount and on the center of the front seat mount. We did some measuring from the string centerline to both sides of the frame. I had bought a nice used rear fender from a Brit-Biker in California, and used it as a template to bring the frame rails back into alignment. That same guy had also sold me a used seat, support rail, and tail light at very friendly prices.

    My buddy stood by with the oxy acetylene torch and heated the frame wherever I requested and I did the bending. It always pays to use the correct tool for the job, so I was using the four foot cheater pipe that I once used for snap binders in my flatbed trucking days. We only burned through the string and had to replace it maybe two times.

    We actually did do some temporary bracing and so forth, but I won't go into all that. When we were done, all was straight and true and the fender fit as if it were made for that frame (or vice versa).

    There were still the ugly welds to deal with:

    [​IMG]

    I used an angle grinder and cut part way around each tube, beveling the ends. Then my buddy broke out his mig welder and redid them a bit at a time to avoid distortion. We let things cool down and moved to another area and rinsed and repeated till the welds were new and proper, all the way around both tubes. I then ground his welds down smooth. Sorry, no picture of the finished product, but they came out looking good. I forgot to take a picture before I put the seat on, so they are hidden any way. The price was right. He did the heating and welding purely for the enjoyment of it all!

    I literally and liberally wiped the whole frame down with an oily rag, even going so far as to use a wire brush with oil in a few of the nastier spots. Where we had heated the frame with the torch, I blended in some Ace Rusty Enamel in satin black (yes -- with a brush). It all came out looking good to my eyes, but I am an optimist with stuff like this.

    Then I started hanging parts on there, either buying used or making them myself (for small stuff like fender spacers etc.). I finally got it to the tripod stage:

    [​IMG]

    With a centerstand and the rear wheel, I could lift the front and roll it out of the way. It could then stand there all on its own -- progress!

    As I mentioned earlier, the seal holders for the front forks are toast, or at least close to it, but I decided to put it together temporarily anyhow. I then found that the new bronze bushes for the lower sliders were not quite right as far as fitting the new stanchion tubes. The lower bushes fit great, but the uppers are a few thousandths undersize on the I.D. (won't slide onto the stanchion tube), and a few thousandths oversize on the O.D. (won't slide into the lower legs). A few seconds with a Sunnen Hone would fix that, but my friend who has the hone is definitely in the at-risk group for this evil virus. We will wait on that procedure.

    Stalled out again!

    But wait -- this is a mock-up, so I used the sloppy old upper bushes and it all fit fine for a temporary assembly. With lots of other fiddling around, it is now a two wheeled roller that can stand up by itself. The front fender came from another Brit-Biker in Pennsylvania, who also sold me the used header pipes at a good price.

    Without my girth sitting on there, this bike presents a very slim profile for a 650:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Most of the rest of the parts came from Ed and Lori Zender, owners of Morrie's Place up in Ringwood, Illinois. They are good people to deal with, and they have a good stock of new and/or used British parts.

    I tried to take a picture of my new Beezer Roller, but the LED shop lights made the camera lens shut down some. That may be for the best with this beast, hiding some rough spots and making it look a little better than it is:

    [​IMG]

    There's not actually a Yamaha engine in the BSA, that is just showing through from the bike behind it. :lol3 :lol3

    Also, the centerstand I put on the BSA is a good one, and I did go with the correct stanchion tubes, so you may wonder why both wheels are touching the ground. That is because, since there are no fork seals, I didn't think it wise to add any fork oil. I can grab the front wheel and slide it upwards to where the springs make contact, and there are several inches of clearance from the tire to the floor. At least there doesn't seem to be any stiction.

    With a touch of post-editing picture effects, this thing almost approaches BSA advertising quality from bygone days.

    Well . . . maybe in my imagination!

    [​IMG]
  11. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,987
    Location:
    Road Island
    Always good to see your attention to detail, with a good amount of Humah (that's yankee talk) thrown in. The attention (and the humah) are to be aspired to.....

    Best to youse (that's NJ talk), be safe, be healthy and keep on doing yo' thang (perhaps southern talk?)

    :photog
  12. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    Hi Bob, thanks for stopping by. Nobody can accuse you of pandering to the crowd by using different accents -- you've lived in, or spent time in all those places long enough to earn the right(s).

    Speaking of different places, in playing with this old pile of parts, I have been amazed how well the different parts fit, since I got them from all over the place. For example, I got the side covers from an inmate on here who lives up in Alaska. My frame came from somewhere in Illinois. One end of the RH side-cover has to attach to the toolbox, which was absent on here. So, I picked up a nice used one from who knows where. Then I got a repop set of Oddie studs (aka Dzus Fasteners), and it all snapped together just fine. I guess it did all come from Small Heath in Birmingham at one time, 52 years ago, but the bits and pieces have been all over the world in the meantime.

    This thing is a numbers matching, non-titled, rolling bitsa, emerging from a pile of dust and rust. Sort of the opposite of parting out a bike. As such, it is a new experience for me. Most of the other junk bikes I have dragged home have most generally been all there.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile back upstairs, the CL350 has a fresh oil change, is detailed out, and is waiting for a light tune-up.

    [​IMG]

    And, to get back to some Airhead content, the R90/6 just got done with the same. I just changed all the oils, put in new points and condenser, set valve lash and timing, and ran the Grok on the carbs. It ran great on a test run a couple weeks ago, but now seems to have developed an off-idle stutter that wasn't there before. I think I will try another carb adjustment, but it has been sitting so long there may be some bad fuel lurking. Perhaps a little water in the Bing bowls?

    [​IMG]
    junkcollector and Cogswell like this.
  13. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    No airhead content today, just some odds and ends. This year has seen a couple of Japanese bikes in the garage, newish type stuff I had never worked on before, although they are both 13 years old already (my own newest bike is from 1992).

    First off, I used my enclosed trailer to meet an inmate over in Indianapolis to buy his 2007 Suzuki SV650 that he had advertised in here on the big board. That was in February, when we were still living in the land of the free and could go into restaurants for sit-down meals and all those other things we once took for granted. He was in the process of moving from Tennessee to Michigan, and agreed to trailer the bike up I-65. I picked a spot on the south side of Indy where we could have a meet-up. The logistics worked out great. A buddy of mine went along for the ride, and we had lunch in Indy. Just as I was paying the tab, I looked out the window and saw the Suzi on a trailer coming in across the street at a large, empty parking lot. (Google maps with images helped me pick the spot.) In about 20 minutes, the bike was inside my trailer, he had his money, I had the title, and we were both on our way. The trailer worked great!

    This is as close as I have come to a fly 'n ride, and the first bike I have ever agreed to buy sight unseen (aside from pictures). It worked out well.

    This bike wasn't for my use, though. I was helping out my grandson, who successfully completed the basic MSF class last November and had been looking for a bike. He had showed me some junky ones that caught his eye, but I talked him out of them, one after another. This one looked good to me, and the price was very right. We got it home and worked on it for a week or so, just doing little odds and ends. This was my first experience dealing with tupperware body parts, but the bike was sound. He has run up a couple thousand miles already.

    Some background on the kid. It seems like only yesterday when he had this fancy blue bike and I was trying to convince him that there really was such a thing as countersteering:

    [​IMG]

    The sidewalk in front of our house runs uphill. I used to get the grand-kids to peddle their plastic three-wheelers uphill to the corner, turn around, start peddling downhill as fast as they could, then take their feet off the pedals to coast at WFO speed. We called it the "bring-it-down-fast" corner. There were lots of power slides, collisions, and rollovers into the grass. It was great fun, and it worked with roller blades too, even in a Mutant Ninja Turtle costume, again with the occasional fake wipeout:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    His cousin, only two weeks different in age, was the one chasing him down the hill.

    Time flies!

    The cousin has now completed a little over two years in the USAF. And the Ninja Turtle guy has an updated blue bike. He's headed off to the Army Reserves at the end of the summer:

    [​IMG]

    The Ninja thing must have gotten into his blood, though. About three weeks ago, he came riding in on another 2007 bike that his girlfriend had just bought. It seems that she took the MSF class with him last year and decided she wants her own ride. This one is a bright red Kawi Ninja 650R that she bought locally. Like the SV650, this is also a 2007 model. It wasn't long before it was up in the air for some of Grandpa's attention:

    [​IMG]

    We gave this one an oil & filter change, repaired some minor damage here and there, fixed an open circuit so the horn would honk, and spooned on a new set of Bridgestone Battlaxes. Here's old vs new:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I pointed out to the kids that the front tire had been put on backwards the last time, and explained why the tire manufacturers put arrows on the sidewalls. We made sure to put the new tire on t'other way around.

    But wait! The new tire was spooned on, and the wheel was on the balancing stand, when I noticed the arrow on the wheel hub. Duh! I didn't know the wheel was directional too. It seems that the PO had installed the tire the right direction on the wheel the last time, but then they had put the whole wheel & tire assembly backwards into the motorcycle! Of course this meant that I now had the tire arrow in conflict with the wheel arrow.

    I got on-line and soon realized that I wasn't the first to have this happen. Nobody seemed to know why the wheel was directional, and there is no visual reason for it. I finally read that the bikes with ABS need the arrow because of how the chopper disk fits. This bike does not have ABS, but my OCD wouldn't let me leave it as it was. I dismounted / remounted the tire. Thus went my first experience ever with tubeless tires on a motorcycle.

    I don't have a tire machine, but did avail myself of a set of Motion Pro bead breakers before this job. I wouldn't have wanted to try it without them. There are two variations of these. You can buy the small, aluminum alloy, lightweight ones to carry on a bike, or the bigger, stronger, steel ones. I got the big ones and was glad of it.

    So . . . we still have the "bring-it-down-fast" corner, but now the experience is way louder and faster, and works either going up or down the hill. It puts a grin on my face when he leaves here to blast up that hill. He and I both remember the old days.
    ______________________________________________

    Meanwhile, downstairs in the corrosion lab, the old Beezer has seen some progress. One of the worst things the PO did with this basket case was to lose or throw away almost all the original British hardware. I made a major leap forward this month due a lucky deal with a guy who sold me three boxes of his salvaged British bolts, studs, nuts, and washers -- about thirty pounds of it!

    I spent several days with my calipers, thread gage, dies, and taps, just sorting and cleaning and chasing threads. I already had the proper taps and dies from working the hardware on my old Triumph TR6R.

    I printed out the pages from my BSA Parts Manual that showed the engine cases and covers. Then I noted the part numbers on the pages where they showed the exploded view. With these part numbers, I looked up each one on-line and found the size and description that goes with that part number. This site is an excellent resource for that purpose. I scribbled the descriptions next to each bit of hardware on the exploded view. Armed with the diameters, lengths, head type, and threads per inch, I could pick out the correct fasteners for each spot. There are more required than you might imagine. Here is the page just for assembling the left and right crankcases together:

    [​IMG]

    Once those are together, it takes 27 more Pozidriv machine screws of several various and sundry lengths, just to attach the primary and timing side covers. If I didn't have the right length, I cut a longer one down to size and dressed the end, but I only had to do that in a few instances. He had sold me a nice assortment.

    You can read many cautions telling you that you must absolutely never use a Phillips screwdriver on Pozidriv fasteners. You will destroy them if you even violate this rule one time! The ship has already sailed on these Pozidriv fasteners, but they match perfectly with the Patina of this old bike. I ran them in with a #3 Phillips. Someday, I will buy Pozidriv screwdrivers and maybe some JIS ones for my Japanese bikes too. Someday.

    So, now being in possession of the case bolts and the engine mounting studs, I could lightly clean, polish, and assemble the case halves and put the bottom end of the lump into the frame. Woohoo! Progress:

    [​IMG]

    It's looking more like a real motorcycle all the time:

    [​IMG]

    You may recall that this is just a mock-up build, to let me pursue a title. That simplifies things, because I can leave out such hidden items as crankshaft, camshaft, pistons, gears, gaskets, adhesives, etc. That streamlines the process quite a bit :lol3:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here we have the inner timing cover back in place:

    [​IMG]

    Note the little pocket where the points plate fits, sort of like on the front of an airhead, except that BSA uses two sets of points and two condensers. The jury is still out whether I will put the original ignition back in, or go with a Pazon or a Boyer Bransden setup. Think these old points might still work?

    [​IMG]

    I think this bike must have been stored in a dirt-floored chicken coop with a hole in the roof. The points plate and a few other bits must have been down in the mud for a while.

    I have two outer timing covers, so I had to decide which one to use:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The bottom one in the picture is a little further into the corrosion process, with the white aluminum oxide having started to turn pink and green.

    Also, the clutch lifter mechanism is about as nice as the breaker points shown above. See the little inspection plug there? It is also a little corroded:

    [​IMG]

    Fortunately, these two covers are of different generations (clutch cable abutment is different), and I need the cleaner of the two to fit this '68 bike. I salvaged the inspection plug from the off-year cover, and binned the rest of that cover. The kickstart shaft hole was badly eaten away.

    [​IMG]

    This little wrench that I made some years ago for my TR6R worked well, along with some penetrating oil:

    [​IMG]

    The cover is a little pitted, but it may have a use someday. The single mark above the slot is a thru-hole, not a pit. It is actually supposed to be there. BSA used vented plugs.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the outer timing cover cleaned up a bit and installed. I actually do have the gear set and the kick and shifter levers. I don't think I will need to bother with that for now, just to get the title process going.

    [​IMG]

    I have a couple of sets of jugs and three heads for this machine. Two heads are for a twin carb Lightning, which this bike is supposed to be, but I think I will use the single carb Thunderbolt head. These heads are all for looks only, though. They're not too bad on the outside, but I think they are all trash. The combustion chambers are into the white, pink, and green stage of corrosion. That is sad because there are no broken fins or other damage. I'll see if they can be salvaged when the time comes, but I doubt it.

    I also dug out the handlebar controls and derusted them. I had a brand new set of jackhammer grips that I tried on my R90/6, but didn't like them on there. They fit pretty well on this bike, and I rigged up a front brake cable. It still needs the clip that attaches at the lower triple tree:

    [​IMG]

    Here is how it sits today:

    [​IMG]

    And a reminder of where it came from:

    [​IMG]
  14. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    16,621
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    Just file those points. :rofl

    I've run into dual points twice in my life. Once was on a 1968 Chris Craft boat with twin Ford 427's. Each engine had a Mallory distributer with 2 points. I knew nothing about these but was able to slowly get info enough to figure out what they did. One point was the closer and the other was the opener. While both points were closed was the dwell time. I believe the reason was so that the points wore less than if a single set was doing the whole duty. A number of years ago now and I've forgotten much of what I knew about this system and I never had it in the water, running, much anyway.

    The other set of dual points I had was on a 1972 Honda CB450. I believe in that system each point fired one cylinder in the 2 cylinder bike. Actually liked it much and it worked very well.

    So I'm wondering. Are those points each firing one cylinder? Or 1 is opening and the other is closing?

    I hope you can buy a new plate and the points, etc?
  15. James.A

    James.A ILL Airmarshal

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    260
    Location:
    Central ILL
    On that motor each point set fires one coil. My first bike was a '67 BSA Thunderbolt. There is a steep learning curve on the topic of British electrics.
  16. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    Disston, like James said, there is a separate coil, condenser, and breaker points set for firing each cylinder. This is like your 450 Honda system, except the Lucas points on this bike can each be timed individually. On your Honda, I believe you could adjust timing on the LH cylinder, but then had to vary the points gap to time the RH cylinder if necessary.

    I could get another timing advance unit for this BSA (right now I have none), along with a points plate, etc., but if I get to that point, I would just install a Boyer Bransden unit. That's a long way off for this old bike.
  17. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    16,621
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    I remember now. Yes the trick of setting the gap to make the timing worked really well.
  18. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,475
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    Today, we have some derusting pictures:

    Last time, I jokingly said that I was undecided about using the original ignition on my old BSA, or going with a Pazon or a Boyer Bransden setup.

    To which Disston replied:
    So, just for grins and to entertain Disston, I suspended the points plate assembly in the derusting bucket four days ago. I sort of forgot about it, till just now. I thought that since it was mostly rust, it may have disappeared completely in there. But here is what I found:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Front view:

    [​IMG]

    The back:

    [​IMG]

    After a light rinse with the garden hose:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And after a blast from the air hose, here is the before and after:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    So, Disston was right -- the points could stand to be filed a bit:

    [​IMG]

    But that may be a waste of time. A rivet that once held the spring to the rubbing shoe has let go:

    [​IMG]

    That's my Science Fair project for the week. I am surprised that the derusting solution is still working after all this time. It's the generic version of Metal Rescue, from Menard's big box store, and has been used quite a bit over the past 3+ years. I was also surprised by the details that still existed under all that rust.
    globalt38 likes this.
  19. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    Oddometer:
    16,621
    Location:
    Silver Spring, Md
    Great stuff. Nice surprise.
  20. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,987
    Location:
    Road Island
    Wow, that's quite impressive. I would never have guessed it would work that well!