My Barn Twins

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by fxray, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. OLD GREEN

    OLD GREEN Long timer Supporter

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    Great progress Ray, you'll be riding that beast in no time!
  2. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    "Is this the very definition of A.R.? Oh well, I like 'em on there!"


    I would call it S.Q....... Satisfaction Quotient. Sometimes those little things are just the right thing to do, jus' 'cuz...............

    :-)
  3. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Trivial pursuit -- test your airhead knowledge, but don't think too hard about it :raindance -- see the answer at the bottom of this post.

    The question: Where are these big bolts used on an airhead, and for what purpose ?

    [​IMG]

    There was some progress today -- the valves are refreshed. My buddy ordered a new 8.00mm (.315") pilot for his Neway set, and it fit great. He did a three angle cut on the seats and then very lightly lapped each valve, just enough to see the width of the seat. The valves themselves had already been touched up on the grinder last week.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    For comparison, here is what I took out at teardown:

    [​IMG]

    If you have been looking in on the saga of this old barn twin, you know that I tried the acetone test earlier on one of the heads. The intake valve passed the test; the exhaust -- meh!

    That turned out to be rather lucky, because it forced me to do something about it (or get somebody else to help me out). After my buddy did his thing on the heads today, I bolted on the leak-down testing plate. That's this thing that I mentioned a few days ago --

    [​IMG]

    We hooked up the tester and WTF??!! there was air going everywhere! The gage was showing somewhere around 45% and the air was whistling out of the exhaust port. So, I could tell right away that his leak-down apparatus actually worked! However, it didn't say much for his valve job.

    One of the good things about testing this way is that the valves just need to be slipped into place -- no springs, seats, keepers, etc. are necessary. With the head oriented so that gravity holds the valves down, just apply the air and see how you did. It's quick and easy at this point, and obviously much easier than fully assembling the engine before testing!

    We unhooked it and I took the plate back off. There was a little shred of the rubber gasket that had come off when I poked the bolts through. This little piece of rubber had lodged under the exhaust valve and held it off its seat. With a quick retest, there was no air hissing, and the tester was showing right on 99% (or 1% leakage), which is about a perfect as it gets.

    I packed up my parts and headed for home and there was a box on the porch. This is strange, since Fed-Ex doesn't run on Sunday. Yikes! It was out there since yesterday, and it was my latest tool acquisition. I decided that I needed just one more torque wrench (an even four of them now) to make my life complete.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    "Why?" you might ask. Good question -- it's this blasted old airhead (or that's my excuse). I have a small Snap-On micrometer style torque wrench that checks from 40 to 200 inch pounds. I got that because I was worried about the bolt torque for the oil pan, the pump cover, the timing cover, etc. There's also a nice Snap-On Tech Wrench that I've had for a while. It is a great overall wrench, 5 to 100 pound feet, and you can touch a button to toggle the readout into pound inches or newton meters. The problem is, I figure I should change out the seals on the gearbox and I will need to re-torque the output yoke to 152 pound feet. I need a bigger wrench.

    This latest wrench is a split beam type, made by Precision Instruments, not in China, but right here in Illinois, USA. I wasn't familiar with the company, but they have been around since 1938 and made wrenches for Snap-On up until 2002. They get good reviews on-line, so I'm trying one. It was quite a bit cheaper than Snap-On. The advantage of split beam is the ease in setting the torque value, plus they tend to stay in calibration. It looks like a fine tool.

    I said I have four torque wrenches -- the other one is Fasst brand, used for spokes. I'll be using that again soon, I hope.

    Answer to the Trivia question:

    Okay, it was sort of a trick question. Those are some M20x1.5x30mm bolts that came from Fastenal. In the strictest sense of the word, they are not a factory item on an airhead, but I do recommend them. They are the right size to be hole protectors for the swingarm pin threads during powder coating. They worked very well and they were cheap insurance. I had just pulled them out and had the camera handy -- sorry!

    That's it for now.

    Ray
    Eccentric and RideDualSport.com like this.
  4. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    's funny... my first thought was the swingarm pin threads, that fine-but-beefy thread looked familiar!


    As usual you are over the top with tools.... love it.... The Airhead is Just an Excuse... you toolwhore, you....:raindance
  5. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Bob,

    You're exactly right, and I can't seem to help myself. I have those gearbox tools ordered from Cycle Works to pull the gearbox flange, and the plate to measure for bearing shims. I refuse to buy a hydraulic press, though. I don't have the room for it. That's O.K. because I know a couple people who have them already.

    Ray
  6. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    I've been holding up my next parts order to try to group some things together on the same shipping charge. That means slogging through the parts fiche and deciding what I need. So, one thing I want for sure is new fork seals. After reading on here about how people often find BMW "oatmeal" in their front forks, I decided to take a look for myself. The first one came apart and, sure, the oil was as dirty as a politician, but the cushion was certainly usable.

    [​IMG]

    So, that's one urban legend put to rest. I decided to check the other side anyway, you know, just to be sure.
    >
    >
    >
    Lo and behold! On that side there was a big serving of . . . OATMEAL! :hmmmmm

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Oh well, at least I know what to order now. These forks are not cleaned up yet, but of all the alloy on the bike, they are in the best condition. It should be pretty easy to do them up. Except that last week, when I turned on the parts washer, the little Chinese guy stuck his head out and said, "Not Today!"

    Yep, after five years of faithful service, the pump that is only supposed to run water based cleaner, decided to quit circulating 140 solvent (commonly called mineral spirits). I had to stop and muck out the sludge.

    I would still give this parts washer a high rating. I have used it no end for five years, and have never changed the solvent till now.

    [​IMG]

    I modified it when I first got it, to run the output through a filter.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I was afraid that would be too much restriction, and there wouldn't be enough flow, but I was wrong. The little pump put out so much flow, even through the filter, that I had to add a little ball valve to restrict it. Otherwise, the solvent splashed everywhere. The pump isn't positive displacement, so I could get by with that.

    [​IMG]

    Sometimes I would flip the ball valve completely off for a bit while I moved parts around. It was never a problem.

    The good news is that I could still find a replacement pump, and it's on its way. I hope it gets here soon, I have work to do! :-)

    Later.

    Ray
  7. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    The parts washer is peeing once again, with a clarity it hasn't had for some time. I meant to get odorless mineral spirits, but got regular by mistake. Oh well, that saved about $18 for the six gallons I put in here. With the top down, there is no smell.

    [​IMG]

    In the way of tools, I went ahead and got the Cycleworks kit for pulling / installing the transmission output flange, and their precision measuring plate for the shaft end-play shims. I guess I will go ahead and change my gearbox seals before I put it back in.

    The measuring plate is just because I figure I'll be needing it in the future. To go with it, I picked up a used but nice Mitutoyo depth mic just yesterday from a guy on the local Craig's list. It's an inch mic, but it'll work just fine. I've had some Mitutoyo tools for 40+ years and they still work like new.

    I have mixed feelings here. I helped out a young guy a little bit who lost his job and needed to sell some things, but I'm sad that there are machinist tools on the market due to the rape of U.S. manufacturing:

    [​IMG]

    I should be done buying tools now. :lol3 . . . . . . . . Probably. :lol3

    Here comes a long post on front suspension parts. I hope at least some of it is helpful. Some of it is sort of a rant. Here goes.

    Take some BMW suspension parts made of plastic (or maybe chocolate) that melt and disappear over time, throw in some incorrect / incomplete parts fiche, introduce a confused Clymer technical writer who struggled to write the service manual, and then mix them all together. It's making my head spin! All I wanted to know was what parts I needed to order so that I could rebuild my R90/6 front forks. It shouldn't be this hard. I feel like I'm prying into state secrets or something!

    First off, here is the BMW fiche that covers the damper rod:

    [​IMG]

    Let's look at just the RH edge of the fiche:

    [​IMG]


    Items #13 are the infamous "wiper rings" (3 on each leg) -- No problem.

    Item #14 is called a "guide support" (1 on each leg) -- No problem.

    Items #15, #16, and #9 are the start of the confusion.

    Item #15 is called a "washer" in the parts list fiche, (part number 31 42 123 2763). This part was not present on my bike. I suspect there was an engineering change that put my bike at odds with the fiche.

    Item #16 is shown in the exploded view, but is not listed in the parts list fiche. Again, this part was not present on my bike.

    [​IMG]

    Item #9 is called a "ring" (2 on each leg) (part number 31 42 1232045) I have these.

    So, being a bit confused, I looked at the Clymer manual. On page 484, they present this picture and refer to it twice (scanned from my manual):

    [​IMG]

    One reference is during their disassembly instructions, where it says, "Remove the washer, bushing and ring (Figure 114).

    Ummmmm, well, there's only just the one piece there!

    In the re-assembly instructions, Clymer says, "Install the ring, bushing and washer (Figure 114).

    There's still only one piece there. I think it looks like a ring! Here is a real life picture from my bike:

    [​IMG]

    Putting that aside, let's go back to the full panel fiche:

    [​IMG]

    See, now this is just plain wrong! I tried to make sense of this and the Clymer book for quite a while and it just didn't click. So what's wrong? The phantom lines show the wrong sequence for how these parts fit together. The Clymer Manual picked up on it and repeated the error!

    I took the liberty of sliding some things around in the picture with an editor, and came up with the diagram below, which is a little more clear to me.

    Items #7, 8, 9, 10, 11 are a loose slip fit on the body of the damper rod. There is no way to assemble the parts as originally shown on the fiche, or in the Clymer Manual, and still have the damper rod extend out the bottom of the stanchion tube as we all know it does (see picture later in this post if you don't know what I mean). The parts would not slide past the shoulder on the damper rod. The circlip (item #11) fits into an internal groove at the very bottom end of the stanchion tube (item #5).

    I invite you to scroll slightly up /down here to compare the BMW version of the fiche just above this bit of text, and my revised version below, which is closer to reality:

    [​IMG]

    However, there's still the issue of the parts that dissolve over time and disappear into the fork oil, and there is some confusion when I look at kits from Hucky's, Moto-Bins, and Bob's BMW.

    Moto-bins has a nice deal on their kit. Well, it's nice compared to buying the parts individually. I commend them for putting the kit together. Their site shows a picture, but no parts breakdown:

    [​IMG]

    This kit is their part number 20999. I sent them an e-mail to ask what parts make up the kit. True to form, they sent back a prompt reply. It was in the form of a scanned, hand written note, so I typed a copy to post here for reference (prices and exchange rate current as of yesterday):

    [​IMG]

    The kit sells for 52 pounds or $74.66 (ex. VAT), which is a bargain compared to the $105.53 sum of the individual parts.

    That said, I don't need felt strips, which are only used on the S model. I also don't want that AeroShell 4 Oil, regardless of BMW spec. I don't think I will be changing all the little springs and my old check ball looks fine to me. I think I'll be keeping my existing wiper rings . . . so the kit starts to not look quite so good to me.

    Hucky has a kit as well, but with slightly different content:

    [​IMG]

    Bob's BMW told me on the phone that there is no kit -- just go through and pick the individual parts you want. I later saw a post on here that they do indeed have a kit. However, the kit includes a set of progressive springs. I am not looking to change my main fork springs yet.

    So, I think I know what individual parts to order. Looking once again at my revised version of the fiche:

    [​IMG]

    I am still a bit confused by item #10, which they call a ring, part number 31 42 1234506.

    I did not find any remnant of this on my bike. Perhaps the old one dissolved in the oil, but with all the other errors here, I just don't think it belongs. I would be happy if a guru would verify that or tell me that I'm wrong. I notice that this part is not offered as part of the kits from Hucky or Moto-bins, adding credence to my guess that it is not needed.

    Since this is already way too long, I will end it with some pictures showing the parts from my bike partially disassembled. Maybe it will helps others as a reference:

    I did not loosen or remove the pinch bolts on the lower triple. We'll see if that helps out with the stiction issue after assembly. Also, these parts are not clean yet -- my parts cleaner broke, remember?

    [​IMG]

    As I mentioned earlier, in this picture, you can see the damper rod sticking out the bottom of the stanchion tube on the side that is still assembled. Also note the wiper rings.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the check ball and spring from the bottom end of the damper tube. Note the copper crush washer, whose purpose is to stop leakage from the bottom connection of the slider. I will use a new one of these, anneal it, and still use some HondaBond on it.

    [​IMG]

    Here we have, from left to right, item #7 - bush, item #8 - threaded ring, item #9 - ring, item #8 again - threaded ring, item #11 - circlip, item #12 - wave washer, item #13 - nut. Items #12 and #13 hold the slider to the bottom end of the damper tube.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    My final questions remain -- looking at this picture, where would an item #10 disk fit in?

    [​IMG]

    In regard to the wiper rings, the manual says to purposely line up the ring gaps at installation. I wonder why they want this? Another Clymerism?

    Hope all this is of some use to somebody!

    Ray
    iiatlas and Eccentric like this.
  8. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    Some years ago lots of wiper rings were made too large and when inserted their ends over lapped. Check these for fit before using them. If too large they can be filled like piston rings to get them to fit. The advice lots of times when the rings were too large was to use the old rings, they will work fine. Take your pick.

    I'm working on digesting the rest of it. My head hurts.
  9. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    I had the good fortune of living about three miles away from Hucky when I had my first Slash 2... then I got a 60/6 that needed rebuilding. Hucky is a font of knowledge and will happily discuss with you the proper assembly sequence. As I got into my oatmeal forks I do remember him explaining to me that the parts fiche was wrong, and that part X when over here.... but that was almost ten years ago, so details are, uh, "fuzzy".

    Hucky's background is as a tech in Germany, he is an excellent rider, and just an all-around good guy. I think you and he would be able to figure this out together, particularly with your excellent pics and reference... give him a call!






    Edit: I just found the post (#100 on this page) that I had written (it was '08, so more like 8 years....)

    My forks had turned into what Putts had so eloquently described as "polishing turds", its just that these turds were long, silver, and shiny! The first time I would put the front brake on, the front end would dive... and stay there, like REALLY stay.... the only way to get them back extended was to wrestle the bike back onto the centerstand, with absolutely no load on them. This made for a HARD ride, especially with that plywoood seat. So it was really puzzling: obviously something was acting as a one-way valve, letting the forks absorb, but then allowing zippo rebound.

    After the third time of pulling apart and re-assembling my front forks, I finally got it right. Since all else had failed, I had to do the un-mentionable: ask for directions :evil

    I took in my parts diagram from the MaxBMW fiche, and my Haynes manual, and asked Hucky about the location of one part, which was not clear. Turns out that part number 7 "bush" (with a small b), which is a small clear plastic-y "donut", contrary to all my logical interpretation of this diagram, does not go above that shoulder of No. 18! It fits perfectly there, but that is NOT WHERE IT GOES........[​IMG]

    If you look at this drawing, it goes above parts No. 8-11, which are at the BOTTOM of the slider tube. It is the bushing for the topping out: it goes NOT between the spring and the No 18 tube, but between the tube and the slider: i.e. below the shoulder and wiper assembly on No. 18 tube. It is actually a loose fit, and is there to prevent metal-to-metal contact upon topping out the shocks.

    The proper interpretation of this drawing: No. 12 (the whole assembly of Nos. 13-21) actually goes BETWEEN No.6 and No.7. (not exactly crystal-clear, or is it just my limited mental capacity....never mind!)

    So, there you have it.

    The diagram is easy to mis-interpret. Especially since, when I took it apart, both of the absorbing bushings were literally gonzo, not there, missing in action. They evidently get chewed up, and/or they dissolve into crud, over time.

    I am now quite adept at tearing apart the front end. If anybody needs any pointers, just let me know!
  10. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Exactly so, Bob, except you do not have limited mental capacity. Your problem was that you tried to follow the diagram. This diagram is not just "easy to mis-interpret". The diagram is flat-out WRONG. If you tried to build your forks by the diagram on the BMW fiche or by the diagram shown in the Clymer manual, or in your case, the Haynes (so it is messed up too?) you would have serious problems, as you say you did. That's why I redrew the diagram to reflect what I actually found on my bike.

    Here it is again, redrawn to reflect reality. You'll notice that the parts are shuffled as you described:

    [​IMG]

    Item #7 is the gummi bear ring that fits between the upper threaded ring (item #8) and the collar on the damper rod (item #18).

    A repeat of the picture of my parts laid out in sequence of disassembly shows the ring at the far left, or what remains of it.

    [​IMG]

    I'm going to include a couple of those in my order. :lol3
    ________________________________________

    {Edit} For what it's worth, these are the only front suspension parts I wound up ordering. We'll see how this works out:

    [​IMG]

    As for the fork oil, here's my brand.

    [​IMG]

    I use this in my Harley and in my old Triumph TR6. I figure it's good for these foreign bikes to have at least a little American blood in them. Harley sells three types of fork oil: Type E is about equal to 5W, Type B is about equal to 15W, and Type H/D is about equal to 20W, which is what I use.

    Keep in mind that this is their high performance stuff for closed circuit competition only. I love the note on the back of the bottle that says that Screamin' Eagle Performance fork oil is . . .

    "Not intended for street use" :lol3 :imaposer
  11. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    The weight of the oil should be lighter not heavier according to experiences but you should find this out and it's easy to change later. 4 wt is what they had originally. Most of us use 5 wt because it's common. Somebody here last year tried something even lighter and reported improvement.

    I think the part #10 that you asked about is the metal collar with a ring. The ring shows in the diagram. It is the same part as #9. You use either the #9 or the #10. The ring engraved on the diameter is for identification. The #10 part was for S bikes and possibly RS bikes if I remember correctly.

    Thanks for the new diagram and the in depth coverage of this. It will certainly be easier for many of us the next time we follow you.
  12. R27warrior

    R27warrior Adventurer

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    There is indeed some confusion about the forks of the slash 5 generation.
    You could try - if wanted - to get more information via www.2-ventiler.de. From experience I can state that some guys there (some worked with BMW Motorrad) know EVERYTHING.
    It is a German forum about "zweiventiler" , but I expect that language will not be problematic.
    Easier of course is when you speak German...

    Rob
  13. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    disston,

    You are probably right about the oil. I will consider going lighter. In the past, I have usually found that my front suspension needed stiffer springs and heavier oil, but I have never had a BMW before. I don't suppose body weight has anything to do with it?

    This reminds me of the time I got a physical exam by my doctor. They mailed me the results after a few days, and one thing I noticed was that they were concerned about my BSA. I called the nurse and told her that I had a Triumph, but no BSA. I told her that I wouldn't mind trying one though. She told me that she was pretty sure I did have a BSA, or it wouldn't be on the report. She didn't know what it was about but said she would check and call back. Turns out there is something called Body Surface Area index. :lol3

    You definitely are correct about the item #10, which eliminates that concern -- thank you very much. I went back and took another look at the fiche. There is a note attached to that part that tells us exactly what you said. I had just overlooked the note.

    Rob,

    Thanks, but I think I have it all clear in my head now. The folks at Bob's BMW Parts Department also answered some questions. They have been good to deal with.

    Ray
  14. Disston

    Disston ShadeTreeExpert

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    I love Bob's. Too bad you are not that close. He has many older machines and used to have many of them on display. Over the years the number of vintage bikes has gotten smaller and the last time I was there I don't think it's called a Museum anymore. He hasn't gotten rid of the old bikes tho. He has another warehouse where they are stored and maybe he will open a display there? Ordinarily riders only get to go to the warehouse on special occasions.
  15. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^ That sounds interesting, disston. I wish there was a BMW Dealer here, where I could visit the parts counter in person. I have to buy all my parts on-line.

    Well, I gave the heads a final wash in hot, soapy water and dried them with a hair dryer. Then I reassembled the valves and masked off the gasket surfaces. Today I gave them the same treatment as I did with the cylinders -- Duplicolor DE1612 Engine Primer and Duplicolor DE1615 Aluminum Engine Enamel with Ceramic. I set them aside to cure for a few days, but I won't bother to bake them. I have used this paint before and it holds up very well.

    [​IMG]

    The cylinders and heads are the only parts of the engine that I am painting, but I will probably paint the wheel hubs with the same stuff.

    So, I hope this ends up looking okay. To me it looks better than what I started with, and I figure the paint will keep it from going back to the way it was:

    [​IMG]

    I'm anxious to see the engine back together and sealed up.

    Meanwhile, I bought these from kmcq, one of the inmates on here.

    [​IMG]

    They showed up today, and I was happy to see that they look just like in his picture and are exactly the way he described them. They were packaged very securely, and came at a friendly price. Thanks, Ken, these are a nice step up from what was on the bike.

    I also have a pair of eBay front turn signal brackets on their way, and then all the stuff to redo the front forks, and all the seals for the gearbox are en-route from Bob's. That should keep me busy for a while.

    Ray
  16. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

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    Nice score on the pipes! I saw those, thinking they might be sport pipes. Will be curious to know how they sound.....

    Looking good, glad to see lots of your progress whilst I dawdle my way from cafe to cafe in Lisbon today..... :augie
  17. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    ^^ Thanks, Bob. I hope you are having a good trip over there.

    Regarding the mufflers, the seller told me, "These sound really great, definitely not whisper quiet but not loud. I'd say they're average noise level with a nice deep growl. I'd definitely keep them except they'll be too long for the cafe look I'm doing."

    That sounds good to me. I'm too new to these airheads to know what's what with the various styles of exhaust, except I've heard more than once that the original system used to rot out on a regular basis unless the bike was ridden a decently long distance to cook the water out (true of most all bikes, though). These mufflers don't have any brand name on them that I can see, but I like their shape and they are in very nice condition.

    I piddled around some with the engine badges this evening. One of the badges had fallen off years ago, but the PO had recovered it. It got caught in the cylinder fins and was bunged up a little, but wasn't too bad. He kept it lying on a desk in his office in the barn where this bike sat for so long. When people would be hanging out there, listening to tunes and tipping a few, they would always pick up the engine badge and idly fool around with it. The PO used to get pissed and tell them to "put that thing down before you break it, I'm gonna need that someday."

    I used to mess with it just to get him cranked up. I got yelled at a few times myself for that, so me and this old badge go back a ways. :lol3

    Amazingly enough, it survived and it's time has finally arrived -- maybe. When I was cleaning the engine cases, I took the other badge off. I bead blasted the glue from the backside of both badges, but left the fronts alone until now.

    I've read all the threads on here about redoing these things, but I decided to try a slightly different way. I know that modelers use something called micro mask. I looked at some youTube videos, and decided the stuff looked an awful lot like good old wood glue. I found this ten year old bottle I had was still viable, but I think almost anything like it would work:

    [​IMG]

    I used a little artist brush to paint glue onto the top surface of the letters, which was pretty easy to do. I put on a couple coats. Here, the top badge is the one I was experimenting on. The other one was scrubbed with soap and water, but that's all. I did not strip the old paint from either badge. I wanted to just mess with one badge to figure out my process.

    [​IMG]

    Then I shot the badge with some VHT Black Engine Paint that I happened to have on the shelf. That brand name, VHT, stands for Very High Temperature:

    [​IMG]

    I put on a light coat, followed ten minutes later by another light coat, and then ten minutes after that, I gave it a a fairly heavy flow coat. I let that set up for just under an hour, and then started picking at the glue. It would lift and I could grab it and peel it away in a strip:

    [​IMG]

    The sides of the letters were supposed to stay black, so this was pretty easy to do.

    [​IMG]

    So that was working out pretty well until I started using various implements of destruction to try to scrape the perimeter. There is supposed to be just the faintest line of bare chrome showing around the logo. The beveled edge is supposed to be painted black. That's where I had trouble. The VHT softened the existing paint on the beveled surface. As I was scraping to make the thin border line, the paint film caught and tore from the beveled surface down to bare metal.

    [​IMG]

    So, I was just going to quit, strip the paint, re-mask the logo, and try again. Then I decided to see what it looks like to take all the paint off the beveled surface. It's kind of hard to see in my picture, so I took a couple shots. Here's what I wound up with:

    [​IMG]

    Can you see where the bevel is bare chrome on the top badge, but painted black as it should be on the lower badge?

    [​IMG]

    If I decide I like it that way, then one badge is ready to glue back onto the top cover. If I want it to look more like the Germans did it originally, I need to strip it and start over.

    So, whad'ya think?

    1. Yeah, looks good from here. I like it better than the way it came from the factory. Leave it alone and get on with this already!

    2. No, that will never do. Fix it or you will always regret it.
    Ray
    RideDualSport.com likes this.
  18. bpeckm

    bpeckm Grin! Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,971
    Location:
    Road Island
    :hmmmmm


    3. Put the original on one side, and your work on the other, and challenge admirers to spot the difference.





    :fpalm
    ..........I am definitely on the Number One list!......Looking mighty goood! And great back story about the badges... this was meant to be!
  19. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Oddometer:
    4,535
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO
    I have two different heads and two different rocker covers (each rocker cover suits it's own head) on my bike, it's actually quite rare anybody notices it. So noticing the difference in the badges, I think, will likely not be noticed either.
  20. fxray

    fxray Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,469
    Location:
    Illinois, USA
    Thanks for your comments, Pokie and bpeckm. I'll make the badges match each other, but I think I am going to forget my normal tendency of trying to stay close to factory original. After looking at them off and on all day, I think I like the shinier border, plus it's easier to do. I hope that my radical step into the realm of wild, crazy, exotic, custom modification doesn't cause a shift in space - time continuum, but I think I'll go for it! :bmwrider

    Meanwhile, I'm about to button up the cylinders. Because the Clymer Manual sucks big time, and I easily get side-tracked and forget small but important steps, I made myself up a little checklist to follow.

    One concern is that I'm not real sure how long the working time is with HondaBond 4. I have had excellent results with it on other engines, and I plan to use it here for the base gasket (planning to re-use the aluminum spacer that was on here). I've never left it exposed to air more than about three minutes maximum before fastening things up. I figure there will be some delay (maybe a lot) while I try to get the circlips installed, so I don't want to put on the HondaBond till I'm ready to snug the cylinder into place. The surface needs to be clean for the HondaBond to work, hence all the Brakleen.

    gudgeon = wrist pin

    I also don't have a ring compressor that fits this size piston, so I'm going to rely on the taper at the bottom of the jug, and start the piston into the cylinder on the bench.

    This is my plan of attack -- see any omissions or steps out of order?

    {Edit} This is my revised checklist for myself. After I did the first cylinder, I came back and made some changes. This is what worked for me. If it helps somebody else, that's great.
    _____________________________________________________________________


    Steps in Reassembling BMW Cylinders (1 side at a time)

    1. Clean the cylinder mounting area on the side of the crankcase with Brakleen, denatured alcohol, or other solvent that dries quickly and does not leave an oily residue.

    2. Clean the base gasket plate on both sides with solvent.

    3. Clean the gasket surfaces on the cylinders with solvent.

    4. Clean the gasket surfaces on the heads with solvent.

    5. Place the base gasket loosely on the studs.

    6. Compress the piston rings and insert the piston partway into the cylinder, oriented with vorn arrow pointing to the front, and gudgeon bore exposed.

    7. Brush assembly lube into con rod small end and gudgeon bore in piston, and lightly coat the gudgeon itself.

    8. Start the gudgeon into the piston (may need to heat the piston with a hair dryer or heat gun).

    9. Slide the cylinder assembly onto the studs, engaging the con rod into the piston.

    10. Push in the gudgeon.

    11. Insert, lock, and prove the gudgeon clip (finish by positioning the gap at the 6 or 12 o'clock position.

    12. Brush a thin layer of ThreeBond onto the crankcase gasket surface using care around the top stud oil outlets -- put sealant only to the outside of the stud, leaving the inner area bare, and slide the base gasket plate into position.

    13. Brush a thin layer of ThreeBond onto the outer surface of the base gasket plate, again using use care around the top stud oil outlets -- put sealant only to the outside of the stud, leaving the inner area bare.

    14. Apply light smear of oil to piston skirts.

    15. Lube inside the PRT seals with P-80 Rubber Lube and install the PRT seals onto the PRT's, index lines up (final installed position will be down, but the lines must be up initially to slide the seals past the lower frame rail).

    16. Lube the outside of the PRT seals, and the PRT seal bores with P-80 Rubber Lube.

    17. Slide the cylinder home to the crankcase, lightly seating the PRT seals into place. There will be a gap of a few millimeters; ignore for a moment.

    18. Rotate the PRT seals on the tubes to place the reference lines straight downward.

    19. Place a 110mm long spacer (cut from 1/2" PVC pipe or conduit), a flat washer, and a nut onto each stud and use them to pull the cylinder fully into position, seating the PRT seals. Once seals are seated, remove the spacers, washers, and nuts.

    20. Install the head gasket.

    21. Install the head.

    22. Install the push rods with assembly lube brushed onto both ends.

    23. Install the rocker arm assemblies running the nuts on lightly.

    24. Clamp rocker arm pivots to remove slack, and torque the nuts in sequence to 10 lb ft, then again in sequence to 15 lb ft, then 20 lb ft, then 23 lb ft, and finally to 26 lb ft.

      [​IMG]

    25. Set the valve lash.

    26. Install the valve covers.
    brittrunyon likes this.