My bike has 12 buttons on the handlebars... or, Are we ruining motorcycling?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by canoeguy, Aug 11, 2018.

  1. canoeguy

    canoeguy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,267
    Location:
    SW Virginia
    Were you able to clean the injectors or did they require replacement?
    #41
  2. no

    no dreaming adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    117,010
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
    I managed to clean them. They weren't that dirty actually...at least 50% of the problem was the goop in the fuel filter. Still, it's the fuel injection system that failed. I suppose the carburetor would have failed under the same circumstances, but here's a data point (my experience) that shows that they can fail at some point.

    I have absolutely no worries about the carb on my DR650. I can have that apart and fixed so fast that it's not even in my radar in terms of reliability. The K75 had me scratching my head for a few days. One doesn't know if it's bad connection in the wiring harness messing up the circuits or even something else altogether like the spark.

    The spark went away once with the DR650, but I had that narrowed down to the trigger on the stator almost immediately. I took the opportunity to switch to a higher output stator from Procycle, and now the alternator keeps up with my Gerbing vest and heated handgrips.
    #42
    portalespeanut likes this.
  3. jfman

    jfman Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,926
    Location:
    Montreal (traveling Americas June '17 to May '18)
    Fuel pumps go out, strainers can clog, .... fuel pump control modules are known to fail on some bike (r1200gs)

    That being said, 9 months on the road on a Vstrom in South America, and all I had to do was clean the strainer on the pump once and it was preemptive maintenance done after seeing dirty fuel in the tank.
    #43
    daveinva and portalespeanut like this.
  4. Steve in Golden

    Steve in Golden Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,108
    Location:
    Golden, CO
    Looks pretty old school to me.

    #44
  5. portalespeanut

    portalespeanut nEARLY nORMAL

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    122
    Location:
    Desert southwest
    To the OP - Amen.

    Being on 2 wheels for 50 years now, I've seen a lot of change. The 'Good old days' were often pretty darn good in some ways...but not always. I remember a particular Bultaco Matador that NOBODY could make run reliably...and yet we were convinced that life couldn't be better. All the old Hondas and Yamahas in the barn were simple, but it was impossible to 'kill' them.

    I go into the showroom now and cringe at a few of the bikes I see. No doubt they're very reliable, and are amazing in performance and comfort, but just like TheProphet said above, I think something's been lost. I see multiple levels of traction control, and ABS, I see bikes with stereos...(of which a potential buyer was complaining about not having room for a bigger amp).

    Ironically, part of the fun of the old 'ancient' bikes for me was the time spent in the shop getting to know them while doing maintenance. I know not everyone feels that way, but I was raised on a farm were we did everything ourselves. Adjusting chains, valve clearances, etc was fun for me, and is a part of the bond we have with our rides. Overhauls...brake jobs...tune-ups...tires changes, we did everything ourselves. I really appreciate...even miss the simplicity of the basic bikes. I also am amazed at the capabilities of the current bikes, and how well they perform, and last.

    In my barn now...is a well-worn XR650R that's plated...and I love it. You want basics?...it's about as basic as they come, even has a quaint kickstarter...along with great performance and reliability. If I could only have one...it's the one for me. Fortunately, I'm blessed have more. My '14 Tiger 800XC is a 'Plain Jane' compared to the OP's GS, but it's amazing to me. I enjoy every mile I've ridden on the thing, it's got soul, and it's been completely reliable. I get lot's of smiles per mile on both of these bikes and am thankful to call them mine.

    I do believe we're living in an amazing time...when the capabilities of the bikes out there are just incredible...but there's great value in remembering our roots too...and appreciating the basics that drew us to two wheels.

    To further confuse things, I'll end with a confession. I'm kinda thinking I should begin to be looking for my 'last bike'...the one I'll ride to 'the end'. If I get the chance, I'd trade the Tiger in a heartbeat for one other bike...A CBX. I know...6 carbs to make you pull out your hair (of which I am in short supply), and was considered very complex and overkill in it's day, but to me, it's iconic...it's something I am able to service and maintain, and it's 'odd'...I've always loved the odd ones. Ok...let's call it unique. I don't fear carbs...even 6 at a time...and I DO believe that it's more serviceable for someone with my skills and history than a bike that requires a laptop to service. Bottom line...there's all kinds of great rides out there...go find your's and enjoy.
    #45
    CCitis, O.C.F.RIDER, DOGSROOT and 3 others like this.
  6. jfman

    jfman Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,926
    Location:
    Montreal (traveling Americas June '17 to May '18)
    Here are posts from riders I happen to follow on FB

    <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https://www.facebook.com/wildfeathersblog/posts/915745885269207&width=500" width="500" height="814" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>

    <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https://www.facebook.com/wildfeathersblog/posts/910005942509868&width=500" width="500" height="789" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>
    #46
    portalespeanut likes this.
  7. Steve in Golden

    Steve in Golden Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,108
    Location:
    Golden, CO
    I have a hard time doing a TB sync with just two throttle bodies. Can't even imagine trying to sync 6 carbs????
    #47
    portalespeanut likes this.
  8. no

    no dreaming adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    117,010
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
    I'm almost at my 'last bike' point, and I've settled with three: A DR650, a DR200, and a CB500X. I could see the appliance (the CB500X) going away someday in favor of a TU250, but this is about it.
    #48
    kojack06 and portalespeanut like this.
  9. portalespeanut

    portalespeanut nEARLY nORMAL

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    122
    Location:
    Desert southwest
    That's a good list. I'll be keeping my XR650R for sure...the CBX is a dream bike for me though, because I was busy raising my family when they came out....but I promised myself I'd have one...someday. Well, with 'The Last Bike' looming closer each day...I'm remembering my promise.
    #49
    no likes this.
  10. portalespeanut

    portalespeanut nEARLY nORMAL

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    122
    Location:
    Desert southwest
    A piece of cake really...it's those laptops that intimidate me...and I work with them and machinery everyday. :lol3
    #50
  11. canoeguy

    canoeguy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,267
    Location:
    SW Virginia
    And let's be honest, a KLR or DR would have been down for an hour or less with a carb issue and kept on going on their trips.
    #51
  12. no

    no dreaming adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    117,010
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
    I have a mercury manometer with two tubes. I suppose I could leave one of the tubes attached to one manifold and then set the other five to match that first manifold, one-by-one. Then double-check afterwards.
    #52
    portalespeanut likes this.
  13. jfman

    jfman Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,926
    Location:
    Montreal (traveling Americas June '17 to May '18)
    maybe.... if they knew their way around a carb.

    Given that I rode to 15,500ft and 0ft on the same day on my trip. I dont want a carb. mid-day rejet? no thanks
    #53
  14. no

    no dreaming adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    117,010
    Location:
    right here on my thermarest
    My DR650 runs strong from sea level to at least 14,000 feet without any rejets. I think they are tolerant enough to altitude changes not to have to rejet. If I were living permanently at high altitude, I would rejet. It ran at 14,000 feet like it had some choke on. I've only richened the idle circuit, otherwise the carb is at the stock (lean) settings. The carb is so simple on the DR650 that if you've ever taken the float bowl off and looked at the jets, you're good to go to fix it easily any time.
    #54
  15. canoeguy

    canoeguy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Oddometer:
    2,267
    Location:
    SW Virginia
    I am not gonna fault you for that. Fuel injection has many advantages in performance no doubt about it.
    #55
  16. sleazy rider

    sleazy rider przemądrzały dupek

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,783
    Location:
    Outta here
    Out in the boonies, I’ll take my sorted DR350. Running around on pavement coast to coast, the ST1300 gets the nod. I’ve pulled a carb partially apart at altitude to get some power back on my old KLR650 while riding in Wyoming. Easy peasy fix and only cost me a 20 minute stop. I had a notion there would be issues, so a small baggie with jets and a working knowledge of carbs got it right.
    #56
  17. barko1

    barko1 barko1 Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,664
    Location:
    PJ Forest
    I was thinking about the simple vs complex thing today. I was out for a little dirt and twisty ride on a KLX250 with knobs and had left the KTM 1190 with TC, ride modes, ABS in the garage and was enjoying myself immensely. I've read a few articles in Rider magazine and have been left unimpressed by the bike reviews (or 3 wheelers) talking about not having to worry about, balance, or shifting, and having a big TFT screen, but nothing about the character, pleasure, and feeling the the bike. I guess Honda has a pretty slick DCT and I wouldn't be bothered or distracted by all that clutching and shifting but to me clean, well timed shifts, up and down, hearing each one and knowing I'm in the exact gear that I want to be in when I want is a wonderful part of piloting a machine. New bikes are great, love the big KTM but sometime the simplicity of 1 cylinder, 6 speeds with a clutch, and two separate independent brakes beats out complexity.
    #57
    kojack06 and William Wolfen like this.
  18. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,354
    Location:
    Dixie
    I took my wife up over Imogene Pass with stock jetting on my KLR. I know it's only 12k ft, but it was 2 up. No problems.
    #58
  19. Johann

    Johann Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,066
    Location:
    Europe
    I went to a local Honda dealers who had two NC750s available for testrides, one manual and one DCT. They strongly pushed the DCT, I gave it a go and can´t argue that it is a very well executed system but for my needs it is solving a problem that just doesn´t exist. Got to love most Japanese where if you can undo the one nut holding the clutchpack together you can swap out a clutch in minutes. The DCT has two clutches, so two sets of friction plates/metals but not sure how easy the access is to work on them. Anecdotally lots of them have gone over 100k miles with no issues so for the majority of riders it won´t be an issue in their lifetime. To me the perfect combo is a hydraulically actuated clutch with standard wet multiplate clutch.
    #59
  20. racer

    racer Long timer

    Joined:
    May 5, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,404
    Location:
    Indiana
    I've owned a couple KLR's, loved them and will probably end up with another when my Africa Twin needs it's first valve inspection. I like the DR650 because it is even simpler than the KLR, however, after a test ride, it just didn't excite me like the KLR.

    The KLR has everything the modern bikes have.......The brakes are too weak to lock up a wheel, so no ABS is needed and 38 horse power doesn't need traction control! Gravity is the most reliable fuel delivery system and when the engine starts to cut out from low fuel, more fuel is right at hand with the flip of a lever. Valves can be adjusted without removing the cams and you can thin the valve shims with a surface grinder or sand paper. Two quart oil change and the air filter is washable.

    IMO, the bikes keep getting better, however, I agree with the OP, maybe we are losing something. Or maybe I'm just getting to be and old codger. Racer
    #60