My concern re: F650gs Twin

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Osm3um, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. Denalidirt

    Denalidirt High Plains Drifter Supporter

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    I think bmw will push the twins in the gs direction singles for dirt and in town. The 650 twin is an entry level bike designed for 90% road use. The 800 ups the anty with more power and a much better suspention for off road use. You gotta have skills to use the 800 as designed. If you new to riding the 650 is for you. Parts for all bikes will be available somewhere so don't worry about the little s---.
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  2. Wildman

    Wildman Long timer

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    Hi Bob

    To BMW, "F650GS" is a brand, not a motorcycle. Each bike to wear the badge will therefore likely be around for some time. It may, as the latest incarnation has, take on different guises in terms of engine size but the fact that BMW themselves recognise it as being irreplaceable within their range should give you a lot of comfort that, barring each incarnation being a trout (and the "658" seems to be anything but), it'll be around for some time to come.

    Good news on the loan! :clap
    #22
  3. Possu

    Possu de-nOObed!

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    BMW generally are not in the habit of short production lifespans. There are exceptions (R1200ST) that didn't sell that well so the plug was pulled to make way for new models.

    They also tend not to completely revamp the bikes every two years as the Japs do with their sportsbikes. Aside from a couple of mods to the silencer, centrestand etc, the R1200GS (for instance) remained unchanged for 4 years, even then, the seats, luggage, screen etc etc are utilised on the '08 bikes. A decent dealer will have no problem supplying service items for older bikes, we recently serviced a single cylinder BMW from the early 50's (R32?).

    The F650GS will share all service items with the F800GS & the majority with the F800S/ST. All are strong sellers, there won't be a problem. :thumb
    #23
  4. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer Supporter

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    +1

    I agree. BMW does not make a habit of short production runs. They usually keep a model around for quite a while.

    BTW, I love my F800GS.
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  5. Wildman

    Wildman Long timer

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    :lol3 :thumb
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  6. Dr. Zaius

    Dr. Zaius It's a mad house

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  7. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    Yes, I admit that it may be rather easily checked (in this case), just by knowing, how many cylinders it´s got. Still not the easiest way to do things in my view, and it leaves room for error, but if someone disagrees, they´re free to do so.

    In general, however, it is important to check your machines model/model year with the VIN number. And it will be enough to do this just once - me I always do it, before I buy anything.

    There are many models, which have only slight differences to the outside, but share almost no common parts. Most of the 2000 or newer versions of the Suzuki GSX-R´s (600/750/1000) are a good example. Without the VIN, you´d really need to be into sportsbikes to be able to tell exactly, which model is which.

    And when the first part of the VIN has changed, it is possible the old and the new wont share any engine parts, or fairings, and most of the chassis and brakes will be different, too. Even if the 1st part of the VIN doesnt change, the colors will, so if you´re misinformed about the model year, you will at least get wrong colour fairings.

    Sorry, if this went off-topic.
    #27
  8. earthroamer

    earthroamer Stuck in Pindadesh

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    Don't let the what the marketing guys named the bike influence your choice. Although I agree that it's hard to figure out what they were thinking when the named these bikes, I certainly don't think its worth all the attention it gets here on advrider. They gave us 2 new great motorcycles and are going to continue the 650 thumper under another name. Hooray!! Get over it.

    One of the nice things about a BMW motorcycle is that they supply parts for a long time. A friend of mine has an older Honda and the dealer won't even change the tire on it. Parts? fugetaboutit. They won't touch anything more than 10 years old. I was in my local BMW dealers a couple of weeks ago and they were working on a couple of old air-heads and a K100 brick. The owner still rides his R69 to work now and then.

    Ride all three and pick the one that suits you best. Your motorcycle will talk to you. Buy me.
    #28
  9. John Ashman

    John Ashman Adventurer Wannabe

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    The 650/2 was, in theory, to be a dumbed down 800GS (complete with a dumbed down name and supposedly dumbed down engine) for entry riders and women. But they screwed up and made the bike better than they'd expected and created almost the perfect mix of super moto and dual purpose bike with a bit more low end torque and better street capability than the 800GS.

    It's basically a case of accidental marketing - when a product is designed for one purpose or target market, generally misses and hits a completely different market. Another example is the Honda Element, Honda Fit and Scion xD which get lapped up by older folks because they're so practical. I think the bike is bloody brilliant for an 'accident'. They should have more such accidents.
    #29
  10. C5!

    C5! Been here awhile

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  11. earthroamer

    earthroamer Stuck in Pindadesh

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    Caveat emptor!
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  12. Denali_va

    Denali_va Guest

    A rose by any other name will still smell as sweet.

    Call it whatever you want, it saves me from the extra money of an 800GS and having to ask for the low seat option and then not even fully utilizing the 800GS's capabilities when all I'll be doing is full time commuting and weekend fire road camping. Heck, call it an F450GS and give me another 2K for farkling. :deal
    #32
  13. dman

    dman Long timer

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    I find the 650 twin very appealing but I actually disagree about BMW's long model runs. Compared to the old "Black mit White" days or even the /5 to /6 to /7 transitions, I think BMW has hade quite a few models recently which have come and gone quickly: K75, all those hideous "Custom" oilheads as well as the 650CS, R1200S .... all quite short-lived.

    -dman
    #33
  14. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    There´s an example from the 80´s, the Suzuki XN85D turbo (1983) which is actually a 650cc, and the 85 refers to the power output. Funny that the Japanese decided to leave this experiment at that, and kept their model names corresponding with the cubic capacity. To most people it is already long forgotten, what the numbers of that model mean, and think its an 850cc.

    But sure, the Germans are free to keep naming their new bikes whatever the way they like. Me, I never really understood the added benefit of those blinker switches either, but then I am not German.

    I agree the name doesnt make the new F650GS a bad bike, not at all.
    #34
  15. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer Supporter

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    This is true I guess. However, compared to other manufacturers, most of BMW's production runs are quite lengthy. As well as the fact that any reputable motorcycle manufacturer needs to weed the problematic bikes out of their line. And what I mean by a good lengthy production run is keeping a bike around for a good while without changing a bunch of stuff on it every year. BMW tends to have the mentality of "if it works then leave it alone." This allows for third party manufacturers to make parts and additions for the bike for an extended time. Hence why the KLR is loved so much. It barely changed from 1987 to 2007.
    #35
  16. John Ashman

    John Ashman Adventurer Wannabe

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    But if you look at the percentages, BMW's bikes are pretty stable compared to the Japanese which often build bikes that are available for 1-3 years and then they're discontinued. Honda apparently decided 'screw it, we'll just make cruisers because those people don't give a crap' or something like that. Then they can make the same POS for 10 years or more. Of course, most high performance bikes really don't need much improvement. They're already well beyond what most riders can use safely.
    #36
  17. Pecha72

    Pecha72 Long timer

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    Dont really know, what is available in the US market, what is not, so it may all look a little different from your perspective. But in fact the Japanese also have plenty of bikes, that have been in production for years, even decades, with only small modifications. Honda Blackbird, Transalp, or Suzuki GSX-F or Bandit (former 600/1200, now 650/1250), Yamaha FJR1300, and the already mentioned Kawasaki KLR650 are just a few examples. And they´ve had similar ´iconic´ models in their lineups since the 1970´s.

    In the European market at least, BMW seem to have been one of the most innovative (if not the #1) manufacturers in the 21st century, as they have totally transformed most of their lineup, and have entered many new areas, that they previously didnt have any bikes in. Like the naked streetbikes, or enduro competition models. They have shown, that they go their own way in design, too, and although it doesnt always give marvellous results, you´ll have to admire their courage to do that. Quite the contrary to the Japanese, who have mostly been copying each other for a long time.

    Sportsbikes are a little different. Thanks to the Superbike/supersport competition series, where they actually need the newest technology all the time, and the marketing (not forgetting the media of course!), who make it sound like the regular street rider would, too, their renew-cycle needs to be very short, or they wont sell.
    #37
  18. DieselDog

    DieselDog Adventurer

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    Yep. The displacement factor is 1/2.6. The price is 40xmodel number. It's pure geniass.
    #38
  19. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Leg Humper

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    Have a lQQk at some of Suzuki's cruisers and you'll see model runs of 20+ yrs. The VS1400 was introduced in 87 & to the unknowing it's basically unchanged motor wise and stylewise since then. They did upgrade from a 4spd to a 5spd in 95/96 (depending upon CDN or US versions), moved the wiring from inside the bars to exterior :patch , rebadged the bike as a "Boulevard" in 05 and changed the seat & hadlebars, but other than that it's not much different from the 87 model.

    AFAIK Honda has done the same with some of the Shadow models (600cc version in particular), How long has the Kawi 500cc cruiser been around??? When it somes to "sportbikes" then yea the Japanese bikes are turned over aprox every 3 yrs or so. I don't mind long model runs as it means having an easier time finding aftermarket "farkles" and OEM parts too

    #39
  20. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer Supporter

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    If we're going on that tip, then chew on this tasty morsel for the BMW GS line:

    The BMW flat-twin boxer engine has been around since 1980. Airhead-Oilhead-Hexhead, yes. But still flat-twin. Virtually unchanged in design. Going fuel-injected in 1993-1994.

    The single-cylinder Rotax engine has been around since 1993, made by Aprilia. Virtually unchanged through its production life. Going fuel-injected in 2000.

    Going to the new Rotax parallel twin 798 cc engine for the F 650 GS this year is only REAL change to the entire GS line since its inception.

    1980-------------------------------------------------------->Present
    BMW flat-twin---------------------------------------------->
    #40