My experience: Ducati Scrambler vs BMW G650GS

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Omad0n, Aug 1, 2015.

  1. Tim_Tom

    Tim_Tom Long timer

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    @giganova Adding a windscreen and changing the bars are the easiest mods to do to any bike, the Scrambler is no different. That shouldn't be a deal breaker on any bike. The off center gauge you can't really do anything about but I've found it is functional and easy to read. It's not like the GS gauge is symmetric anyway. :wink:

    If you aren't using the Sertao to tackle single track and severe trails the Scrambler could be a good option. While the Scrambler can handle some gnarly off road stuff, it is much happier as a road bike than a trail bike. Fire roads are a blast on it though. The low seat height on the Scrambler is actually really nice off road because you can dab your feet easier and it's not as top heavy.
    #21
  2. numbat

    numbat Been here awhile

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    OmadOn, good riders eye view of both bikes.

    I have a Dakar as my little bike and the biggest difference is always singles vs twins.
    The GS is cheap and versatile , it is brilliant on tight bumpy roads where bigger bikes become a hand full, and economical to own and run in a way that none of my Ducatis could hope to come close to.
    The Ducati will always be faster, more power and that twin vs single thing, it will be Cooler, it's a 'Ducati', and like any Ducati it will make you feel twice the rider.
    The GS has 'enough' power, just less than the Ducati, it's as quick in a straight line as a Triumph Scrambler which has power in between these two but 40 more kilos.
    You are not accessing that power if you are using it around 3k, that's a bit unkind to a double overhead cam single, it's just functioning at 3000, getting going at 4000 and goes hard up to 5500 plus.
    The biggest difference you've already discovered, the Duke is not a traveler, the GS is, I did a comfortable 2 week 3k trip loaded after I wrote off my big bike, it was just happier at 120kph/75mph, although unloaded it can be pushed over 160kph/100mph.
    The misconception with this type of bike is their off road ability, despite videos to the contrary showing experts doing amazing stuff on them, they are just off pavement capable trail type bikes. Too big, heavy and under suspended for serious off road riding.
    I also agree that if you ride the two you will just pick one, they are different.
    Glenn.
    #22
    Omad0n and Xtyling like this.
  3. Omad0n

    Omad0n n00b

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    Thanks for the various feedback all. I just took the GS in for some regular maintenance and got a little re-aquiainted w/ it. I think a few things to note:

    • The GS really is a smoother ride, I joked w/ a guy at the dealership that you could probably feel a gum wrapper on the ground while riding the Scrambler.
    • The GS feels like a bike that is (aside from speed) always going to happily do what you ask it. Ride at 10MPH, it's happy. Ride at 50MPH, it's happy. Conversely the Scrambler feels like it wants more out of you. Ride at 10MPH, it wants you to go to 20. Ride at 50MPH, it wants you go 70MPH.
    • I notice the power difference a lot more now, but honestly for general commuting, the GS has enough power.
    • The GS is geared much more favorably to "easy riding." I accidentally took off from a stoplight in 3rd gear. The GS didn't grumble at all about that, it just was slow. Doing that on the Scrambler would've made her mad lol.
    Still, the Scrambler is a fine ride, and really fits my wants/desires well. I just picked up the official side bags (the rainproof ones) and popped those badboys on. It's SUPER nice not having a bag on my back going to work. I'm also going to take a maintenance course so that I'm better prepared for randomness on the road. Wishlist items for the bike still include heated handle grips and a windshield. This is driving the total cost of the bike up, but I'm excited to be making these changes and keep riding it around. There are def. plans in the works for longer rides once the weather starts to clear up next year, and I'm even going to try it out on dirt, cause why not :)
    #23
  4. davecooper

    davecooper Adventurer

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    Thank you very much for this post. It's unbelievably perfect timing as I'm going back and forth between these two bikes (and maybe a few others). Super helpful information.

    Bottom line seems that you can't really go wrong with either which is nice. Love the stock features of the BMW.

    Thanks again!
    #24
  5. Dakar Dan

    Dakar Dan Long timer

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    I remember when I bought my F650GS in 2006. It was a close tussle between that and the Monster S2R (then an 800 air-cooled, similar to the Scrambler). It came down to practicalities then and was a decision I made with my head rather than heart with the BMW including ABS, panniers and heated grips at the time. Jeez, it'd be an even tougher decision today with the much cheaper G650GS available but I reckon the Ducati would nudge it.
    #25
  6. SuchesRider

    SuchesRider Just Do It! Supporter

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    Thank you for this thread. It has been extremely informative. Please let me know what you choose in the way of heated grips, side racks and windshield.
    #26
  7. Dakar Dan

    Dakar Dan Long timer

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    Ironically, the first F650GS bikes (around 2000?) were co-produced with Aprilia, I believe, sharing the same Rotax engine. Making them a close cousin to "Moto Bellisima".
    #27
  8. ywr969

    ywr969 Ye Wilde Ryder

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    i'm not the OP, but i have a national cycle deflector screen on my scrambler; it was left-over from another bike that i sold, so it's definitely not "purdy" by any means, but very functional:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #28
  9. sarhog

    sarhog Ride far...

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    The picture isn't showing up...
    #29
  10. ywr969

    ywr969 Ye Wilde Ryder

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    fixed. thanks.
    #30
  11. ebnelson

    ebnelson Been here awhile

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    My biggest gripe with my '09 G650GS is the terrible 5-sp transmission. So easy to ghost shift. The fuel economy is good, but overall, I miss my F800GS and R1200GS when I'm riding the G650. The G650GS is really dated now. The F800GS needed $2500 in suspension mods to be a good loaded 2up bike, and we're quite light. I'm more of a Multi Strada customer than a Scrambler though.
    #31