My Labrador and Newfoundland Adventure - 2018

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by AdamChandler, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler Ascending n00b Supporter

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    Other than what BB8 and I brought two of (like the jet-boil), I used everything I brought except the tire-change kit and spare oil. The next big improvement for me would be leaving the Kermit Chair home as I could have gone without it and upgrading my sleeping situation from a Thermarest pad + air pad to just one of those but I really do sleep better with both. Ah hat and do 3 changes of clothes (Undies, Socks, shirt) instead of 6 sets. We did laundry every 3 days. I didn't need as many clothes as I had. So that's really about half of one pannier of less stuff I could leave out.

    The Anakee 3 tires would have been a much better choice. I really like those even in rough terrain last year when they came on the bike.

    RE Campgrounds: When people are building decks off their campers, it's no longer a campground. Everyone up there was permanently setup.


    Edit: damn you packed light.
    #21
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  2. JimR

    JimR Been here awhile

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    "It was coastal with the aroma of salty air and some may say the terrain was cold and uninviting." A.C.


    In the year 1584, Breton explorer Jacques Cartier, aptly described the coast where you're not too far from as; "The land God gave to Cain."
    Nice pics, wish I was there.

    Regards, Jim.
    #22
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  3. jeepman63

    jeepman63 daplumber

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    wow what a nice way to spend two weeks. just read the whole ride report.
    thank you for taking me along.
    #23
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  4. texas_aggie

    texas_aggie Been here awhile

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    Great report Adam. How'd you end up making out on fuel between HVGB and PHS?
    #24
  5. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler Ascending n00b Supporter

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    You know, you just reminded me I forgot to add another column to my fuel log:
    [​IMG]

    We rolled into lab City and filled up then filled up again the next morning before leaving. only 40 miles (see column J for miles between fill-ups)

    To Churchill falls was 152 miles, then another 183 to Happy Valley. WE could have done this and arrived in Happy valley on the GS Adventure with 0-5 miles left on our range (which means 20 miles in reserve) or used our 1 gallon of spare fuel so we could have totally skipped churchill falls!

    After happy valley, there's a fuel stop in port hope simpson. Still gravel, after a huge bridge and that was 269 miles, again I get 300-350 miles to the tank so no big deal. The only day I rolled into the gas station with 0 miles range was my last, 342 miles to my tank and I still hadn't touched my spare fuel. I told BB8, well I have 1 gallon of gas, let's just keep going and see how far we can go. I wanted to use the spare fuel anyway!
    #25
  6. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    Nice report. Funny, when I got my first GS in 2004, I had it loaded down like that too. Now, I don't even fill a GL Coyote. You'll figure all that out soon enough!
    #26
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  7. Chips900S

    Chips900S Adventurer

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    Cool report! I was up there rambling around about the same time as you guys, must’ve just missed you in a few places as it seems you went to a lot of the places I did.
    Oh and the reason the women are so attractive in fermont is they ship them in from Montreal and Quebec or so a local told me. He said they make pretty good money for the time they’re up there, if you catch my drift......
    510 was pretty bad when I was up there too, glad the crash didn’t end your trip!

    Attached Files:

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  8. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler Ascending n00b Supporter

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    I'm not convinced I can ever do that. This is my 4th, 2000+ mile road trip and I've camped off the bike 25 separate times in 2 years. This is as light as I personally can go mostly technology gear that I bring with me.

    First Road Trip:...too much stuff.
    [​IMG]

    Second:..30% less.
    [​IMG]

    This is my Weekend camping setup:..minimal as possible.
    [​IMG]

    So on weekends, I lose the top box, switch to a smaller tank bag.

    Day trip setup:..usually on beer runs I'll load up the side boxes then put a keg on the pillion seat.
    [​IMG]

    Off-road camping setup with soft luggage:
    [​IMG]

    =====
    I don't really care less stuff than I did a year ago but I do carry less than I did 2 years ago. The only improvement over last year's packing is switching to really expensive back-packing gear like towels, hats, cooking and sleeping equipment that is significantly smaller. I can fit everything I need to make camp into my 40L Mosko Duffel. Then the side boxes are clothes, tools, space for grocery store runs, technology.

    I always bring a gallon fo water with me as I use it to cook and make coffee. The tank bag if I don't have my top case is my Canon SLR, video camera, mini tripod, battery packs and drone.

    ...and I really actually don't like having things on the bike at all. This is my commuting/off-road setup...I ride with nothing but my backpack on:
    [​IMG]

    If I'm going to be off road all day with friends and we're not camping, I'll just wear a backpack.

    I wish I could bring less stuff. The only thing I overpacked on this trip was clothes. I could have half emptied a pannier if my riding buddy and I didn't duplicate some things but that's just poor communication.
    #28
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  9. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    :thumbup .
    Not criticising btw. At least you're hauling all those boxes and they have stuff in them. I've always been a light packer, so in the days when I had a big bike with 3 Jesse cases on it, I don't even know what I carried. I'm guessing they were mostly empty. I wasn't even camping back then. What a joke:loco:loco:loco

    Now, when you decide to start Traveling.on your beta you'll definitely need to scale back:clap
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  10. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler Ascending n00b Supporter

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    Agreed. I have started researching my options. I think a hammock and sleeping bag is all I can take along with my point & shoot camera. I think that's going to be a huge learning experience for me because our off-road overnights I'll be way happier riding the small bike! After riding the beta a bit now, I don't want to take the GS off road anymore. It's not as fun as it once was.
    #30
  11. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    IMG_20180707_190708609.jpg

    UL camping junk goes a long ways, but don't think a hammock will pack that much smaller than a tent. You choose a hammock for comfort above all.
    #31
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  12. Candubrain

    Candubrain Been here awhile

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    Very good write up, I enjoyed reading it

    Did this route, but starting in Ontario and rode around the entire NFLD coast back in June on a KLR 650, 8,500Kms in 14 Days. Also stayed at the same hunting camp up the 389, really liked that stay.

    Almost lost the bike on the 510, similar situation as you had, (K60 tires). But my license plate fell on on the 510, we carried an extra 1.5 gals of gas, backtracked 20 Km looking for it, but never found it.

    If you end up in NFLD again, go to Christian's Bar in St Johns and get screeched in......Honorary Newfie with legal document.

    Attached Files:

    #32
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  13. theshnizzle

    theshnizzle Long timer

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    Yeah, that’s what I thought....that’s a LOT of stuff. You can pack lighter but it takes a lot of years to figure that out. What tires did you have? You kept saying street tires but to me that means 90/10 which is what I run on my gs650. Yours didn’t look like 90/10?

    What was the van in the earlier pics,was it a support vehicle or something?

    I can understand how it can be hard riding with folks who have a different schedule than you, it can create tension and a feeling of being rushed all the time, at least I think that’s what was happening in your rr. Did you enjoy your trip more once you branched off on your own?

    Next time, try to leave time to camp at meat cove. Good for cbr guy to get there, I did it on a hayabusa in 09. And it’s true, you don’t really NEED an adventure bike for adventures.:D
    #33
  14. black 8

    black 8 coddiwompling motographer

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    thanks for taking us along on this RR... I'll be headed to Maine in the fall of 2019 and may go into NS to ride the Cabot Trail... from the looks of your RR it will be on the wet side...

    :beer
    #34
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  15. Carlisja

    Carlisja A wandering soul. Super Supporter

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    Adam, thanks for a great ride report. This is on my bucket list. Early in the report you mentioned not needing the extra fuel. In retrospect, would you consider leaving that behind as well? As for the sleeping pad, I am a real fan of the Exped SynMat 7. It rolls up to about the size of a running shoe and yet inflates easily via a n integrated hand pump to a full size, 5 inch thick pad with some real trick insulating properties. Try it. I think you will become a convert.

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018MC976/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    #35
  16. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler Ascending n00b Supporter

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    Thanks @Carlisja for the link! I definitely need to lose some space with the darn thermarest pad. it's just too bulky.

    Neither of us needed the fuel. in the post I do show miles between stops. Any GSA can do this without needing fuel. A GS may need it depending on how your average tank is but I hope the excel spreadsheet helps others decide if fuel is necessary or not.
    #36
  17. txbear55

    txbear55 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks, Adam! Great report!
    #37
  18. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way...

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    Great report Adam. You're such a stickler for logging details (like fuel stops and mileage and daily video etc). Makes for a great report that's your style. Just about every 'author' here has his own style.

    Not that it matters really because every one has his own taste for gear and how he camps . . . . here's what I would suggest IF you decided you wanted to pair down your gear.
    1. skip the hammock idea. You'll need trees. Every night. That limits your trip destinations dramatically. And it does not take less room as already mentioned. When I take a hammock it is in addition to my tent cause it sucks to not have the right trees at the right distance in the right camping area.
    2. spend $500 on a good Down sleeping bag. I prefer a 15 degree bag as it's bearable (if opened up) in summer heat, and if I'm near zero degree's, I just wear more insulated clothing inside the bag. A good down bag in the 15 or 25 degree range will compress to the size of a football and be good for just about any conditions you may encounter year around whether in Mexico or Alaska. It's probably the most important piece of gear you'll own when it comes to down sizing. Mine is now 25 years old and looks almost new in spite of literally hundreds of nights afield under the stars, in snow caves, on glaciers at 12,000', etc. Your sleeping bag is more important than the motorcycle you are on. And don't wus out and go 'non-down'. If your down bag is getting wet you are just plain doing it wrong.
      • Note: when I summer camp in the desert I only bring a down quilt from Costco ($20). It's half the size of my bag, and it's more than enough for temps above 40.
    3. clothing - you're on the right track. But go to 2 set's of undies/wicking shirts/socks. Only 1 REI or Pantagonia zip off safari pants. Thin ones!. No swimming suits or shorts, just zip off the pant legs. Do NOT pack a pair of Jeans. And 1 nice T-shirt or collared golf shirt is plenty for just about any occasion you may encounter. Wear one set of undies. When you bathe or sponge bath in the evening, put on the clean set and wash out the set you wore. It will take you about 2 minutes while you're washing yourself up. If it's not cotton it'll be dry before your head hits the pillow at night. Repeat every night.
    4. Lose the DSLR - :2cry Your iPhone will take pics that are 99% as good as the ones you've been sharing with us. I make it a game to see just how much I can get out of my iPhone. The camera/lens are excellent. Remember, it's the Indian, not the Arrow. While you're at it, leave the laptop home too. It'll be there when you return. You can survive the evenings with just your phone.
    Points 2,3 and 4 should empty out your top case and also a bit of your side cases. Remove the top case and leave it in the garage where it belongs. There is freedom in hauling less, unpacking and packing less each day, and gaining an hour or two each night that you used to spend fiddling with electronics.

    It's really not that hard to get your kit down to just 2 side cases and a tank bag. All it takes is experimenting a few times and making a game out of it. One of the best reasons to do this when traveling with others is that both at end of day, and in the mornings, you'll be casually sitting at the picnic table or near the fire relaxing while your guys are fussing and fiddling and trying to figure out the chinese puzzle of where to put the rest of their gear. And instead of being 'that guy', they'll look over at you and wonder what you know that they don't know, and why are you so calm while they are sweating.

    Less is more my friend.

    I also realize a lot of people are just not wired this way and cannot be happy without what they perceive as their stuff. And that's fine of course because we all go for one reason really. To have fun.

    Keep posting brother!
    #38
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  19. JustPlainDave

    JustPlainDave ...just a monkey with features Supporter

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    Fantastic report Adam.
    Thanks for sharing and all the work putting it together.
    #39
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  20. AdamChandler

    AdamChandler Ascending n00b Supporter

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    @Zubb - I definitely won't be ditching my Canon. Smartphones take shit photos. absolute shit and I don't mind being crass about that. If you're looking at this thread on a smartphone, you're right. but I and many others still browse the web on full size displays and smartphone photos look like horse-shit next to my camera. there is not a single comparison point to be made. noise, depth, pixel size, lighting..all shit. The disillusionment the developed world has about smartphone photos being great is because almost everyone reads the web now on 4" screens. It's like going to a Dodge Neon drag race event. The fastest neon at a drag race is still a slow car. If you look at the web as I do 15 hours a day on a 5K display, smartphone photos just look like ass. I use my iPhone to take photos of beer for Untappd. my camera is used for everything else.

    My tent and sleeping bag are extremely small. way smaller than my riding partners' The issue I have is that I carry a Therma-rest fold out pad + an air pad. I've tried each on their own and I wake up in pain and only get 4 hours of sleep. both together and I'll get a full night's sleep. so I carry both. I need to get something that has the comfort of both at the size of just one of these items.

    and like I did with my photos earlier on this page, I don't pack much for weekend trips. If I'm going somewhere for 4 days, I don't need the top case at all. it's just the 2 week trips where that's necessary these days. The SLR is in my tank bag so it's not taking up any space that I hadn't already allocated. the drone is the size of 3 decks of playing cards.




    iPhone:
    [​IMG]

    Canon 5D:
    [​IMG]

    iPhone:
    [​IMG]

    Canon 5D:
    [​IMG]


    iPhone:
    [​IMG]

    Canon 5D:
    [​IMG]

    There's a huge price difference and sensor size between these two devices but I'll never have someone convince me it's worth leaving my camera at home. I only process my photos with clicking "auto" in Ligthroom and straightening them. then I publish to flickr with a water-mark. so no coloring or special changes were made.
    #40