My rides, My bikes a 50 year adventure

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by augiedog, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    Bob thanks for following along. Yes I am planning to follow up on this thread with more ride reports and adventures from my past rides. I also want to try and share some of the things I have learned and some of the opinions on bikes and I have owned and and other trips I have taken. Here are a few pictures of some upcoming trips I will be posting about. Alaska phone pictures 352.jpg phone pictures 353.jpg The Trans American Trail phone pictures 180.jpg

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    #41
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  2. HPPants

    HPPants Been here awhile

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    Many of us have been there and done that with our motorcycles. We all have collectively an unlimited collage of stories, lessons, and memories of our great (and at times.... not so great) adventures.

    And sadly, 99% of those are stuck in our brains.

    We've all said or thought that "I hope somebody is writing this stuff down!"

    Props to you Augiedog, for the follow through. Ride on, man.
    #42
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  3. DesertSurfer

    DesertSurfer Tail sprayin

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    Great memories! Keep writing and riding. And we'll follow.
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  4. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

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    Brings me back to the days when any motorcycle ride was an adventure. The thought of a coast to coast ride was almost unheard of.
    #44
  5. Runwithscissors

    Runwithscissors Runwithscissors

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    Chuck: "Bad decisions make the Best stories."
    #45
  6. NCADV Rider

    NCADV Rider Been here awhile Supporter

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    Augie Dog,

    Thanks for the great story. I look forward to many more. I must be about 10 to 15 years younger. My first long rides were to college, about 150 miles, in 1982 on a 1971 450 Honda. I can really appreciate your discussion about the poor gear and tires. My idea of motorcycle gear in 1982 was a denim jacket, jeans and an open faced helmet. Oh how times have changed.
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  7. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    I rode the sportster till 1978 and traded it to my younger brother for a KZ 750 two stroke Kawasaki triple. One of my childhood friends worked for a local motorcycle shop and he ended up getting a job traveling and working on a factory race team wrenching on a GPZ race team and traveling with Kawasaki. He and I got together and took my 750 and turned it into one of the fastest drag bikes in this part of the country. We spent many,many sunday afternoons hanging out at a local watering hole on the NC , SC state line racing that 750 across the river bridge. It was about an 1/8 long. That old 750 would run a little over 100 across that bridge and that was fast in those days. We widened and extended the swing-arm 8 inches. When I wasn't racing the 750 I was riding dirt bikes in the NC mountains. Here is a photo of the 750 in early years. kz 750.jpg

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  8. MotoRojo

    MotoRojo Adventurer

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    I am following as well, Auggie!

    Those were the days of every ride being an adventure and of fellow man gladly lending a helping hand. Thank goodness that most in the ADV community still live by both tenents.

    And, Bless your dad for passing to you at such a young age his passion for riding. Live on, brother
    #48
  9. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    Thanks for following along. I wish many times I would have taken the time to take more pictures. The few I do have are now very special to me.
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  10. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    The development of the internet over the last few years has pretty much changed the world as we previously knew it. It has opened it up and made it possible to visit, learn and share things we see with complete strangers, family and friends. After the 2nd world war most motorcycle riders were part of a rag-tag bunch of middle age soldiers trying to make up on time lost serving their country. Many came home changed from what they had witnessed and been a part of and had a difficult time adjusting. Motorcycles became an out from everyday life and a way to erase the memories of war. For some, their bikes and their biker buddies became their families. In the 70's as the Vietnam war vets came home a similar thing happened. Motorcycle clubs began showing up associated with many veteran organizations. These became places you could go and be with other bikers and soldiers, talk and socialize. Many bike clubs you see today were formed and still have deep roots in these Veteran groups. In the early 70's Harley seized on this and used it to help build the following of riders it has today. They made the Harley Davidson motorcycle an american status symbol. It don't matter who you are or where in America you are from, when you think Motorcycle you think Harley. I have owned, ridden and worked on, almost every brand of motorcycle around and the Harley's were and always will be my favorites. I say all this to say, no one can dispute what they have accomplished and have done for motorcycling industry in general in America.
    #50
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  11. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    This has brought back so many memories of riding in the late '60s - early '70s!
    Bikes had "character" then...often displayed by stuttering to a stop or shedding parts at high speed.
    Gear had "character" then...leather, denim, cotton. The 3/4 helmet was the only thing that didn't come form a critter or plant.
    Riders also had "character" then, (or soon developed it), after freezing in wet leather & denim by the side of the road, looking for shed parts.
    #51
  12. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

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    my first bike was 1972.I very quickly learned the only thing that kept the rain out was pvc.I bought some kind of pvc yatching jacket before i graduated to a leather jacket years later.I cant remember when but by the time i had my cb500 4 i think i had got a bell full face helmet by then
    #52
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  13. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    After settling down, marrying and having children in the the late 70's most of my motorcycle riding consisted of weekend rides to the mountians or motocross racing or cross country races in North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. My wife's Dad owned several large motorcycle dealerships and he and I spent a lot of time racing and promoting races through his dealerships. Back in those days riders raced as a hobby. There was no money in it. We would take old enduros, strip them down, extend the swing arm, lay the shocks down giving them more suspension travel, install longer shocks and front forks. It was one of those " what won on saturday and sunday " sold on Monday deals. Back then dealers carried 3 or 4 different brands racing and promoting them with local talent by giving them small discounts on bikes and racing gear. In the mid 70's the Maco's, Penton's, and CZ's were the exotic's of the racing world. It didn't take long for the Japanese to catch up. By the early 80's the Yamaha YZ's, the Honda Elsinore's and Kawasaki KZ's were the bikes to have. The Japanese and European Manufacturers poured tons of money into building and racing all types of bikes from motocross to road racing. Motorcycling took on a whole new look and and a new following. phone pictures 350.jpg Old 250 enduro's like this were converted into motocross racers. phone pictures 349.jpg The IT 250 and 400's Yamaha's were the first true cross country racers . Honda soon followed with the Xr's
    #53
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  14. HPPants

    HPPants Been here awhile

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    My first dirt bike was a '79 YZ250 that I bought used in 1986 or 1987. I was 21 or 22 years old.

    I quickly learned that I had WAY too much bike. You didn't ride that thing, you aimed it and hoped for the best. Leaving the trailer with no less than 3 spare spark plugs was completely out of the question. I moved back to street bikes thankfully, because I was going to die with the YZ. Too much testosterone and too much expansion chamber....

    Enjoying the report greatly.
    #54
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  15. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    The engines used in most of those early race bikes had a lot more horsepower than the bikes had suspension. It would take more than 10 years of racing before a rider could go to a dealer and buy a new bike ready to race and be competitive. As bikes got better they got more expensive. Manufactures began seeking out the best riders and offering them big discounts, and contracts to ride their brands. It was the start of the professional racers of the 70's and 80's.
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  16. td63

    td63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks for that!

    And yeah, like the others I hope there's more, tho I'm sure that trip will always hold a special place in your memories.
    #56
  17. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    In the mid 80's motorcycle riders were cast in general into two very different groups. The younger generation liked the speed and excitement of motocross and cross country or hare scramble races. The middle aged riders were more into the cafe style or light weight european bikes, and Japanese cruisers. These bikes were easy to maintain , very dependable. The Japanese technology was taking its toll on the industry and Harley,Indian, BSA, Triumph were losing a lot of customers. After several failed attempts to regain some of their share in the road racing and motorcross markets Harley launched a massive promotional push to have the largest dealer network offering everything from clothing to parts and anything else a motorcyclist might need. With a worldwide dealer network, their own clothing and accessory lines , it wasn't long before they became the status symbol.of the motorcycling world.
    #57
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  18. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    in the mid 90s after a rough seperation and divorce I began touring and doing a lot of long distance riding on motorcycles. It was a way to get my mind off all the problems at home and fill the void of being alone again. It wasn't long before I realized that this was a very diffrent breed of rider than most. Most of these riders thought nothing of riding hundreds even several thousand miles to attend a rally or just to get a meal and socialize with other like minded riders. Endurance riding became a way of competing against other riders. These rally or endurance riders became skilled at mapping and plotting a pre determined route collecting bonus points by taking pictures of historical points, national monuments, road signs, lighthouses, bridges, or any number of predetermined items scattered all thru the US. Most rallys were 12 to 48 hours long with from 50 to several hundred bonuses scattered all over the country. The harder the bonus the more it was worth. It was not uncommon to see riders do 1500 miles in a 24 hour rally collecting 30 or more bonuses. Some of the better known rallys were the Cape Fear Rally held out of Wilmington NC, the Mason Dixon Rally out of York PA, The Butt Lite Rally held by Team Strange, The Beast IN the East Rally, The Land Of Enchament Rally, and the Iron Butt Rally. As more and more riders became intrested in rallies and the bikes used and the modifications done to make them more competitive in rallies. Bike manfacturers began offering bikes geared toward long distance and rally riding Most rally bikes were modified Sport Touring or Touring bikes equipped with extra fuel, roll charts, map holders, Tank Bags, Timing devices and other electronic devices.
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  19. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    IMAG0036_zpsa9a1f3ce rally fz1.JPG This was a bike I built and rode for several years in more than a dozen rallys all over the US. It was a Yamaha FZ-1 sport tourer.
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  20. augiedog

    augiedog augie dog

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    In the late 90's I became interested in Adventure Bikes. I read everything I could find about touring on and off road. I had several riding buddies that had bought large ADV bikes and were really enjoying the off road advantage they offered while still being very capable touring machines. I bought a used KLR 600 and began riding a lot of gravel fire roads and trails in NC and SC mountains not far from my home. It wasn't long before I was looking to do some longer trips including some camping. I talked a couple of my buddies into taking a week long camping and biking trip on and around the Blue Ridge Parkway. We camped 6 nites and rode over 900 miles that week having a great time. We began planning our next trip soon after returning home. Over the next several years I made many camping trips on that old 600 enjoying every one. In 2002 I sold the 600 and bought a KLR 650 from a friend and began preparing it for a trip to Alaska. This is it shortly after I got it. 2002KLR.jpg
    #60
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