My "Sportstour" creation

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by c1skout, Mar 13, 2016.

  1. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    Da frozen tundra eh? 1.5 mile west of Lambeau
    I delivered my buddies VN900 this past Sunday, and the smile on his face is worth all the hours and hours of work. In the pic attached you can just see the classic Howe hard bags I've adapted to the Vulcan bag supports. Once I have them ready to paint, I'll match them to the bike and I'll paint the side bags to match the bike. I think the vintage 70's style faring works well with the cruiser style. jimkathy.jpg painted3.jpg
    the tail trunk style/size suits the bike, came with the backrest and top rack. In the fairing I installed a Pyle Bluetooth/MP3 radio and marine speakers, and a very effective antenna strip inside the fairing. The spots are each 50watt LED Pilot 3.25" in place of the original 4" directionals that were stock on the old Pacifico faring.

    So, like you proved with your project, these old fairings that can be found cheap, and can be updated to be very effective on the right style bikes. I found these ABS fairings can be repaired/modified easily with ABS solvent, ABS plastic stock, a heat gun and soldering iron, and Acetone (which actually melts/bonds ABS).
    #81
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  2. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    That's really sharp! Nicely done.
    #82
  3. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    My winter hibernating is almost done. I changed a few things on the Sportstour so I'll post the updates here, but maybe not in chronological order. I've been wanting to get a tach installed, I had bought a bracket last year and finally got a tach from JohnWestley to install in my bracket. Today I pulled the tank off and got after it. I figured I'd sand and repaint a couple rusty spots on the frame while the seat and tank were off too.
    Here's the frame sanded and masked for the rattle can job to come.
    [​IMG]

    The gauges and buckets trial fit on the bike.
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    Here's some of the rats nest inside the riser.
    [​IMG]

    My speedo had been replaced sometime in the past, so I didn't need to pull the wires all the way from the seat area, just snipped the wires at the existing splices.

    It's bedtime now so...to be continued.
    #83
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  4. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    Once I had the wiring done I wanted to fire the bike to be sure I had it all hooked up properly. I stripped off the masking and replaced the tank, then tried to start it up. It's been sitting all winter and didn't start immediately, and I was starting to wonder if I maybe shorted the tach lead to ground or something and fried my ignition. Then I turned the petcock "on" and it fired right up!:baldy SUCCESS! It works.
    [​IMG]

    The gauge lights don't look nearly that different in real life. I put a new bulb in the tach before I put it together, I think the speedo must be LED because there's no bulb holder on the backside. I didn't have any grade 8 Allen-head 5/16x2 1/2" capscrews to hold the gauge mount, so I used some regular bolts from my stock. I'll grab some Allen bolts next time I'm at the local industrial supply place. With the gauges all sorted I put the 'Jammer back on.

    I also rebuilt my forks. That started because I wanted fork gaitors, and longer forks with more travel. Some members over at the XLforum were compiling info and specs on the various forks that were used on the EVO Sportsters so I tore mine apart to see exactly what I had. Turns out I had short dampers, but long tubes, the standard set-up for a 1200 Custom. I ordered up a set of the longer dampers that were used on the "standard" 883 or 1200. Here's a comparo' shot of the dampers.
    [​IMG]

    You can see how much farther the new damper sticks out of the tube.
    [​IMG]

    I was concerned that the extra travel gained by the longer damper might cause my spring to "coil bind", so I measured some stuff. I measured from the top of the damper to the bottom of the fork cap with the slider installed and bottomed, then I subtracted the length of my preload spacer and figured that was how much room I needed. I measured the free length of my spring, then I decided I'll need to see what happens to the spring when I make it as short as it will be when the fork is bottomed. With a few seconds of thought I grabbed a length of all-thread and some washers and nuts and set about compressing a spring.
    [​IMG]

    I found that I could TRIPLE the amount of preload spacer that I had been running and still not have coil-bind at full compression. Good. Testing completed! I started un-compressing the spring and thought Uh-Oh.......This ain't good!
    [​IMG]

    Lesson learned: if you compress a fork spring that isn't contained in a tube it'll turn into a squiggly bit of junk. Oh well, I suppose I've made pricier mistakes.
    #84
  5. Salsa

    Salsa Long timer

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    No Problimo, you just have a little more damping.

    If you want more travel you can lengthen the damping rods until you get a fuzzy feeling about the overlap.

    Don
    #85
  6. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    Definitely more damping, that spring was so bent up I could barely JAM it in a tube :lol2.
    I'm (obviously) no engineer, so for fork parts I'll stick with tested, factory combinations. My tubes and the dampers I ordered were available together on a factory bike, but not with my factory spring. That's why I tested.

    So anyways, my tubes were bent. Right at the lower tree. I always thought they looked a little off depending how you gazed at it, but I guess I was hoping they weren't. As soon as I dropped them out of the trees it was obvious. I rigged up a wooden fixture and tried to straighten them with a big old press to no avail. So I bit the bullet and ordered a set from the local dealer. I was surprised that the tubes from my dealer were actually less than $20 more expensive than the cheapest tubes I found online, and when they came in the parts guy even gave me a discount :clap!

    I ordered a pair of $7 shock boots to use as gaitors. I dry fit one of my fork legs and put a boot on to decide where I was gonna cut it off, I wanted to be sure the boot wouldn't disrupt all my new found travel. Here's my trail fit.
    [​IMG]

    The trimming of the boot.
    [​IMG]

    While I struggled with fitting the boots I decided the lowers could use some prettying up, so I chemical stripped the old clear, then primed and semi-gloss blacked them. I drilled the top caps and tapped them for 1/8" pipe plugs to make fluid changes easier. I got seals and damper washers from the dealer, but I couldn't get upper fork bushings from them, so I ordered those from the internet, and I had everything ready to go back together.
    [​IMG]

    A bit of Lubriplate on the new seal, I like to pack the void to keep the tiny spring in place.
    [​IMG]

    Bumping the seal in place with a custom driver.
    [​IMG]

    So now I have a set of rebuilt forks. I kept the same preload spacer that I ran last year, I might could have gone with a bit more, but I'da needed a few bulky guys to help me screw the top caps on, and I was satisfied with the spring rate that I did have.
    #86
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  7. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    I had seen some Harleys with mags that had gold paint where mine were black, and I liked the look of that. I picked up some paint, cleaned my wheels well, masked the bare alloy and painted away.
    [​IMG]

    Next I needed to sand out the scratches and machine marks on the bare alloy. I used some emery cloth on a stick.
    [​IMG]

    and finished with 400 paper and a buff with Nev-R-Dull.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the front end all back together.
    [​IMG]

    I haven't settled on what to use for a clamp on the bottom of the shock boot. I'll use a black zip-tie if I have to, but if I could find a silver clamp that looks better than a hose clamp I think I'd prefer that. Opinions? Options? :ear
    #87
  8. mach1mustang351

    mach1mustang351 Long timer Supporter

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    On my Guzzi I run a black zip tie on one side and nothing on the other.... I couldn't find another one and the weather got nice... So it went into service.

    Both options work :thumbup
    :smile6
    #88
  9. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    Maybe I'll do that too, which side did you put the tie on, I'd have to put mine on the other...... That way we'd match.
    #89
  10. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    I had an idea for my boot clamp, but I needed materials. I rooted through my scrap pile and found this old camper vent.
    [​IMG]

    I cut some of the thin aluminum off the vent and set a zip-tie on it to see how much I wanted to use.
    [​IMG]

    Next I drew some lines
    [​IMG]

    then I got out the tin snips
    [​IMG]

    I wrapped the strip around my fork to see how long to make it.
    [​IMG]

    I scuffed the strip with some 220 to dress it up.
    [​IMG]

    I started the zip tie, then slipped the strip under it, keeping the metal seam and the head of the tie at the rear of the fork.
    [​IMG]

    I think I like it. I prefer having something not black there to break up the visual a bit. I'll get the other one installed then look at it for a while before I make a final decision :confused.
    #90
  11. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    I installed some new Avon vintage grips while I had the bike down. I wasn't a fan of the stock grips I was running, but they were better than the gigantic chrome & rubber aftermarket jobs that were on the bike when I got it. I much prefer a thinner grip, and my internet research kept leading me to the Avon Vintage grips as some of the thinnest available for 1" bars. I ordered up some FLASHY ones!
    [​IMG]

    blue with chrome sparkles, like a bass boat! The throttle side came on a black throttle tube, so I used Permatex Ultra-black silicone to glue the clutch side to the bar. The Avon supplied adhesive is white, and I was worried that the bright adhesive would make the translucent grip appear to be a different color. Anyways I broke out the cable luber (I poke the cable through a the corner of a baggie and tape the sheath in place, hang the cable from the ceiling, and pour a bit of ATF in. When the ATF comes out the lower side it's good till next year.) while the throttle side was apart.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If you don't like "fat" grips I can wholeheartedly recommend these. They have other glitzy colors, and even regular old black . Nice grips!
    #91
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  12. drhach

    drhach We can't stop here, this is bat country!! Supporter

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    Nice job on the bike. Windjammers have always been a "form follows function" think for me. You've done the impossible, you've made one look good.
    #92
  13. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    Thank you,
    I'd always agreed with that sentiment, but a few years ago when I dreamed up this project I started digging around on the web and reading on Craig Vetter's website. I even traded some e-mails with the man. I bought a beat up jammer fairing and a mount for an old 650 Yamaha that I had and used it to commute one summer. That taught me that the Vetter worked better for me than the factory BMW fairing on my R100rt. I gained a new respect for his fairings in particular and his lifelong contributions to motorcycling in general. I have to say I do like the look of them now! Let form follow function. I may be biased.

    Now the styling of his top box and bags......
    #93
  14. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Bregan D'Aerthe

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    Great build!
    #94
  15. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    Thanks. It's been working really well for me. I changed to the earlier style "full" front fender, that's been my only mod this year. Now I'm just trying to wear it out!
    #95
  16. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Bregan D'Aerthe

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    Solid mount 1200 Evo, right?
    #96
  17. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    Yep, 98 1200. Nothing done to the motor to my knowledge.
    #97
  18. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

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    How’s that vetter working out for you? I have my eye on one and I’m just wondering what your thoughts are. :ear
    #98
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  19. c1skout

    c1skout Long timer

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    I like it. Don't know how many miles I've ran it right now, almost 20,000? Cold, hot, rain, and some snow. Good enough for some observations. There's not a lot of buffeting, it's better in that regard than the R100RT fairing, no lowers so there's good airflow to keep from roasting when it's hot out. Storage space is good for my needs, replacement windshields are inexpensive compared to some others. Mounts are readily available if you have a bike that was current when the fairings were. If you don't, it's not difficult to build one. Good guidelines for mounting on the Vetter site too.

    The best part is they can be cheap to buy. If you try one and don't like it, back off it goes. My guess is it will seem a lot like your FXRT fairing to you.
    #99
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  20. johnwesley

    johnwesley wanta be

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    Thanks, may stick one on a R75. I think it’s a windjammer II. Came off a CB550. I’ll have to find some mounts if I go that way. I’m thing of going with 70’s style touring accessories