Neduro's Spring Bike Maintenance and Setup Guide

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neduro, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. John2453

    John2453 Back in the northeast.

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Thanks!

    John
    #41
  2. EvilClown

    EvilClown Reality show stunt double Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    19,268
    Location:
    In the shadow of the Uncanoonucs...
    Thanx, Ned! :thumb
    #42
  3. Disquisitive Dave

    Disquisitive Dave Not so wise fool

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Oddometer:
    458
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    Any suggestions on "industrial bearing supply" houses to use? How do you talk to these people? Is there some way to translate motorcycle part numbers to their part numbers?

    :ear
    #43
  4. wrk2surf

    wrk2surf on the gas or brakes

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,713
    Location:
    THE exact center of California/Bass lake/Yosemite
    +1 for anti seize esp. swing arm axel adjusters.... pull all the way out. I had about a gallon in mine once.:rofl
    #44
  5. EvilClown

    EvilClown Reality show stunt double Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    19,268
    Location:
    In the shadow of the Uncanoonucs...
    Don't know about supply houses in your area but most can go off numbers on the bearings themselves or dimensions.

    The yellow pages and Vernier calipers are your friends.
    #45
  6. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    19,021
    Location:
    Fort Collins
    Bearings are usually spec'd by a 4-digit code. Read the number stamped into the race. Other options include 1 seal, 2 seal, and none. Most bearings come with both seals. If you don't want them, they can be easily pried out.

    Sometimes the mfgr fiche will indicate bearing size. KTM does. An example would be the XC front bearings, listed as "GR.BALL BEAR.6906 DDU2CG23S6NM ". Just tell the supply place you want some 6906 bearings with double seal.

    Google to find out what the dimensions actually are.

    Seals are spec'd by OD, ID, and thickness. </B>
    #46
  7. barnyard

    barnyard Verbal tactician Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    15,560
    Location:
    central Mn
    Huh, I actually have something to contribute....

    I lube all my cables with a lube from the John Deere dealership. It's a spray on graphite lube that goes on wet and the alcohol evaporates and leaves dry graphite.

    I do not safety wire my grips. I seem to be in a minority. Knock on wood, mine have never moved.

    Another grip tip, when you find a grip you like, buy a bunch. The dealer may not stock them or they may be discontinued next year. (I prefer soft, full diamond Renthals.)

    Tom B
    #47
  8. Bake

    Bake adventurer

    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Oddometer:
    10,751
    +1
    Dunno if the product still is available, but we used to use some stuff called Dri-Slide. Just a dab will do ya.. if your cable is one of those nylon or Teflon lined jobs, I'd go with zero lube.

    A strange habit I got into when Yamaha made reed-valve bikes that needed every thing sealed better, like points covers..(..I used the yellow 3M weatherstripping :lol3). I wipe a good coating of Vaseline on the inside of the airbox and lid. Particularly on the lid seal. In dusty country, it really collects stuff that would otherwise be on the filter, maybe extending the filter's use a bit.
    #48
  9. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,570
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    If you mean you put Vaseline between the filter frame and the airbox to help seal it and force air'n'dirt thru the filter, instead of around it and into the carb, then I would say damn good suggestion. One that neduro might want to add to his tutorial (if'n it ain't there already... need to check :D)
    #49
  10. meteorpilot

    meteorpilot YEE, ahem. YEEEHAW!

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    72
    Location:
    Indianoplace, Indiana
    Ned,
    You're a freakin' machine! Is anyone else's head spinning? Am I all alone in my world of neglected motorcycle maintenance? Excuse me while I go to the garage to see if any of the bikes need a sip of fresh gasoline or a couple psi's in their tires. Forgive me father for I have sinned...
    Thanks for all the advice and thoughtful links herin. Priceless stuff here.
    I've got work to do! :deal
    mp
    #50
  11. MasterMarine

    MasterMarine Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,356
    Location:
    Now serving just Snohomish County
    You should have written this twice! I cannot count how many times this has saved me from big trouble... or losing a tool.

    All great advice!:D

    MasterMarine
    #51
  12. snoid

    snoid 100% Okie

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    44,769
    Location:
    beaver river sandflats, texas county.
    i can never get the spacer over enough to get a bite with the drift. i've tried wedge style pullers to no effect also.
    #52
  13. neduro

    neduro Addict

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,285
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    I'm not familiar with the wedge pullers. Link?

    Some bikes either have the hub ID close down near one end to keep the spacer from getting wonky, or have something around the spacer that prevents it going much side to side. In my experience, this is typically only on one end (where the axle feeds from), so you have to start at the other end to get a bite. It usually takes a little whacking on the spacer before I can get a good purchase on the bearing.

    Oh, and check for split rings before you beat the shit out of your hub. DAMHIK. :lol3
    #53
  14. snoid

    snoid 100% Okie

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Oddometer:
    44,769
    Location:
    beaver river sandflats, texas county.
    #54
  15. Motojournalism

    Motojournalism motojournalism.com

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,687
    Location:
    Montreal via BC
    You rawk Ned, cheers:thumb

    You know we'd buy it, write a frickin book already!:D
    (Or Adventure Maintenence Techniques DVD?)
    #55
  16. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,570
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    Hi Ned,

    Two things for you:

    I have a WP-specific maintenance guide on the USD forks HERE. Your fork oil change thread was a big help but there were a few WP issues that needed to be addressed so I herded them up.

    And I was wondering what you thought of Motion Pro's ForkTru.

    [​IMG]

    HERE is their ForkTru guide. Not sure why you would need their spiffy gloves for this job... :lol3

    Didn't find a review of the ForkTru, but Motion Pro's reputation is good. Just wondering what you thought. And thanks for sharing your knowledge and writing up this guide. :beer
    #56
  17. Capt_Aubrey

    Capt_Aubrey Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Oddometer:
    127
    Location:
    Livermore, CA -- 1100 miles west of Spoonbooty
    The poster who stated that (for dirt bikes) hours ridden = hours spent on maintenance is absolutely right. This is forcing me to take a hard look at my garage/shop organization in order to get the most done in the time available.

    So -- how do you guys organize your shop space? Any particular recommendations for tool storage, solvent/lube storage, etc.?

    My bike maintenance gets done in the same garage/shop space that is a dedicated cabinetmaking/woodworking shop (the bikes are stored elsewhere). I'd like to find tool storage solutions that get everything off the floor (maybe wall-mounted?) because floor real estate is at a premium.

    I've also learned that I have to be utterly ruthless about what I allow in the shop. If it doesn't make sawdust or maintain bikes, it goes elsewhere, or in the garbage.

    So how do you guys maximize the efficiency of your shop space?
    --
    Mark
    #57
  18. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    19,021
    Location:
    Fort Collins
    You'd have to see my garage to understand. The best analogy is a fighter cockpit. At the main work area, everthing is with a one step reach. Some things pivot down from ceiling mounts.

    Rather than go into too much detail, I'd suggest moving this part of the topic to The Garage. I think they even had a thread on this topic.
    #58
  19. neduro

    neduro Addict

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,285
    Location:
    Colorado Springs, CO
    :thumb

    You know, I've never bought a tool from Motion Pro I didn't really like. So, I'd be more than willing to give it a shot, though I'd never heard of it either...
    #59
  20. Denn10

    Denn10 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    109
    Location:
    SoCal High Desert
    Lemme throw something is since i saw that pic of you lacing up the grips. Ive laced many a MANY bolts and things on engine to include grips BUT thats the past with grips. I dont lace/safety wire them anymore!! Dont know why i never started doing this back when i was in high school but i used to work at a golf course all thru high school and if you dont know grips on golf clubs arent safety wired at all, and the DONT MOVE EVER. You talking about two hands on them gripping and swinging like Happy Gilmore and they DONT MOVE, thats cuz there installed with double sided tape, several kinds out there like double sided masking tape and others that are stronger adhesive. I have some tough stuff that i use for installing grips and dont wire and havent for many years now. What you do is install the tape on the bars and cut to the length of the grip and use a little gas (not 2T gas) straight gas and put inside grip and cover with thumb and shake it up a little to cover completely inside, Now take and pour the excess over the tape starting at the end and working in. Now take the grip and slide on! goes on nice and easy cuz it softens the adhesive on the tape. Easlily slide around to get it right where you want it and let it sit over night and WALLA your done, SECURE, and no need for lacing. Anyone who plays golf will attest that golf club grips are rock solid and dont move. I believe this is supperior over most grip glues and safety wiring grips. We all have the tails catch gloves and stuff. Just thought id share this with ya all!:beer
    #60