Neduro's Tire Changing Class

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neduro, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. Pete in PA

    Pete in PA Yamahaullin Now!

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    After holeing 1 tube 3 times with my tire irons, MY way is to DEFLATE the tube COMPLETELY and put inside the tire. Then you can actually sort of fold it away from the rim you are prying on. NO HOLES.

    Be sure to inflate, deflate and repeat to seat the tube correctly after setting the bead.
  2. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    My method involves less equipment but needs some flexibility & getting rather intimate with the bike, & isn't for those flash harrys with a table lift stand, but it works - sit on the ground behind the rear wheel, put a heel in front of the wheel then roll the wheel up onto your foot & into position while chocking behind the wheel with the other boot. This lets you control the height of the wheel with both hands free to manage chain, caliper, spacers, axle etc.

    Cheers
    Clint
  3. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    :thumb That's what I'd done in the past. Wedge was sitting on the garage floor, and was even easier (or I just got lucky). :beer
  4. Dakar Dan

    Dakar Dan Long timer

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    Had an interesting time re-tyring my WR with Bridgestone M403/404s in the shed recently: thought it was all going a bit too well (under an hour, no swearing), when I ran into an issue where I couldn't seem to get one bead of the front tyre to seat correctly. Tried removing, remounting, deflating, reinflating, relubing, checked for no pinched tube, rimlock working properly and not fouling beads etc, etc, etc.

    Turns out that only one side of the front tyre had the molded "seam" that pops out when fully seated. The other has the definite lip and actual bead, but I was looking in vain for the seam that wasn't even there! The rear tyre has no seams on either side between the bead and shoulder of the tyre. Note these are "Not for highway use" MX type-tyres. Now on, balanced, seated and loving the dirt.
  5. pHelix

    pHelix Eternal n00b

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    Amazing to see how this thread is still going strong after almost eight years! :clap:clap

    Now that I've read every post, I'm ready to give it a try.
    One question though from a tire-changing noob: How do you all dispose of used tires? Is there such a thing as tire recycling? They sure as heck won't fit in the trash can... :D

    Thanks all!
  6. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Our dump will take them for a $5 fee (or you can wait for the once-a-year free day). Many municipalities that have curb side pick up will have some sort of surcharge sticker that you can purchase.

    If not, check in with a local dealer and see if you can give it to them for whatever the recycling fee is.
  7. silverboy

    silverboy Bunny

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    I put them in a tall pile in the corner of my garage. It is a good reminder of how much riding you have done:1drink
  8. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    I think it is still going largely because thankful noobs like me, having successfully managed to change our own tires after getting encouragement here, post to thank Ned and the other contributors offering advice.

    I changed my first tire this Spring, and have done a couple more since. I still can't say I have a method, or even that I follow any single procedure, but rather, I think I have gained a notion of the basic dos and don'ts:

    - buy good tire tools
    - keep the off-side of the tire down in the well
    - if it is really hard, I'm doing something wrong, so I back off and regroup
    - add a little air to the tube before installing it to keep it away from the tire irons
    - use diluted dish-soap when the going gets tough
  9. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    In Ontario, we pay the $5 disposal fee on the purchase price, so the recycling is "free", and there is less incentive to improperly dispose of them. The drop-off site can't know whether the tires were purchased in Ont. with the fee, so even if I purchase a tire from Rocky Mountain ATV or Motorcycle Superstore, they will take them for recycling without charge.

    I would guess many bike shops would accept them too. I return our used motor oil to Canadian Tire for recycling, and they don't complain.
  10. Starchamp

    Starchamp Rebel Scum

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    Bump for such a great thread; I'm subscribed, but others may not know about it. Surprised it's not a sticky or how-to or something. I refer back to it every time I find myself struggling on a tire.
  11. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    I recently installed a Wolfman Enduro Tool Bag on the headlight cowl of my WRR. It uses a bolt-on Velcro base, along with straps. Since I don't always carry the tool bag, I wanted a cover for the Velcro so it didn't get clogged with bug-guts and lose it's grippiness.

    I cut up a bleach bottle to make a rectangle of plastic, added Velcro and use it to protect the Wolfman base when not using the bag.

    It looked kind of plain, so I added the decal I got when I ordered Double Take mirrors last year.

    Thanks Ned, for the mirrors and the tire changing advice!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  12. ktmbmw

    ktmbmw Not ridden in a while... I shall return.

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    Nice idea, thanks.
  13. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    Time for a bump! :clap

    I won't bother you with my romantic story of anger, frustration and hate being transformed into satisfaction and bliss as my day-long relationship (wrestle) with a TKC ended in the most intimate way possible, when a large, super duty, thick tube filled that lubed up tyre deep from the inside to a point of that joyful "PPPOP". :evil

    And the people to thank are Neduro himself and toolman (see http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=458452). :deal

    PS. If you've never encountered wheel innards before, check pictures from this page - http://www.africatwin.ru/download/bortirovka/
  14. Y E T I

    Y E T I Unpossible

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    Thanks Ned for doing this so many years ago! :clap


    In all my years I've never had a flat on a dirt bike (**knocks on wood**) so I've never done it. Always had my local shop do it when I bought the tires from them. Decided to do it myself because, well, I figued I'd better know feckin' how. Overall, not too bad, the key is keeping the bead in the center of the wheel!

    Thanks again Ned! :bow
  15. neo1piv014

    neo1piv014 Garden Variety ADV

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    Hey, Ned. If you're ever in the NM area, you've got a beer owed to you in Albuquerque. After pinching a couple of tubes, reading your post got it taken care of in ten minutes flat.
  16. Stumblebike

    Stumblebike Adventurer

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    Great How To but I am still a Muppett:muutt
    I had a fun day last week rode out of the bush to the pub figured that light less insects and a floor would help the tyre changing experience.
    so i got the front tyre off the rim without to much drama. Then stuck the spare tube in without to much trouble but it pinched a neat hole in it .
    Tyre came off again pretty easy.
    went back on found i hadn't fixed all the holes but didn't pinch it.
    Changed it a third time and pinched it again.
    Time to wait till morning strap the tyre on the back of the other bike and ride to salvation and a tyre changing machine.

    I stuck air in before leavering the tyre back on. Not a heap of air but it was inflated to its shape. No lube

    Is there any more tips to avoiding pinch flats? :ear I felt inside the tyre each bite seeing if the tube was in the way.
  17. sTE610vE

    sTE610vE First on the brakes, last on the gas... Supporter

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    Tire lube makes it so much easier that your aren't fighting friction of the bead on the rim and the levers. I have one of those small flip top travel type shampoo bottles that i carry lube in on the bike. It's about 3 inches long by 1.25 in diameter, plus you can use it to clean your hands when your done.

    Use the hooked end of the tire irons to take the tire off and the straight end to put it the tire back on.

    I always round out the tube with a little air before I put it in the tire, then insert the valve stem in the rim, and then let the air out before using the levers.

    The other best piece of advice is take your time, I've seen a lot of guys get in a hurry because they don't want to hold up a group and they pinch a tube and have to start all over. I don't know how many times I've heard "is the compressor working?" it is always working you pinched the tube.....

    Another tip is always carry a rag, it's the best way to check the inside of your tire for a sharp object that may still be in the tire. Wad it up inside the tire and then drag it around the tire anything sticking through should get caught on the rag. You can find very small thorns, rocks or whatever still in the tire that way.

    I assume you are keeping the bead in the drop area of the rim opposite of where you are using your levers as you work the tire on.

    When you get the tire back on push the bead down and look to see if the tube is caught under it anywhere around the tire, if it is you can usually grab the bead on either side of where the tube is caught and lift it up so the tube can pull back in the tire.

    When you are in your garage use a 5 gallon bucket to put the wheel on the open end of the bucket, it gets it up off the ground and makes it easier to work on. Put some sand or water in the bucket if you need to stabilize it, but it's usually not needed.

    The best advice is one that nobody ever wants to do, Practice. I'm pretty good at it because I spent several summers as a kid changing tires in the "Yamaha Shop", and yes I pinched my fair share learning how not to do it.:becca

    Some tires are just a lot tougher to mount than others, stiffer sidewalls or whatever, Dunlop D606 and Pirelli MT-21's have always been easy tires to mount in my experience, Michelin T-63 and Dunlop D908 (rear) are tough to mount in comparison.
  18. victor441

    victor441 Long timer

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    use zip ties, nearly impossible to pinch a tube that way and the ties can be reused too, the locking tab can be released w/ a small screwdriver (learned the method here in an old thread and am completely sold on it...) The tube is inflated just enough to round it out, placed in the tire, the zip ties force the beads together, both are mounted at once and then the zip ties are removed after the valve is through the rim hole...and always use tire lube or soapy water, makes the job much easier and avoids damage to the tire, rim, tube, etc...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  19. Datan556

    Datan556 2stroke a day keeps the doctor away

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    Any pointers on changing it without the use of tire irons? Screw drivers?
  20. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer Supporter

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    Use a screwdriver to break the piggy bank and go buy a couple of tire irons.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2