Neduro's Tire Changing Class

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neduro, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. knybanjo

    knybanjo kinda slow

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    None.
  2. Turtletownman

    Turtletownman Been here awhile

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    Street tire beads can be hard to break. I use a big C clamp. There is a cheap tool which is a steel cord with a male thread on one end and piece on the other end with a core remover. Attach it to the valve stem and use it to pull the stem through the rim especially with my clumsy hands and small tires. Street tires don't have rim locks-one less thing to mess with. Street and dual sport tires I've never been able to seat a bead without 60 or more pounds and thus use a compressor.

    Bob
  3. knybanjo

    knybanjo kinda slow

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    Are you sure about that? I have an old XS11 that has dual rim locks on the rear wheel...from the factory.
  4. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

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    That was an exception. Factory drag bike.
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  5. 2manyrides

    2manyrides shifty charactor

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    In no certain order, here’s tires on my warp nine wheels that I got for my plated 91xr600r.

    You see 606’s... they never got balanced on there. And the wear they recieved. So when the mt 21’s went on I balanced to offset the bead lock. Next is a set of IRC tr1 trials dualsport tires. Coming up on a change any week now.

    First bike in 74, I have never had some one else put a tire on for me. Generaly have always had 3-5 up and running bikes, so there are tires to change. It is helpful to have three hands... a buddy to hold the third iron.

    Can’t say I have never struggled with a change, but I don’t damage tubes. Why not a new rim band and tube when doing a change at home?

    I have driven over forty miles on a flat that was caused by ripping the stem off the tube spinning the wheel on a wheel without bead locks.

    Here is a shot of alternative bead locks on sun rims... other dirt wheels that I have, have had 5 holes drilled in each side of the rim for sheet metal screws to run through and on into the tire bead. (old school stuff...) lock your bead without all the off balance shinanigans. These pressed in spikes make things a bit tougher to set the bead evenly all the way around. Soap and high preasure alone will not do it. You need to bounce it, infate, deflate, ect...

    I just read this whole thread over the last few days. Hard to believe there are so many leary riders out there.
  6. Sharkdog

    Sharkdog Diggin It.

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    This thread is still infinitely useful. First time I changed a motorcycle tire...done.
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  7. motogoat

    motogoat Been here awhile

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    Thanks Neduro. Your advice, photos, and detailed write up are very useful!
  8. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    Been a while since i read the entire thread, but don't recall discussion of placing the nuts on the valve stem (if there are 2 included). There are diametrically opposed viewpoints in this thread. Putting a nut on the inside of the rim just looks so wrong, but seems to be a manufacturer recommendation. What is the point?
  9. RMac

    RMac Cheese!

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    Like Don Coyote above, it had been awhile since I read this thread or since I had to change a tire. Yesterday I just jumped right in to tackle the 150/70 x 17 rear on my red bike without re-reading the basic steps. WTF was I thinking?!:lol3

    Here's a few things that if I had re-read the steps and done it right the first time would have saved my aching back and busted knuckles some pain and heartache.
    1. Let the tire sit in the hot hot sun for a half hour instead of the air conditioned basement.
    2. Use WD-40 for lube, instead of weak dawn & water.
    3. Put the tube in the tire, inflate slightly and run the stem through the rim first, not after you get the 1st side on. You'll never get your sausage fingers inside the tire to get into the hole otherwise. Unless perhaps you have tiny fingers like a certain public figure.
    4. Make sure the tire is fully inside the rim and not out on the bead before mounting the second side.
    5. Re-inflate slowly and use WD-40 to ease the re-seating of the bead. If it's doesn't re-seat properly, deflate, break the bead, let it sit in the sun and try again.
    and most importantly:
    6. Take the freaking thing to a shop and pay them to do it, you cheap bastard! You coulda been drinking beer and watching baseball.:D
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  10. 2manyrides

    2manyrides shifty charactor

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    Ha!
    Get a tv for the garage or listen to the game on the radio. Bring beer from the house or get a cooler.

    Some tires can be tough to do... I can admit. But I have never paid anyone, or had it done in the shop. 50 years of doing it the old fashioned way.

    Try getting the bead right with these rim locks on my triumph!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    But, I admit, this thread is of help for some great ideas.
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  11. mf13368

    mf13368 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Before I start grinding - My Dad (80) was cleaning out his shop and found an old tire iron that was my grandfather's. He was a farmer, jack of all trades but mostly a John Deere tractor mechanic. The iron is about 30" long, 3/4" diameter with a 1" spoon on one end and 5/8" on the other. There is a small lip on each end. I took it to use on moto tires. Should I take the lip off or leave it? Seems like it could pinch a tube but also might be useful to catch/hold the rim.
  12. jon_l

    jon_l Long timer

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    @mf13368 - A very small lip is nice.

    That is a big tool, and will provide a lot of leverage. Might be too easy to damage a motorcycle rim.

    Maybe cut it in 1/2 to make 2 reasonable-sized irons. Or better yet, buy a couple Motion Pro irons, and hang the big one on the wall unmolested, because it was your grandfather’s.


    A903076A-618F-4A5E-AA10-322B26A7ED7C.jpeg
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  13. Bengt Phorks

    Bengt Phorks Been here awhile

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    I leave one nut inside the rim on the valve stem and the other one screwed up against the valve cap.
    Another thread about this explains it better: https://thumpertalk.com/forums/topic/868589-2-nuts-on-tube-stem/?tab=comments#comment-9029384
    Edit: If you run low pressure the tube could spin and drag the stem into the tire and then you won't be able to deflate the tire to fix it. The nut stops that from happening.
  14. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    That thread is the one referred to at the beginning of the one I linked to. The only explanation I see for the nut inside the rim is to keep the outer nut from ripping the stem out if you over tighten it against the rim, but most tubes have a curved metal washer around the base of the stem that would prevent that and conventional wisdom is that you shouldn't tighten an outer nut anyway or you increase the risk of ripping out the stem if the tube spins.

    I don't see a plausible reason for the inner nut anywhere...
  15. k-moe

    k-moe Long timer

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    Jam nut, so the outer nut (now nuts) can't back off from where you set it. :deal
  16. Don Coyote

    Don Coyote Long timer

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    By inner nut they are talking about putting a nut on the stem between the rim and the body of tube, inside the tire.

    A single nut backed up against the cap should jam both in place pretty well, right?
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  17. dhally

    dhally Hammerhead Supporter

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    Woot! Neduro's thread to the rescue again!

    I just put a Shinko 705 on my Husqvarna 701. It is a 150 not a 140 and a tubeless design but I use a tube. It was so hard to get off and on I thought I had forgot how to do it, and had to re-read this thread. It's on now, hopefully no flats since it would really be a bitch on the road.

    Minor comment - I got one of those valve stem threading tools - works well. I haven't tried putting the tube in the tire before mounting the first side.

    [​IMG]
  18. dhally

    dhally Hammerhead Supporter

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    Help! I'm trying to remove the Shinko 705 rear, and I can't get the second side off the rim. Thus tutorial doesn't give much detail on that. Please throw me a lifeline before I get out the hacksaw...
  19. Mat

    Mat Long timer Supporter

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    If you end up using the hacksaw, remember to use a metal blade for the last bit.

    DAMHIK

    :lol3
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  20. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    On a tire with a stiff side-wall it can be difficult, so pay attention to the details....

    Option 1 - on one side of the rim, push the mounted edge into the gutter in the center of the rim. Get 3 tire irons (not absolutelynecessary, but it can help). On the opposite side of the rim from where you have the bead pushed to the center, lock one tire iron in and leave it. Start walking the other two around until it comes off. Oh, and use tire lubricant of some kind - Windex works for me.

    Option 2 - give up and bring it to a dealer...live with the shame.
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