Neduro's Tire Changing Class

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neduro, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. neduro

    neduro Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,333
    Location:
    Salida, CO
    On a wheel with a single, 8-10 oz rimlock, I think any balance issues introduced by the tire are probably noise level compared to that introduced by the rimlock. I've never worried about dirt bike tire balance- I do run two rim locks on my XR wheel, to prevent the tire spinning on the rim, which one would think would improve balance, but I sure couldn't tell a difference.

    On a single cylinder dirtbike ridden off-road, I really don't think balance is a serious issue. But some might argue with me and more power to them.
  2. Pantah

    Pantah Jiggy Dog Fan Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Oddometer:
    13,290
    Location:
    Scottsdale Arizona
    I want to thank Neduro for this thread too. Up until I read it, I had hever successfully spooned a tube tire flat....even back in the day :nah . But after reading the thread, I went out and pulled some studded knobs off a dirtbike and refitted standard knobs. I huffed and puffed and holed the first tube :knary , but practiced a couple times with the 2nd tube successfully. I was stoked...:rayof

    With my confidence up, I went at my KTM950. After solving the bead breaking, I found the tire removal easier yet because of the wide center well in that big rim :dj . The main lesson for me in Neduro's lecture was to be patient enough to make sure the loose bead was properly in the well. He said it should come off/on without much grunt, so when I felt I was using too much force, I just stopped and slipped a little more loose bead in the well with a lever or my heel. Sure enough, she went right on with little force or chance of pinching the tube. I practiced some more by breaking the bead and pulling one side off and removing the tube as if I was doing a road side repair. It wasn't ISDE speed, but wasn't that long either. I feel now I can fix a flat on the trail and be on my way within an hour. :thumb Thanks for that. -P
  3. neduro

    neduro Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,333
    Location:
    Salida, CO
    Really glad to hear this has helped some folks. Right on! :thumb
  4. scootertrash

    scootertrash Mobile Homie

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,074
    Location:
    "My leg's tired, let's live here."
    I'm getting ready to take a run at this and would like to do it the Neduro way with a minimum of fancy equipment. I lucked out and got the "chore" of storing my dad's brand new compressor indefinitely.:evil Are there any tire irons that stand head and sholders above the rest that I should get? What about the bead breaker? one of those fancy clampy looking things or a Big C-Clamp? I have those.. Are those rim stops that hold the bead from jumping off the rim any good? Here's one: http://kientech.com/beadstop.htm
  5. dieter von hexhead

    dieter von hexhead I made a doodie...

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,203
    Location:
    Phoenix,AZ.
    finished product.....

    [​IMG]

    and the second time mounting the rear was even easier.....



















    (don't ask) :lol3
  6. murgatroid42

    murgatroid42 Great Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,186
    Location:
    Ft. Collins, CO
    Did you put it on backwards? :evil
  7. murgatroid42

    murgatroid42 Great Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,186
    Location:
    Ft. Collins, CO
    The best tip in neduro's tire changing is to add a little air to the tube before putting the tire on the rim. That and a little unscented baby powder, and the tube just fits very well without kinking or strubbling to align it.
  8. dieter von hexhead

    dieter von hexhead I made a doodie...

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,203
    Location:
    Phoenix,AZ.
    I was mounting Rally Raids (new tire to me) and I go to look for the
    "directional" mark on the front tire and nothing. I'm thinking "nice to
    not have to worry about that, maybe I'll even turn them around later
    to get a little extra mileage" After I'm all finished and going to mount
    them back on the bike I see that unlike the front the back does have
    a "directional" mark. Good news was that the second change took half
    as long as the first.... :lol3
  9. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,723
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    Phew! I thought you were gonna say you remounted it to make the tire label and the rim label line up for a pic! :lol3

    OK, in all seriousness, I hear that front knobbies don't usually have directional marks because they are not directionally reinforced (some folks reverse them to get a fresh knob face midway thru their lifespan). Some front tires are, I guess for braking forces. Rear tires are reinforced to deal with the forces from acceleration; reverse them at your own peril...
  10. neduro

    neduro Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,333
    Location:
    Salida, CO
    Keep us posted on how those things work, eh? They look good, if the skinny knobs don't flex too much...
  11. murgatroid42

    murgatroid42 Great Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,186
    Location:
    Ft. Collins, CO
    The D606 front is directional. I found out when I noticed my tire was mounted in the wrong direction - 4 months after the local Honda dealer mounted them for a large sum of money. :pissed
  12. JOKER650

    JOKER650 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,013
    Location:
    British Columbia , Canada.....Eh
    Am I missing something here?
    Do you install the tube in the tire before you put the first side if the tire on the rim??
    [​IMG]

    I have never done it like that before. I have always installed one side of the tire(with the rim lock in place) then install the tube then air it up a little then the 2nd side of the tire ending at the rim lock. I have done it like this since the 70's.........what am I missing?:huh
  13. eastCOeric

    eastCOeric Adventure Cruiser

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    123
    Location:
    Eastern Colorado Plains
    Good point. How about D/S bikes or those who plate their dirtbikes?

    Thanks Neduro!
    PS - are you going to put on another riding clinic sometime? I couldn't make the one late last year, but it sounds great! Thx.
  14. neduro

    neduro Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,333
    Location:
    Salida, CO
    Both ways work, as you know, but I think getting the tube lying flat in the tire ahead of time is easier and faster. So yes, I put the tube in the tire, then put the tire on the rim.

    Unless I'm doing 2 rimlocks or the tire is really fuggin' stiff (739 A/T Desert), in which case, I do it your way.

    Personally, I never bothered to balance my sportbike tires. Others shudder in horror when I reveal this, but it never bothered me. :dunno

    That said, I machined my 950 rear wheel unevenly and have come to the conclusion that this was not a good thing to do based on newfound peg vibes, and that I need to add weight to straighten it out... so maybe I'm turning over a new leaf.

    Regarding a clinic- yes, I'm thinking about doing another one soon. Watch for a post in "rockies". :thumb
  15. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,307
    Location:
    San Francisco
    bump

    Just got around to re-reading this thread and realized that I alway take the tires off from both sides, leaving the rim in the middle and then pull it out while flexing the whole tire upright. Much easier IMO than trying to reach over the tire from the back-side.

    Thanks again Ned. A little review always helps!

    -dubb
  16. neduro

    neduro Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2003
    Oddometer:
    12,333
    Location:
    Salida, CO
    I've never tried that, but it sounds like a great idea! Next tire, I will. :thumb
  17. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,307
    Location:
    San Francisco
    With 21" front tires, I put 'em back on that way too. Doesn't work so well on bigger rears. Too hard to squeeze the rim down into the center while twisting the wheel into place between beads. Easier with used tires than new ones.:1drink
  18. Zen Slug

    Zen Slug Spineless Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,086
    Location:
    Near Vana
    R-dubb,

    Can you tak a pic of this and post it here sometime? I am not sure I understand exactly what you mean.
  19. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,307
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I'd be happy to, but it could be awhile since I now have fresh meat on three of four rides.

    Real simple though.

    1. Press off the first bead, just like always.
    2. Flip the wheel and press up the second bead same as the first.
    3. Stand the tire up; push the rim into the bottom of the tire; then twist and pull the wheel out from the center. To do this, you push down on the tire with one hand, and pull the rim to the side and out with the other.

    Really easy with big skinny tires. Get's harder to manage with smaller, wider rims (just like everything else).
  20. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Oddometer:
    5,307
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Here is a 21" tubeless tire going onto my brand, shiny new GS rim.

    [​IMG]

    In through the middle. You run your fingers around the bead as you push down on the upright wheel. I use a little soap. No tools required.

    [​IMG]

    You see the rim pushed in all the way with the tire flexed to one side. The bead will slip right over since the wheel is recessed pretty far.

    [​IMG]

    Now the bead is pulled over the outer rim, and rim is centered inside the tire. At this point, you lay it down, pull the bead onto one side. Flip the wheel, and do the exact same thing on the other side.

    [​IMG]

    From start to finish the install took me less than 10 minutes including photos, seating the rim with compressed air and refilling. A tube adds a little complexity, but makes no difference if you place the tube inside the tire according to Ned. The valve stem goes at the bottom as you push the tire between beads. If you have a rim lock opposite the valve, I leave the valve at the bottom and slide the rim lock through the bead from the side and then up at the top.

    -dubb