Need Help in Costa Rica - Bike impounded

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by krl, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. pepelopez

    pepelopez Been here awhile

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    what got him in trouble was coming in through sixaola, that's not a drive in crossing, it's a walking bridge, just because you can drive a bike on it, don't mean they are used to it, so the yahoo truly was unconscious on what to do, so it all looked good to him...normally, that word again..you would go to the border, hand in your TVP or what ever you want to call it, and they hold it for you to come back through and get it, they don't have it set up for our convience of motoring around the world, they give you 90ish days, so you have time to get it imported, why else would you drive in? tourist fly or take a bus, most don't drive in, so they don't make the laws with us in mind.:evil
  2. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    I'm starting to understand better: the trouble started because an inexperienced or ignorant guard at a nin-traditional border.

    Many of my questions were curious about what was the cause, so that I could identify and avoid reproducing.
  3. westnash

    westnash Long timer

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    Makes sense then and a good lesson for all the readers, even at the expense of the guy with the problem.

    2 lessons then:

    1. Insure the paperwork is correct and you have everything if you "suspend".
    2. Understand that there may be more paperwork problems when using borders crossings that are less frequented.

    I am still intrigued by the idea of selling and flying out, especially of a bike in the $3,500 value in USA, if it would sell within a month and at a high enough price to cover a trip out.
  4. krl

    krl semi noob

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    Looks like he crossed the border into Nicaragua yesterday around noon. According to his GPS it was only a 2 hour exercise which I believe is pretty normal so I am assuming that everything went smooth. He is currently in Jinotega, Nicaragua.
    Pepelopez has done a great job of putting this whole thing into perspective with his last few posts. I sincerely hope the information provided in these pages will assist another rider avoid this same dilemma. Again, thanks to all!

    https://share.delorme.com/leightonlindsay
  5. westnash

    westnash Long timer

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    Good luck to him on the return. Did he not have any luck in trying to sell the KLR in CR or just decide to move on as quickly as possible?
  6. krl

    krl semi noob

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    He did post his bike for sale on CL and a couple of local SJ sites, had a few people look at it but did not receive any offers. I think he posted it for 7k or7.5K on CL for two weeks and then dropped it to 6.5K last weekend.
  7. pepelopez

    pepelopez Been here awhile

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    If he would have posted it after he had the tico plates, good chance to sell it, but nobody wants to pay that much and still have to pay for plates, i woun't buy a bike in limbo, i would pay $7500-$8500 for a 2013 with tico plates, :freaky
  8. jimmex

    jimmex Guero con moto Supporter

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    Enough.
  9. LightWeightRider

    LightWeightRider n00b

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    How did this pan out? Im in CR riding around right now. I bought a CR registered and plated bike here and am planning to ride some panama and Nicaragua this winter but stuff like this makes me nervous to cross borders.
  10. Reaver

    Reaver How Did I Get Here?

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    You're fine. But you do need a letter of approval to take your CR registered vehicle out of CR. It just means you have no outstanding tickets before you go. There are many Facebook groups for Gringos in CR, they will help you.
  11. pepelopez

    pepelopez Been here awhile

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    And don't cross at borders not setup for vehicles, you have CR plates, should not be a problem, let me know if you need something, there's a few of us here.
  12. krl

    krl semi noob

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    follow the advice that Pepelopez and Reaver gave you........they know far more than I about the local laws relating to motorbikes in CR.
  13. pepelopez

    pepelopez Been here awhile

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    More than happy to help in any way I can, :beer
  14. Chiriqui Charlie

    Chiriqui Charlie Been here awhile

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    First of all, I have the utmost respect for Pepelopez. However, MANY riders have crossed at Sixaola, including myself on the old wooden bridge. Now there is a new bridge, shouldn't be a problem.
  15. pepelopez

    pepelopez Been here awhile

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    yeah, you "Can" cross there, just make sure the paperwork is done, often here if you don't make sure it's all done right, they don't care, and will let you hang yourself later,,, to lazy to care,,, and it's not a normal crossing, so if you get the new guy, he don't know, lot's of variables here,, every day is different..
  16. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    Just catching up to this ordeal. Sorry for your hassle, but thanks for the education. I learned a lot of details about importing/exporting vehicles in CR. Hopefully I'll remember the details when I need them... :ricky


    I read a lot of people complain about the bureaucracy in CR (and CenAm in general). That's because you never had a run-in with US customs. Doesn't matter if it's not your fault (as was in this case). Do you think anybody in our bureaucracy would admit fault? Unless you can prove it, you are hosed. And unlike the Ticos, there is no way around it. Doesn't matter how much money you have. Ask Bill Gates... :deal

    Gustavo
  17. krl

    krl semi noob

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    Agree totally that customs people in most countries, Canada included, are given way more power and authority than is justifiable. Those are th wrong people to cross as they can inflict a substantial amount of pain, mostly financial an emotional.
  18. Reaver

    Reaver How Did I Get Here?

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    Having just arrived in CR from Canada this week, ONLY Mexico physically looked at my bike and it's VIN. Guate and CR were the only Countries that made me verify the paperwork and sign as such. Much of the paperwork is UP TO YOU.

    Two travelers I met rode through all of Mex without a TVIP. The problem is when you try to leave. They paid mucho dinero for forged documents and spent an entire day going a few hundred meters to Guate.

    Do your homework.
  19. krl

    krl semi noob

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    "DO YOUR HOMEWORK" well said. would have saved my son a lot of money, time and frustration!! Doing your homework is especially important when you have language barriers!! It is time consuming, boring work that needs to be done before you leave, but.......................
  20. whizzerwheel

    whizzerwheel Unimaginative Lab Rat Supporter

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    I know this may sound naive, and may have been stated here before ( I haven't read the entire thread) but...if I were you, and had the time...I would write a carefully crafted letter about the actual facts and eventual outcome of your sons situation to: The Canadian Embassy in Ottawa (get the name of the person in charge), Copy the Costa Rican Board of Tourism: Attention Mauricio Ventura Ministro de Turismo, , and Copy the Canadian Embassy in Costa Rica.

    Do a little research to find the names of the actual Canadian department heads and address the letters directly to them. Nothing will probably ever come of it but at least they will know somebody is watching.

    Or...you can just let it go.