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New 2 wheel drive rally bike from yamaha?

Discussion in 'Racing' started by jimjib, Dec 30, 2002.

  1. jimjib

    jimjib Long timer

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    The sandy and rocky tracks of the Moroccan desert proved an ideal testing ground for Yamaha's 2 wheel drive rally bike. French enduro rider David Frétigné won the rally and Jean- Claude Olivier, President of Yamaha Motor France scored second.


    Yamaha is just about to change the future fate of motorcycle rally machines. Just like the 4 wheel drive rally cars a few years ago, the WR 450F 2-Trac demonstrated it's winning potential. It may seem obvious, that an all wheel driven vehicle would be superior on slippery or sandy surface. Nevertheless the technical development regarding weight, compactness and reliability is a big challenge and Yamaha is the only manufacturer to apply the 2 wheel drive technology on it's off road rally machines!

    Jean-Claude Olivier recalls: "Riding the WR 450F 2-Trac you will be amazed by its ability to perform in such difficult conditions like deep soft sand (or mud). The bike still goes on when standard bikes are digging themselves holes to get stuck.

    You also will realize quickly, that the 2-Trac motorcycle has a much higher steering stability both in straight line as well as in corners. It feels a bit like carved skis, you can lean into corners and the rear part of the bike takes up the same track easily without sliding. It makes riding much more relaxed when you don't need to counter steer."

    Even advantage for "normal" motorcycles

    Jean-Claude Olivier adds:" I guess that the advantage of a two-wheel drive must be even bigger for beginners than for experts. Just lean into the curve and the rear part of the bike automatically takes up the same track. You get quickly used and riding becomes quite natural. The 2-Trac system makes braking safer and easier: the bike stays well in line during braking. The rider does not need to brake in curves, but can brake stronger and later before cornering.

    Control the power

    Since the rider does not need to counter steer and can avoid rear wheel slides, control of power becomes much easier. Unlike a conventional motorcycle where even an experienced rider will fight with a sliding tail end, the 2-Trac is much more controllable. All you need to do is lean into a curve, the bike will follow your command precisely and stays perfectly in the desired line. An exciting efficiency and directness!"

    http://www.2wf.com/articles/news/B8D30872-9C1A-4285-A4BD-E98917A39844.asp
    #1
  2. cRAsH

    cRAsH Banned

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    Bitchin!

    A front wheel roost!
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    #2
  3. * SHAG *

    * SHAG * Unstable

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    I think Yamaha has been working on this for quite awhile!

    Now , someone will have to ride around a supercross track on the front wheel:drums during intermission:clap
    #3
  4. Robert

    Robert KickAss Adventurer

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    That's some cool shit....would love to see it with something like the 660 motor:evil
    #4
  5. Rad

    Rad Done riding

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    :huh

    That is just way to cool......I want that bike
    #5
  6. boyscout

    boyscout sittin' down

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    Against my better judgement I just have to ask, How does the addition of front wheel drive affect the need of the rider to counter steer? If he is just talking about flat tracking it through a turn, I guess I could understand but seems that counter steering in a normal turn would be just as effective with 2WD.

    -BS
    #6
  7. R-dubb

    R-dubb Dubbious Adventurer

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    The physics of calibrating the front and rear wheel speeds must be incredible. Sort of like ABS in reverse. I wonder if it is possible to fathom a bike with both wheels under hydraulic power? If that were possible the rear wheel could telescope like the front.

    Amazing stuff!

    :dj
    R-dubb
    #7
  8. ImaPoser

    ImaPoser adventure imposter

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    I wondered what yammy ever did with that. I remember seeing the article about that stup on an R-1. I didn't see any negatives about it then...
    #8
  9. jocflier

    jocflier Dammit, that hurt... Supporter

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    Sweeeettttt..count me in..:thumb

    Joc
    #9
  10. jimjib

    jimjib Long timer

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    That drisdale guy with the v8 sportsbike was playing with the same concept on a xr 600. If i remember correctly only 10% of the power is transferred to the front wheel. The mag guy that test rode the bike said you have awesome control with that front wheel pulling the bike through the corners.
    #10
  11. jimjib

    jimjib Long timer

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    [​IMG]

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    To backtrack a little, Sam Xereb lives in Traralgon, (a few hundred kilometres East of Melbourne Australia) and in 1993 he built a 2WD bike based on a Honda CR500 motocrosser. Much of the original bike remained but the front end was replaced with a 'stay-arm' and single upper pivoting triple clamp (not
    unlike the Saxon/Motodd Laverdas and later BMW Telelever) which allowed the implementation of a two-chain drive to the front wheel. Front and rear wheels were the same diameter with the front undergeared by 5% compared to the rear and driven through a one-way clutch allowing the front wheel to freewheel when coasting but lock up under power- much like a pushbike. Back to the story ..

    Sam's 2WD is a different story altogether- it is without a doubt the wildest thing I have ever ridden. This is accentuated by the fact that it is a 500 cc 2 stroke with no flywheel (removed when the crank was shortened to allow the drive to be tucked in closer) making the power delivery instantaneous. I rode it on a
    bush track with an embankment on one side and drop off on the other -not ideal on a dirtbike with 25 degrees of steering lock!

    On the first ride I didn't like it at all- the front (18in) knobby was a fairly wide pattern and you could feel the bumps as it stepped from one knob to the next- I was just being too cautious. I took a second ride- this time with a little more aggression- and became a convert. As the rear starts to break traction you can feel
    the back end come out and you opposite lock as per usual (whilst worrying about the limits of the lock). With a little more wheelspin the front starts to drive (5 % undergeared remember) and all of a sudden the handlebars come back to the straight ahead position and you are doing a perfect 2 wheel slide with the bars
    straight ahead. Amazing! Opposite locking into a slide is a natural (and fun) reaction on a conventional bike, it is hard to believe but
    2 wheel sliding with no lock is also a completely natural feeling. To look at someone else doing it looks just like the 4WD rally cars- perfect slides with no lock. Angles of lean can be much greater when cornering in the dirt as you can pull the bike down faster with the front driving- and also pull the bike out of the turn as well.

    Whilst most people can see the advantages of 2WD in the dirt- I also believe that it would have a marked effect on a roadrace bike's handling as well. Before we took the CR 500 out to the bush tracks Sam warmed it up in the street outside his house- I have never seen a bike come around a corner like that on
    bitumen in my life! Some minor advantage may be gained in a straight line but it is in corners that I believe 2WD roadracers would shine- imagine the confidence that would be gained from knowing that the back end can not slide out far enough to cause a highside. I could see that a return to harder compound tyres
    may even be desirable to encourage wheelslip to engage the 2WD instead of just using it as a 'backup'. Of course you can still 'lowside' a 2WD bike but I think there would be much more warning than either a lowside or a highside on a conventional roadbike.



    #11
  12. jimjib

    jimjib Long timer

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  13. jimjib

    jimjib Long timer

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  14. jimjib

    jimjib Long timer

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  15. Nitro Circus

    Nitro Circus Adventurer

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    So what ever happened to this thing now?!?
    #15
  16. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Bike was faster overall without it ?

    Pete
    #16
  17. DC950

    DC950 Microadventurer

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    OK, this has to be the Thread Resurection Record. 8 years!
    #17
  18. Motorfiets

    Motorfiets Long timer

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    I'm agreeing with you!! how the hell do people find these threads? :huh
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  19. header

    header Chris

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    :ear
    #19
  20. DC950

    DC950 Microadventurer

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    a long time ago when I used to watch The Simpsons, there was an episode where Marge sent a letter to Ringo Starr when she was a girl. 30 years later she got an answer. It had taken Ringo that long to get through all of his fan mail.

    The only thing I can guess he's been reading every post to every thread made since Advrider began and he's just now gotten to 2002:dunno.
    #20