"New" 2005 Dakar

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by KneeDrachen, Feb 12, 2008.

  1. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen Long timer

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    Just picked up a "new" to me bike, a 2005 Dakar. Heated grips, ABS, 4 way flashers, aux. power socket, lite buddies front and rear,touratech license plate support bracket, wilbers fork springs, new water pump, new chain and sprockets.
    I'm returning to riding after a 2 year hiatus due to 3 shoulder surgeries from a work injury, so I'm excited to be back on the road. Haven't gone for a ride yet, have to do the DMV (sucks) paperwork shuffle.
    I do have have a few questions for you all though, since I guess most of you on thumpers ride bikes with tubed tires. On my previous bikes (all tubeless tires) all I carried was a plug kit and my cycle pump. What tools do I need for a tube tire repair? I figure 2 tire irons (3, maybe?), a wrench/socket for the rear axle and chain adjusters, spare tube, and????
    Also, does it pay to patch a tube or just replace the tube? Any suggestions on a tube repair kit?
    Finally, any suggestions for "must-have" accessories to improve the bike for day-to-day living? I figured a centerstand from touratech for chain maintenance, but besides that, I don't know of anything else that screams it needs attention. I haven't posted over a f650.com yet, but will do so.
    Any help would be appreciated,
    Alex
    #1
  2. Nico

    Nico The Garg

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    Don't forget some way to re-inflate the tire, of course. Maybe a small electric pump or the CO2 cartridges many carry.

    You should probably study Neduro's thread about the process... http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

    I am one who subscribes to the thought that practicing this procedure in the comfort of your garage will pay dividend when you actually have to repair a flat in the field.

    Good luck. Glad you are back to riding.
    #2
  3. Max Kool

    Max Kool Xtankteam™

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    When I get a flat, I just replace it with a spare tire, and I patch the flat one later in the afternoon or in the evening. So I won't run the risk of a patch that hasn't completely dried yet and will fail while inflating it again.

    (and sometime you run into things that just can't be patched)
    #3
  4. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen Long timer

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    I apologize for not clarifying, I invested in a cyclepump. It was pricey, but I figured from what I read that you get what you pay for, plus I don't have to worry about running out of CO2 cartridges.
    I agree with practicing before an event is necessary, I'll take a look at that link. I always build tool kits for a bike that I own to make sure I have the right sockets, wrenches, etc. The whole tubed tire thing is a whole new entity for me.
    I'm glad to be back in the world of 2 wheels, now just have to sit through the DMV (sucks) paperwork shuffle.
    #4
  5. richc

    richc Long timer

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    I'd replace the tube if you get a flat. Walmart sells a pump for under $10 that works good. Centerstand is a good idea on that bike, the TT fork guards are good too, a dried bug on the forks and you can blow a seal. Do you have the F650 DVD's? If not and you need them, drop me a PM and I'll tell you where to send three blanks. Joining the Chain Gang is the next thing I'd recommend.
    #5
  6. toolfan

    toolfan Broken Hearted

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    You are doing it wrong.

    Use tapered glue on patches (tip-top is my brand of choice). Roughen your hole :evil , then apply a thin layer of glue. Wait for the glue to dry (or pretty much dry, about 3-5 minutes). Put the patch on.
    The tire is ready for use.


    I usually patch, but I carry one spare tube, in case I get one of those rare holes that can't be patched. Since I learned that you have to let the glue dry, I've never had a tapered patch fail.
    Also - be aware that slime and similar products will inhibit your ability to patch.
    #6
  7. Max Kool

    Max Kool Xtankteam™

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    Thank you for pointing that out, I knew it all the time secretly. :rofl

    Serious, I used to run a bicycle repair shop, I know how to fix a flat. I just hate doing it on the roadside, in the rain on a muddy slimy tire and I don't like to take the time to let the glue dry.

    This is all better done back in base camp with a beer and my feet on a table.

    (and fwiw, I've never had a flat in 10 years, it seems I carry my spare tires with me for my buddies)
    #7
  8. KneeDrachen

    KneeDrachen Long timer

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    I'm sure I can do a search but since you guys are mentioning it, I'm confused. You let the glue DRY and THEN put the patch on???? Shouldn't the glue be wet so the patch attaches to it and then it dries altogether forming a bond between patch and tube?
    Forgive my ignorance/stupidity, but I'm a total n00b at tubes, I've only had one flat on a mountain bike and it was a 5 minute (okay, I lied, 15 minute) process to replace the tube. Then again, on a mountain bike everything is quick release hardware. . .
    #8
  9. lvdukerider

    lvdukerider Las Vegas Nevada

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    Yes, you let the glue dry then put the patch on. I dont think a patch will even stick to wet glue.
    #9