New 2018 750/850GS merged threadfest

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by GS-A-Day, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. OzRider64

    OzRider64 Friggen slow Adventurer.

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    Do you think orange is better.
    I have had two, 02 640 Supermoto and a 05 640 Adventure.
    More reliable their not.
    #81
  2. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    So KTM haven't improved their reliability in the past 12 years?
    #82
  3. OzRider64

    OzRider64 Friggen slow Adventurer.

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    Ask people what they think of their 1190's filter sealing properties.
    And yes their quality probably has improved.
    But ask yourself, would you ride a KTM on a daily basis.
    As I've never owned a car in my life, started in 82. I'm not going to take the chance again.
    #83
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  4. arjones

    arjones Roads and Waves

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    I hope there's someone from BMW lurking around here...

    I'm gonna take the chance and put myself on the line here, with some questions and thoughts:

    1- is there any difference between riding trails (like single tracks) and riding gravel roads, sand pits and roads like what we can find around Patagonia and Los Andes (mostly on Ruta 40) - they call it "rípio"? Does riding the "Paso Sico" qualify as a proper off road ride?

    2- When we talk about riding enduro bikes, are we talking about riding Dakar routes and racing contexts? So, do I need a Dakar's bike to go to some of the Dakar routes?

    Well, here are my thoughts... if riding single tracks is the primary goal, every time you take the bike out, maybe the F 800/850/900/whatever GS (or the big orange ones for that meter) isn't the right tool. If we are talking about trashing the bike around big jumps and such... maybe it isn't neither. But I can see this bike doing things like that WHEN it's necessary. And when you put yourself and the bike out there, travelling and seeing the world, chances are you will have to deal with single tracks and extremely bumping roads. And guess what? This bike is extremely capable to get you out of these situations. There are a lot of RR's here that prove this statement. I have been in a lot of places around my country and S.A. and some of them got me really impressed on how the bike behave. Was I going against the clock? 160 km/h off tarmac? Definitely not. No way. Too remote at times and too dangerous. And I went to some of the Dakar routes. Didn't ride like the Dakar's heroes, but got there and came back, no problem. No busted rim, no nothing. Maybe I'm a pussy... maybe too careful, maybe it's only a meter of riding style, who knows. But I think your riding style is a big element when you choose which bike you will buy. Here in my country I always crack a laughter when people brag themselves about how fast they go with their big GS... Why don't they ride those Jaspion's bikes? Doesn't meter... they go really fast, but never too far away from the next café. To each his own.

    My point is the parallel twin from BMW is a very capable bike for what it is intended to do. And more, if you have the money for farkles and balls to go out there, outside your comfort zone. It has lots of things to improve and problems to solve, everything does.

    But please, BMW, do not take the fucking gas tank from its current place.

    Cheers.
    #84
  5. wipe-out

    wipe-out Been here awhile

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    That ship has sailed I'm afraid (judging by the pictures)...



    Gesendet von meinem ALE-L23 mit Tapatalk
    #85
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  6. Siricco

    Siricco Been here awhile

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    I can completely relate with your sentiments. I think most people on a longer journey will treat their ride with respect. What good is a broken bike, if it is their means of travel? People relying on their bike to work typically evaluate risks in that context.

    Regarding the location of the fuel tank, I think lets wait and see. To me its more about the total package (and its capabilities) and less about a particular design decision. Its all a compromise anyway ;).
    #86
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  7. hellyhans

    hellyhans Been here awhile

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    All they needed to do was integrate the 800gsa tank with the new frame.. if they have the tank under the seat with the capacity of the GSA. We have a winner in that aspect. But if they moved it up front..I think it's a bummer

    Sent from my T08 using Tapatalk
    #87
  8. Merlin32

    Merlin32 Been here awhile

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    Idk about you guys but I get some understeer with a full tank on my GSA so perhaps it's a more center bias weight even tho it's holding fuel "up front" ?
    #88
  9. wipe-out

    wipe-out Been here awhile

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    It is what it is, and as Siricco said, it is all a compromise. Personally I never liked the look of the bloated GSA rear. But I am going to miss that filler location when I will at some point get a different bike.

    Having said that, I'm really looking forward to see what KTM will bring with the 790...
    #89
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  10. Merlin32

    Merlin32 Been here awhile

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    Wait ! That bike doesn't exist BRO!
    #90
  11. wipe-out

    wipe-out Been here awhile

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    The 790 you mean? Well yeah, I know. The engine does exist however and here's to hoping!

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    #91
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  12. hellyhans

    hellyhans Been here awhile

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    Is your sag set properly? Maybe not enough preload

    Sent from my T08 using Tapatalk
    #92
  13. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    There is a discussion " F800GS front end light" with various viewpoints on whether the light front end can be dialled out with different suspension/ settings/ 18 inch wheels sizes.

    The advantage of having the fuel under the seat is obvious with respect to C of G and better air box access under the false tank. The downside is that to carry enough fuel for a long ride the weight is being carried too far back when the tank is full and luggage is being carried at the rear. It makes for a light front end. If under seat fuel tank position was without compromise , all manufacturers would be doing it.

    Having fuel in the conventional position ( between the wheels) puts more weight on the front wheel, but to some extent that it counter balanced by luggage weight at the rear. Packing your load to gain fore-aft balance is a matter of trial and error. Refuelling with a standard positioned tank with a tank bag fitted isn't much of a problem with quick release tank bags ( SW Motech type of ring lock)
    #93
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  14. BygDaddee

    BygDaddee Where do I get a pie

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    No thanks, I don't need that big bulk, some might like it, 16 or 17litres is perfect for me on such a fuel efficient bike, its easy to carry a bit more if you need it.

    Moving the tank up the front may not be as bad as some think, I personally love the under seat tank right where it is and would prefer it to stay there, and keep the air filter in the great place its in and so easy to get too, but it can be moved up if it's done right.

    If they do it like the Tiger with an already tall motor and the a tall tank on top it doesn't work well, but if they can design a patially sitting in frame tank it can be ok, and it helps to not only keep the weight lower in COG but also can bring the weight back a little towards the seat.

    example, I know its an endure bike but it just depends on frame and engine design on how well this could be done.

    IMG_4154.JPG
    #94
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  15. XRman

    XRman Long timer

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    Yes like the Husaberg design BD. Perimeter frame design will allow some volume amidships for fuel but for adequate fuel the tank wing pod design is needed. They can get a bit wide though ( e.g. Safari tank)
    #95
  16. Merlin32

    Merlin32 Been here awhile

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    I was being sarcastic I was lambasted for suggesting this earlier ...
    #96
  17. HK416

    HK416 Adventurer

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    So we have 24 hours to go for the above launch.
    #97
  18. Merlin32

    Merlin32 Been here awhile

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    Is this a strong possibility? Or will they unveil a new hybrid scooter?
    #98
  19. wipe-out

    wipe-out Been here awhile

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    Missed that :)
    #99
  20. arjones

    arjones Roads and Waves

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    To carry a little bit more of fuel isn't a problem at all when you need it. Took 8 liters more with me in a recent trip, 3 on a fuel canister attached to my right pannier, and 5 more on the rear rack. During a ride crossing the Sico Pass (linking Argentina and Chile) the bike managed something around 500 km... awesome. I think the altitude and the pace on a rough type of terrain contributed to the result. Of course, there is the hassle (not that big of a deal) of taking the canister, refueling the bike, etc...

    As for the tank bag on a regular positioned fuel tank, some times it can be very annoying when you try to do your pit stop on a gas station something more low profile and fast. And after some time you get really tired of it.

    I always try to see the down sides and benefits of a bike, based on the reality of an overland trip. Because this is what I guess is the real definition of an adventure riding: go far, no matter what type of terrain, and come back safe and sound.
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