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New Airhead Project

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by guywithchickens, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. WRC51

    WRC51 Long timer

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    1,528
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    Santa Rosa, Calif.
    As a total airhead noob, why is there only 4 Cylinder base O-rings? Looking at your photos I see that only the top head studs have the O-rings, why is this ? Thanks
  2. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Illinois, USA
    ^^^ Only the top studs have adjacent oil passages.
  3. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    Nov 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    there are three o-rings per cylinder...two small for the top head stud and the large cylinder base o-ring.
  4. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    907
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    Central CT
    Spent some time today taking off handlebars, instrument panel, and wiring. Forks are next. Getting close to "total disassembly". I'll get the frame prepped and off for powdercoat, then let the rebuilding begin! I think the first big step will be identifying and sourcing all the parts. Assuming this is like any other project in my life, disassembly is the easy part...

    Side note: The build table is one of the smartest things I've ever done. Less than $100 and a couple of hours effort. It puts the bike at an easy height, is 8' long to add some workspace, and has storage underneath. Makes a HUGE difference in ease of working. Downside is that I need a buddy to help roll the bike onto (and eventually off) via a ramp. Another thing I appreciate as I get older is good light. I have several flourescents, but just added a 4' LED shop light from the Depot. Very impressed. I'm lucky that my basement connects to my garage with just one step, so I can get bikes into the basement for the winter. Heat, good light, safe place to keep in-process projects away from kids/pets/etc.

    IMG_1376.JPG
    First time I've ever removed an entire wiring harness. Easy to remove, but I foresee a PITA to reinstall. I took LOTS of pictures before I removed it. Any tips on cleaning a wiring harness?
    IMG_1375.JPG

    Also, thanks to Beemerguru for the tip to add location to my info!
  5. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    A rag or paper towel with a spritz of WD40 makes a good first cut on the harness casing. It dries pretty clean (no residue). Take some time and inspect/clean all the terminal blocks.
  6. brittrunyon

    brittrunyon 1992 R 100 GS

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,007
    Location:
    High Desert of New Mexico
    I just ordered...........

    41GI8hH77cL._AC_US436_QL65_.jpg

    .......to help clean up the corrosion on the connectors of my /6 project.
    Worth a try.
    On the casing I will be using 303 plastic/rubber conditioner.
    As you now know, a lift is a life/back saver.
    Keep up the good work!
    BR
    tac650 likes this.
  7. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    The Deoxit is good stuff. I found it helpful to use a folded over pipe cleaner (politically correct name these days is fuzzy sticks -- look in the craft section at Walmart). Spray the pipe cleaner with Deoxit and use it to clean inside the female spade connectors. While you're at it, squeeze the connector gently with a pair of pliers. For the male spade connectors, a small brass brush in a Dremel tool works well when used gently. It's worth the time to pull back the insulator on each connector to do all this. Yours may not be as nasty as some of mine were, but they could be:

    [​IMG]

    Opinions are divided on the use of dielectric grease. You may want to google that and decide for yourself.

    I like the beaded board door in your basement workshop. I've had a few like that myself. :-)
    tac650 likes this.
  8. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    +2 on WD40.....you'll be using a lot of zip ties when rewiring...I spend a lot of time checking the wiring for strains and possible areas for rubbing through the insulation. Double check the wires in the terminal blocks, make sure they are tight and look for possible breaks. Clean ends and use dielectric grease.
  9. kevin g

    kevin g Been here awhile

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    San Diego
    How exactly will you "get the frame prepped and off for powdercoat"? I mean, what prep will you be doing? My RS will be to that stage of the project in a week or so. Are you going to strip the frame or have the powder coater do it?
  10. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    No idea yet. This is my first time. I'm going to call a couple vendors tomorrow and do some internet research.
  11. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    All the bits that I believe are candidates for powder coat are fully disassembled.

    IMG_1394.JPG

    Question: Of the bits below, which should I powder coat?

    IMG_1395 (1).JPG

    (Honestly, I'm a little embarrassed by the state of the workbench in the background. Rest assured, my main workbench is behind me as I take these photos and it is much tidier!)
  12. Uke

    Uke visualist Super Supporter

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    Isn't the Air Box plastic? Powder coating might cause it to melt.

    You can powder coat the exterior of the headlight bucket, but when push comes to shove, you'll really want to paint the inside white.
    UnclePete and beemeruss like this.
  13. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Nope. Feels like cast aluminum.

    Upon further reflection, I need to dig out a few other parts too (bracket that holds headlight/turn signals/instruments, etc.). Also, based on a little internet research, asking the "paint vs. powder coat" question is apparently very controversial. At least I didn't ask what the best oil is...
  14. lucky6600

    lucky6600 Long timer

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    Nice progressive!!

    If I were you, I will powder coat the frame, subframe, swingarm and rims.

    The reason is BMW didn't powder coat the bike. Everything was painted. The powder coat will increase the thickness which will cause few issues with fit and finish when you are putting stuff back together. For example if you powder coating the headlight bucket, you will find you can't get the headlight installed properly.

    Another thing about powder coating the frame is you will find yourself having grounding issue when you are wiring the harnesses.

    How deep are you planning on "rebuild " the engine?
    Jim K in PA likes this.
  15. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Location:
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    More disassembly than engine "rebuild". Bike only has 11,000 miles. Pistons/cylinders/heads/etc. all look great still. I'm going to replace rear main seal and oil pump seal. Might do front main seal. Most of the plan is cleanup/polish and replace seals/gaskets.

    Here's the engine state today. I'll remove the timing chain cover for paint and that's as deep as I plan to go.
    IMG_1338.JPG

    Aside: I removed the rotor this morning with the "special bolt". Took literally 20 seconds. I love using the right tool...
  16. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    Risking telling you what you already know, do be sure to block the crankshaft before you remove the flywheel.

    Also, before you remove the clutch, you should use a prick-punch or a paint stick or just some paint on a little brush to mark the clutch parts and their alignment with the flywheel. Rumor has it that the factory balanced all of this as a unit. I have my personal doubts about that, but it won't hurt anyway to put it back like it was.

    In any case, I think it is a good idea to mark the flywheel relative to the crankshaft. That makes certain that it doesn't get installed in the wrong position, which would place your timing marks wrong. Some say to simply align the timing marks before removing the flywheel, then put it back with the marks aligned. That's O.K., but a spot of paint removes all doubt.

    Here is a picture of my engine with the flywheel removed. Note the paint spot on the crankshaft:

    [​IMG]

    And another picture with the flywheel in place:

    [​IMG]
    guywithchickens and Uke like this.
  17. kevin g

    kevin g Been here awhile

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    How much do you think the engine weighs? I am hoping to be to the point were I can remove my R100 engine while my sons are home for the holidays. I am planning on leaving the cylinders and heads in place, I think.

    As for frame finish, if one were to decide to paint instead of powder coat what type of paint? It seems like a good epoxy paint would be the toughest.
  18. Jim K in PA

    Jim K in PA Long timer Supporter

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    I honestly would only powdercoat the battery box, and perhaps the center stand. Unless you want a lot of work cleaning PC out of nooks and crannies and stripping it from the BMW emblem, I would not PC the starter or airbox covers.

    My PC guy is VERY cognizant of too much powder causing problems, and keeping powder off of areas that should not get it. Not all coaters are as diligent, so be careful.

    My son's R65 has the cast aluminum airbox cover too. He plans to strip the paint and leave it rough cast. Just another perspective.
    guywithchickens likes this.
  19. One Less Harley

    One Less Harley OH.THAT'S GONNA HURT

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    Bowling Green, Ky
    two people can lift the engine out of the frame, cylinders and heads make it awkward..but it's no to heavy. It's just turning it the right way to get it on and out.
  20. Pokie

    Pokie Just plain Pokie.

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    Fort Collins, CO
    I've lifted the complete engine in and out of the frame by myself BUT it does take some preparation and a little ingenuity.
    beemeruss and WooPig like this.