New Airhead Project

Discussion in 'Airheads' started by guywithchickens, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Mine is easy to pick up by myself with heads/cylinders/transmission/starter/alternator removed. Maybe 50lbs?
  2. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Looking at my parts today, I think I've come to the same conclusion. I'll just spray the timing cover, airbox, starter cover, and headlight. Way too much to mask or clean out if powder coated, especially on the timing cover. Each of these parts is pretty small and should be easy to spray.
  3. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    I recently stripped and powder coated my frame and several parts (including some of the ones you ask about) on an '83 R80ST. I can see reasons not to powder coat the timing chain and starter covers - prime among them retaining the bare BMW logo & lines of both parts. As unorthodox as it is, I opted to have all of them covered to minimize the start of future wear. That said, I'm living with it for now and might decide to go a different route later. If you want to see what it looks like fully powder coated, look at my posts & pics on prepping the frame and other parts for powdercoating, see posts 15-27 on the powdercoating, stripping, painting discussions.

    http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...0st-the-journey-of-a-nonpro-mechanic.1149424/

    Great work so far!
  4. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    I just posted my discussion of reinstalling the wiring, and can confirm that using a mild detergent and Deoxit D5 works well for cleaning up the harness. You'll also find the pictures you took are VERY helpful. My post also references a link to a useful color-coded wiring diagram from "Prospero's Garage" - the diagram for my bike, an R80ST, is the same one you would need for your R65... See post #98 in http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...0st-the-journey-of-a-nonpro-mechanic.1149424/ .
    guywithchickens likes this.
  5. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Actually, I had read through your thread a few weeks ago. Good stuff there. Your post on wiring install should be very helpful!
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  6. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Dropped off the frame, subframe, battery box, center stand, and headlight bracket at powder coater today. Should be about two weeks. Now to start cleaning the engine cases and ordering parts...
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  7. Beemerguru

    Beemerguru Beemerguru...G/S guy

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    Do you know if the bike ever went down hard or hit something? Might be worth it to have a local BMW shop put it on the jig to check for frame alignment.

    That aluminum air box cover is sorta rare...most were plastic. For cafe builds, I have it polished...nice effect but not on a G/S.

    The main harness is actually a pretty easy install...also right time to add an LED tail light unit for safety.

    A competent powder coating shop will plug all the holes so you don't have to tap or Dremel anything...and if done right, not that much different from the factory paint. I've done Gloss Black, Matte Black, Satin Black, White, Burgundy red, Dark Forest Green, Midnight blue. Only had to clean up the coating a couple times...mainly on the valve covers since you want a perfectly flat surface.

    Easiest way to get an engine in and out is take the top end off first. Then you just lean over the frame, grab the studs, lift up and tilt left and up...and out onto a stool right next to the bike. Same for installation. I always do the rods bearings out rebuilds with the short block in the frame.
  8. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    It was my Dad's bike. Fell over once while on the sidestand in a strong Wyoming wind while Dad was watching my football practice (6th grade?). Dented the tank, which he replaced.

    I put brightly colored zip ties through all the holes I wanted masked for powder coating. The guy said it shouldn't be an issue.

    Good tip on the LED tail light, thanks.
  9. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Ordered all the seals/gaskets/o-rings for the engine today. Took a couple hours of going through the fiche to get all the parts identified.

    Removed the clutch and flywheel. Much easier with guidance from the forums (extra thanks to FXRay and NoiZboy). Below are all the parts. Note that I marked TDC and I match-marked each part. Clutch looks to be in good shape.

    IMG_1401 (1).JPG

    Then I spent a couple hours cleaning up the engine. I used FXRay's method of WD-40 with a small brass brush in the Dremel. Works well. I'll likely Rub-n-Buff these too. Note the bondage-inspired blocking for the crank. Apparently I have lots of zip ties.

    IMG_1403.JPG IMG_1404.JPG IMG_1405.JPG
    popscycle, bike41, NoiZboy and 3 others like this.
  10. kevin g

    kevin g Been here awhile

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    Your cleaned up motor looks sweet. I will have my motor out of the frame tomorrow and start the cleaning process. I have not pulled the jugs off since the engine has only 13K miles on it but may do it just to get the engine clean. How are you going about cleaning up the fins on the cylinders and heads? I f I take these off and take the heads apart I can get them bead blasted.
  11. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Haven't crossed that bridge yet, but I'll follow fxray's lead (http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/my-barn-twins.1046332/page-39#post-33853704).

    My heads & cylinders are in reasonably good shape, so just need a little polishing.
  12. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Some days you make great progress and some you don't. Today was the latter. Two issues:

    1. Mufflers are stuck on header pipes. I've applied ATF/acetone, heat, cold (it's ~10F here), PB Blaster, more heat, mallet, strap wrench, etc. They won't budge. I'll keep applying penetrant and remain hopeful. Any tips?

    2. Valve cover gaskets are stuck on heads. I tried alcohol, acetone, lacquer thinner. No progress. They appear to be stuck on with some white sealant. Worst case, I'll have to mechanically scrape them, but I fear I'll hurt the surface. Ideas?
  13. cycleman2

    cycleman2 Long timer

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    Engine is easily managed with two sets of extra hands. You will want to take the transmission off first. I painted my frame and you can just use a 2 part black paint with a hardener. Easy to touch up if you have to in the future.
  14. aptbldr

    aptbldr easy rider

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    Likely temperature's part of problem with valve cover sealant.
    Low temps are hard on a fellow's approach to stubborn mechanical problem's, too.
  15. cycleman2

    cycleman2 Long timer

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    If you don't plan on doing some work with the head I would just leave it alone. Just use a spray like wd40 or some degreaser and a small brush to get between the fins. Bead blasting removes some metal along with the grit. Cast aluminium is soft. So I wouldn't bead blast them.
  16. fxray

    fxray Long timer

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    I always try to remember that "doing nothing at all" is usually one of the viable options to consider -- at least short term, anyway. The penetrant, mallet, and strap wrench used gently over a couple days may get the job done on the mufflers.

    I agree with what cycelman2 said about the head gaskets. Usually, I think the ideal situation is to have the old gasket stick to the valve cover. You generally never have to replace it and it never leaks. When somebody does replace the valve cover gasket, they often have problems. So, as mentioned, if you don't have to work on the heads, you could just let the gaskets stay in place. If you remove the old gaskets, I think I'd glue the new ones with some HondaBond4 to the valve covers only.

    You will probably be O.K. Judging by the work you have done already, I'd be willing to bet you can get those old gaskets off the heads with no damage. It is all looking good from here. :-)
  17. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Solution to #2: Heat! Used the torch (gently) and the adhesive starts to let go and it's easy to scrape/pull the gasket off.

    #1 is still going through heat/penetrant cycles...
  18. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    I totally agree! I've found that cold, bad light, poor ergonomics all contribute to more frustration. That's why I put some effort into the workspace.

    Luckily, I work in my basement. It's not directly heated, but it does contain the furnace, so it's mid-50's. Not bad compared to yesterday's -5F windchill outside. It also has good light and good work surfaces. My Harbor Freight rolling stool is one of the best purchases I've ever made!
  19. Renner

    Renner combustophile Supporter

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    Mine took some effort, came free yesterday
    http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...under-the-wrench.1271595/page-3#post-33988571
    I used a 1-1/2 spade drill for wood to make half-rounds, used those as drifts to avoid damaging the pipes.
    Problem was: when applying force at the pipe's bend it cocks the pipe in the exhaust spigot's bore.
    The solution was to lift the tail of the pipe (white strap around the crosspipe in the first image linked above) to maintain alignment of the pipe within the bore.

    hope this helps
    enjoying your thread :lurk
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  20. guywithchickens

    guywithchickens Been here awhile Supporter

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    Fin polishing time. Before/after below. Weapons of choice in the bottom pic: WD-40, Scotch-brite, a couple sticks and paper towel..

    IMG_1411.JPG

    IMG_1412.JPG

    Note in the background my "big white tub". This is a re-purposed washing machine drain pan. I bought it for some other project years ago, but I now use it as a cleaning station. It's easy to put on the bench or ground and I can make all sorts of mess that stays nicely contained. It's big, but short enough to fit between the front & rear wheels of most bikes. I've even used it under my V-strom when I needed to do some serious front-sprocket-area de-greasing.