New Long-Range Energica Eva Ribelle Electrifies Streetfighter Game

Discussion in 'Electric Motorcycles' started by jas67, Nov 8, 2019.

  1. jas67

    jas67 Long timer

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  2. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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  3. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    Go to the Energica website (energicamotorusa.com) and look at the seats on the EsseEsse9, and even the Ego, in pure side views. Both relatively flat. Now look at the slope of the seat on the Ribelle. Guaranteed to get your goodies gouged on the back end of the tank, and prevents any shifting about for comfort.

    If you like the Ribelle, think hard about a different seat. An EsseEsse9 seat will likely fit, but requires some matching bodywork pieces. An expensive fix no matter how you go about it. What were they thinking?
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  4. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    By all reports the Energica Eva variants are fine motorcycles under most conditions. I have pointed out that they are extremely heavy (a fully-gassed ZX14 is almost 30 lbs. lighter), so much so that Energica is embarrassed to include the curb weight figures on their website. (What other manufacturer leaves out weight in their specs?) It's probably not an issue if you typically ride no more vigorously than 6 or 7 tenths. But sometimes you need everything your bike has. I haven't seen any reports of how Energicas perform under duress until now. This is from https://www.motorcycle.com/manufacturer/energica/2018-energica-eva-esse-esse-9-review.html :

    *************
    About the weight
    While the motor’s output did a good job of masking the Esse Esse 9’s 621-pound curb weight, the bike’s heft was clearly noticeable in both the braking and handling departments.

    [​IMG]
    Premium components abound – from the Marzocchi fork to the OZ Racing wheels. The giant 330mm Brembo discs are necessary to haul the bike’s heft down from speed.

    Like all Energicas, the Esse Esse 9 has a pair of 330mm discs squeezed by radial-mounted, four-piston Brembo M432 calipers. Although Troy and I chose different kinds of roads for our performance testing (I hit the swoopy Angeles Crest Highway and Troy rode in a tighter, twistier, point-and-shoot environment), we came to similar conclusions. First, the big discs and premium calipers were a must because of the mass that needed to be slowed. Second, the Esse Esse 9 tended to stand up under trail braking and preferred that corner speed be set early so that the throttle could be applied.

    ”The twin 330mm discs and Brembo calipers work especially hard to slow the motorcycle. Now I know that 621lbs is what it takes to make 330mm discs and Brembo calipers feel average in stopping power. What I found weird was that the SS9 feels like its weight is slightly biased towards the rear, so I was quite heavy on both front and rear brakes trying to slow her down.” Notes Troy, ”Since the bike tends to stand up when trail braking, I would drag the rear brake through a turn if I really had to shed some speed.”

    [​IMG]
    Look closely at the Bitubo shock, and you’ll see that the rebound damping is turned all the way to slow. Still, it couldn’t prevent boinginess after the suspension was fully compressed over a G-out bump.

    In most situations, the suspension was able to handle the bike’s weight. On single bumps – or even stutter bumps – the suspenders did a good job of keeping the chassis from becoming unsettled. However, hit a G-out compression-type bump at speed, and the Bitubo shock’s rebound circuit simply wasn’t able to handle the recoil from a fully compressed rear suspension. This was even with the rebound set to full slow. The Marzocchi 43mm inverted fork was better able to handle this kind of bump, which we attribute to the rearward weight bias of the bike.
    ***************

    We're still not there in terms of doing everything really right as well as some ICE motorcycles can. There isn't an example of EM sweet perfection like the Street Triple or a few others are for ICE bikes. I will be forever grateful to Energica, Zero, Brammo, even Lightning (if they ever get their act together) for putting EMs on the map, but it still looks like it's going to take Yamaha, Triumph, Kawasaki or some other major player to make the real magic happen. And when that happens, all those brave souls who blazed the trail for others to follow might very well be left in the dust.

    It's not fair, and it doesn't have to be this way. Somewhere out there is someone who can get this right. It looked like Lightning might be the one with the Strike, but now they have years ahead of them before anyone can fully trust them. This is doable. Someone please do it.
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  5. Bluesmudge

    Bluesmudge Been here awhile

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    The true 100 miles of highway range on these 2020 Energica bikes seems like a game changer to me. I'm seriously considering the 21.5 kWh Eva EssEssSE9+ (terrible name btw). If you commute daily the bike pays for itself in 3-6 years vs ICE commute bikes like a Honda NC750X.
    The $3,000 OHLINS upgrade is supposed to solve the suspension issues if you plan to really push the bike hard. Even with all the factory options this bike is cheaper than the HD Livewire and has all the best features of the Livewire (Level 3 charging) and the Zero SR/F (Level 2 charging and performance) plus a good deal more range than either bike.
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  6. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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    Bluesmudge, I currently have the Eva 107 and I am planning on trading it in for Eva Ribelle with the 21.5 kWh battery. The longer range and having traction control will be awesome. Will let you know real world range shortly after I get mine in, sometime late February. They have also increased the torque although hard to say if it is obvious once you get on it. It is often overlooked when we get into these discussions about electric vs ICE for commuting but no one has ever designed a gas engine that can deliver torque like an electric motor can and for me that is the real appeal of an electric motorcycle. I also have a KTM 1290 SA which is a real beast and the Eva will smoke the KTM. I am at the point where if range and or charging times are no issue I ride the Eva, if they are I ride the KTM. Both are awesome motorcycles.
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  7. Bluesmudge

    Bluesmudge Been here awhile

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    I'll be very interested to hear your thoughts. Especially real world range at 60 - 70 mph in colder february weather. If it's still 100 miles then I'm totally sold.
    Do you know if the range is actually the same between all three models? I would think the different fairings and ergonomics would effect range at highway speeds but Energica lists the range as the same for all three + models.

    I was also wondering when these models would actually hit dealerships. Sounds like february - march? Or do you have to pre-order the bike without sitting on it or riding it?
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  8. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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    Bluesmudge, The first models that are available are going to previous owners that are upgrading so I am thinking models for others may be March/April. I doubt the range is exactly the same on all three models just due to different riding positions. I am on NC so temps in Feb may not be extremely cold.
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  9. 666

    666 Agnostic and Orange

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    I am getting a test ride next week. They dont have 2020 lineup yet, so it will be 2019 ss9. New bikes should be here in April. Then I try them too. I have a dealer 10 minutes away from my work.
    I am not planning to buy at this prices, but curious enough to try it.
    Seems like a heavy bike.
    I would disagree about paying for itself in 4-5 years, because I usually get slightly used and/or heavily discounted bike for 7-12k and it last for about 60k miles before I sell it. With insurance about 75$ per year and at 4$ per gallon, 45 mpg - 5400 on gas, about 1k on oil changes. I do all service myself.
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  10. Dave.0

    Dave.0 on the spectrum

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    I like this bike. I have had Tuono lust for a long time, but this could cure it. Still heavy and expensive but seems to be getting closer to the tipping point. I almost bought a Zero years ago but just couldn't pull the trigger but I enjoyed the instant torque and twist and go character of the electric bike.
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  11. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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    I am not sure about how close we are to the tipping point but I do think we are at a point where there is competition between Zero and Energica. Not an easy decision for those looking at the SR/F and the Eva Ribelle. The competition should speed innovation and benefit all of us.
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  12. Bluesmudge

    Bluesmudge Been here awhile

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    Seems like the DC fast charge makes it a no brainier between the SR/F and the Energica bikes. With the Zero you have to keep another motorcycle in the garage for long trips. With proper route planning, the 2020 Energicas could be a complete replacement for a ICE bike.
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  13. Crilly

    Crilly Long timer Super Supporter

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    If the damn DC charger works.
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  14. full of days

    full of days Simplify or Die

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    Lightnings new 11k model will likely be what ushers me to the electric side.
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  15. ctromley

    ctromley Long timer

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    Good point. At least with an Energica you also have Level 2 charging, which is generally available at the same location as the Level 3 charger. If you're low on charge on a Livewire, you roll up to a Level 3 charger and it's out of service, you are seriously hosed. Plan on camping out awhile. Even just getting enough charge to get you to the next Level 3 charger can be an exercise in patience if you can only charge at Level 1 rates.
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  16. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    OK, why do DC chargers quit?

    Is it a computer problem? Circuit breaker problem? Melt down problems? Operator errors?
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  17. Crilly

    Crilly Long timer Super Supporter

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    I think it is the internet problem.
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  18. Cataract2

    Cataract2 Where to?

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    Teething pains. Problems and concentration of chargers seems to be overall improving.
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  19. ultrarnr

    ultrarnr Been here awhile

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    A few weeks ago I had to get a state inspection done on my Eva 107 and have to charge once enroute to my dealer. I decided to try an Electrify America CCS charger. After trying three of them and one long call to customer service I could not get a charge going and was worried there was something wrong with my bike. I ended up charging on L2 so I could make it to a EVgo CCS charger a few miles away where I charged with no problem. On the way home I stopped by a ChargePoint CCS charger and had no problems. All I can figure out is the EA station and my Eva couldn't get the proper handshake to begin charging. No problems with the other stations. I was lucky this time as there were other charging options but many times there aren't. The EA stations are still very much in the middle of "growing pains" and have a long way to go before they are reliable. If you look on Plugshare four wheeled EVs have their share of problems with EA so my problems should not be viewed as motorcycle only.
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  20. 666

    666 Agnostic and Orange

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    I rode 2019 model, I think ss9. I had about 16 miles total, some highway, some twisty backroad. I did like it. It feels like real motorcycle, goes fast, smooth, very quiet, suspension not bad at all. Forks were actually fine, shock was bouncy on big bumps. But I had no chance to adjust it. I went above 100 few times and it felt fine. The weight - it seems fine as well, even right after my tiger 800.
    Build quality is great. I will go back to test ride 2020 bikes.
    I wouldnt say that it had crazy fast acceleration, but above 40-50 it was definitely faster than tiger 800(with pipe and correct fueling). I had it in sport mode.
    I wanted to use clutch at slow speed for tight turns.
    Brakes were more than adequate.

    Attached Files:

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