New Rider - Need Bike Guidance/Suggestions/Heckling

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Weeirish, May 15, 2018.

  1. Weeirish

    Weeirish Adventurer

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    Hello!

    As this constitutes as my first forum post Id like to say hello to everyone!

    So, I just finished my BRC this last weekend and for the past month I've been trying to find a bike that suits me. Figure this would be the best place to ask about it, if not please let me know or move it.

    Lets get what I want to do out of the way.

    I ultimately need a bike that can do 70 MPH without issue and preferably comfortably-ish, but also tackle some forest service roads over here in Washington. Also, something where I wont hate myself driving to work in the morning on street occasionally... but for the most part it will be for weekend adventures for fishing/camping/hiking and fiddling around on some back roads.

    From I have absorbed from the internet, building a "scrambler" would be my best bet for a cheap-ish bike I dont have to worry about if I drop a few times. I have no issues building a bike or basing it off a older model bike. I just can't find a decent guidelines for what you need for minor offroading. Most builds are for road scramblers it appears. Of course I could just shell out the money and buy a Triumph or Ducati... but being a newer rider Id be too paranoid about it (Plus I believe they are somewhere in the territory of 800+CC). On the other hand, there are dual sports. They appear to be a bit overkill for what I am trying to achieve. I would just like some input from people who do minor off roading in terms of what bike or what to look for in a base bike, suspension, height, sit stance, motor, torque? etc.

    I am also 6'2 so this really narrows down bikes for me...(I took the BRC on a 250 rebel, my handle bars hit my knees).

    TL;DR: 6'2 guy from Washington seeks bike for 80% pavement and 20% forest service roads who is relatively new to motorcycles with a small budget for his first bike.
    #1
  2. CRW

    CRW I dont want a pickle

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    buy a dual sport learn to ride. They are very forgiving, mostly shitty on the hywy but who cares you are learning to ride. Once you kinda got it figured out buy another bike then build what you want. Never want to jeopardize you runner...... you want to build or ride??
    #2
  3. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    How small a budget ? It's gonna make a big difference.
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  4. Weeirish

    Weeirish Adventurer

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    I'd say depending on the bike but around 7000$ would be my budget.
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  5. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    You can get a lot of bike for that. DR650, KLR650 or any number of great used bikes. One of my riding buddies bought a new Honda NC700X with 50/50 tires that did great on one of our Colorado DS rides. I know a lot of folks poopoo the scooter frame and low rpm power but it's fuel injected and works great for hwy. Did a great job on CO jeep trails too.

    [​IMG]
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  6. Weeirish

    Weeirish Adventurer

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    Yeah that Honda NC700X looks about what I want. Might be a little bit too much bike for me to start out.
    I was also maybe looking at the Suzuki SV650 as well... Not sure if thats viable.
    I always hear people say you can take just about any bike on a service road with the right tires.. not sure how true that is.
    #6
  7. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    True enough. My best recommendation is get a small light dirt bike and learn to ride dirt. Maybe even trials. But if you really want to build something, how bout one of these... http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/honda-crf500l-owners.1219100/
    #7
  8. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    The guy on the NC700X is 6'2", 240lbs and 74yo and a good rider with a replaced hip and a pace maker. :clap
    #8
  9. DittyBag

    DittyBag A bag of dirty stuff

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    NC700(670cc) that makes a whooping 50 h.p. and weighs 450 lbs?
    Consider something better at everything (cept valve adjusts) that won't leave you wishing for more with that 80% highway duty. And it will do Cinnabon Pass, Imogene, Black Bear, Engineer, Mosquito and a bunch of other stuff. Crash tough.

    A 2008-2009 Hypermotard 1100 is within your budget. At Immogene-02095.jpg
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  10. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    1100 Hypermotard for a new rider ????
    #10
  11. Weeirish

    Weeirish Adventurer

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    Why I must say that is a beautiful bike, I also must agree a 1100 seems a bit big for starting out.
    I do appreciate the post though.

    While looking at Hondas as you posted I stumbled upon a 2013 CB500X with a rally raid kit for 6600$. It seem a bit much for a older bike but appears to be in good shape.
    https://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/mcy/d/rally-raid-stage-3-honda/6589128749.html

    Ultimately I wouldn't want to spend my whole budget on just a bike however. Still need some gear as well.
    #11
  12. DittyBag

    DittyBag A bag of dirty stuff

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    He's been riding a Rebel, so no problem.
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  13. DittyBag

    DittyBag A bag of dirty stuff

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    That's a pretty cool bike. Best wishes. If you find yourself on the other coast, you are welcome to try mine.
    #13
  14. Weeirish

    Weeirish Adventurer

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    Thanks!
    Maybe one day Ill make way over that way.
    Hopefully more experienced.
    #14
  15. draco_1967

    draco_1967 Spoon!

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    The NC700X is a great bike in a lot of ways. It is super easy to handle with the COG so low. The MPGs are awesome. It handles forest service roads and jeep trails just fine. The storage compartment up front is the best real-world usage feature on any bike I've had. It isn't blazing fast, but it can still be fun. I had no problem cruising at extra-legal speeds on the highway, but don't expect to pass anyone in a hurry if you are already at 75+ mph. I think it is a fantastic bike, new rider or not. Sometimes I wish I still had mine.

    Good luck with your search!
    #15
  16. 16VGTIDave

    16VGTIDave Reaver made me do it...

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    Kawasaki Versys 650. With the right tires it will do everything the OP wants, and then some. Cheap to run. Cheap to insure. Cheap and easy to maintain. The 650 twin is a well behaved engine that is fun when twisted. It is a re-tuned Ninja motor with a proven record. The Versys' suspension can handle city commuting to logging roads without drama.

    Used, low mileage bikes in good condition can be had inexpensively. Oh, and there are enough farkles available to make personalizing it a breeze.
    #16
  17. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Hate to keep pushing the NC700X (there are a lot of good/better bikes out there) but there were some new "14's at dealers for cheap. I think my buddy gave $4800.
    #17
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  18. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    Why aren't any folks suggesting a KLR? Sounds perfect for his needs and wants. (A DR if he was shorter, but at 6'2" he can fit a KLR easily.) Used ones well appointed are half his budget.
    #18
  19. Schmokel

    Schmokel In desperate need of a nap.

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    I'll go against the grain here.

    A used, $1200 250. I would not advise spending $7,000 for your first motorcycle.
    #19
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  20. aldend123

    aldend123 Long timer

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    A common debate topic around here is exactly what constitutes 'off road'. Some people think it means gnarly terrain, others think it includes maintained dirt roads. Keep this in mind when reading discussion.

    For occasional maintained dirt roads on a bike you primarily use for highway commuting, any bike will do. There are bikes that will be better for offroad, and tires that will be better for dirt roads, but you really don't want either if you're doing a lot of highway cruising.

    I wouldn't think twice about taking my Aprilia down a dirt road. But I will be going very slow in muddy sections because of the smooth front tire, and will get hesitant if there is water deeper than a few inches that spans the whole road due to ground clearance and a lack of knobbed tires.

    A dirt-oriented bike like a KLR will handle a drop or five much better than a fully faired bike. Either off-road, or in a parking lot when you fumble.
    I'm not sure I'd lean too strongly in the 250 direction, but we're in agreement on the low-budget. SV650 might be in the right ball park. Cheap, lots of info and spare parts, not the worst bike to drop, but still going to cruise.

    If it's really going to be 20% mileage on service roads, and they'll be of the lesser maintained variety, then maybe something more dirt oriented.
    #20
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