New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    No pliers in my kit! I'm telling the PO I want a refund...
  2. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    It's 92144A, the shim as you state. Or perhaps an aftermarket part with the same function. Good to know that you've had no issues leaving it out.

  3. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    No, 92144A in the diagram is p/n 92144-1844, the pad spring which snaps into the rear of the caliper body. I did in fact replace that as part of my rebuild, though I probably did not need to.

    The anti-squeal shim I'm referring to clips over the back of one of the brake pads. It is not shown on the parts diagram.
  4. MFP

    MFP Urbaner

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    What website was this grabbed from?
  5. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Long timer Supporter

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    I've had some aftermarket brake pads on other bikes that would not fit the shim due to the thickness of the pad. I'd pitch it in the parts drawer just in case, but likely not an issue.
  6. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    Sorry about the mistake above; I've put pads on a bunch of bikes and never saw any of them use a shim clipped to a pad. Live and learn I guess.
  7. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    partzilla.com. Not affiliated with revzilla. :)
  8. Sniperx

    Sniperx Long timer

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    How do you remove the headlight brackets? I can’t find any fasteners. I havent taken off the headlight yet, maybe they just pop off.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    You mean the black brackets that hold the headlight bucket?

    They slide over the fork tubes. So you have to either remove the handlebar and upper triple clamp, or remove the front wheel, loosen the triple clamps (upper and lower) and pull the forks out from the bottom at least far enough to get the brackets off.

    See the photos in my article about the steering head bearings:

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/new-to-me-2000-kawasaki-w650.514600/page-378#post-35856460
  10. abhiram

    abhiram Been here awhile

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    AH! should have checked this. Kinda picked up most of these individually from the local ace hardware.
  11. abhiram

    abhiram Been here awhile

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    Hi all,

    I am planning on check the valve clearances next weekend. Right now, the bike has around 24,800 miles on it.
    Except for the silicone sealant, I believe I have everything I need (shim kit and a new head gasket).

    Any suggestions. Google thinks yamabond is a good bet?
  12. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    Your mileage may vary, but when I pulled the cam cover to do the job, I left the gasket attached to the head, rather than remove it with the cover, just as The Jerk's tutorial photo shows. There was no sealant holding it to the cover, and I never broke the seal between the gasket and the head. He suggests it's easier to remove the gasket from the head and install it in the cover before closing up shop, but I wasn't aware of this so I didn't try it. No issues, however; no goop needed, no leaks afterwards...

    His post: http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/new-to-me-2000-kawasaki-w650.514600/page-53#post-18930843
  13. abhiram

    abhiram Been here awhile

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    I see. it looks like you didn't touch the gasket at all. Hopefully, I can take the cam cover easily.
    I amma grab some coffee and go over Jerk's tutorial. You folks rock!


  14. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    I was careful and intentional while removing the cover to make sure the gasket didn't pull up with it - but no problems...
  15. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    If you don't have one, a cheap magnetic "parts grabber" is handy to remove and place the shims if that becomes necessary. You don't want to drop those shims down into the nooks, crannies, and oil passages in the head . . . .
    abhiram likes this.
  16. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    ^ this, definitely!
  17. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    Some more about carb tuning.

    So some time back, earlier this year, I went about slapping in a Factory Pro carb kit which involved swapping main jets from 118 (stock) to 110. Also involved was replacing the stock Kawasaki needles with the Factory Pro versions which have a different taper and are adjustable for needle height. If I remember correctly I kept the stock #35 pilot jets and adjusted them for smooth idle and low speed running.

    I hadn't done a lot of riding since (sadly) but I had noticed a general increase in mpg around town. Around town I generally ride pretty conservatively, shifting at relatively low rpm and not winding it out too hard.

    I pulled the spark plugs the other day and they looked like things had been running on the leaner side.

    This past weekend I went for a hard ride upstate to scrub in some new tires. This was a welcome change from my normal riding, with lots of high rpm screaming and liberal use of the throttle. :D

    I fueled up just before leaving town and there was some highway cruising to get to the good stuff. I refueled after the highway part and after a little bit of twisties and calculated 71 mpg! Bike was running fine on the highway, cruising. However in attacking the twisties, I began to notice that if I was at ~3500 rpm or above and went to roll on the throttle, there would be a little bit of a lean stumble, almost like a hesitation. Same with cruising steady-speed at say 4000 rpm, could feel a bit of a lean surge. 71 mpg is great, but it's a little too great. Indicative of a lean mixture.

    Tested my theory by pulling the choke out ever so slightly and that extra bit of fuel made the engine come alive at the higher rpms (though it made it run like crap at idle because it's already rich enough at idle). The engine felt/sounded much happier and had a lot more power.

    So it looks like I need to do some additional tweaking of the carbs. My thinking is that I don't need to swap in larger main jets at this point. I am first going to try adjusting the needle height (I can't remember what my initial setting was) to make it richer in that midrange zone and see if that solves the problem.
  18. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    Good info.

    I tried raising the stock needles using tiny washers and the stock jets. It was really easy to do, but the result was lower mpg and no discernible increase in power. Took those back to stock and played with the air screws a bit. They're out from stock though I can't recall the number of turns. I don't have a good enough ear to tune the air screws by sound alone.

    The bike seems happy and the dyno results (@49.6 hp and 41.1 ft-lbs torque peaking mid-range) are good enough for me. MPG varies between 45 around town and in the winter to close to 60 on those delightful winding country roads in the summer. 45-55 has proven more realistic for most highway riding.

    It's nice to see folks reporting their results. After reading here and the Yahoo Group files, it seems to me the Kawasaki engineers did a good job when they designed these things. Dyno runs and plug checks can tell a story.
  19. jimbo-drxc

    jimbo-drxc Adventurer

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    2 question you guys can surely answer please:
    what size are the male bullet connectors on the stock turn signals? Got some after-market signals with bare wires & don't want to cut the ones off the originals. Can't find those skinny Kawasaki ones anywhere, although I haven't tried a Kawasaki dealer yet.
    Other question I asked last week - how do the 2001 model tank knee pads fit on? Is it the same fitting on the tank as the 2000? Can the early ones be fitted to the later tank in other words?
    Many thanks.
  20. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    I guess one question I have that would help my understanding in this carb tuning excercise is:

    Does anyone know if the choke (enricher) pulls its extra fuel via the main jets or does it pull directly from the float bowls?