New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    Remove throttle cable from carbs...

    I’ve been avoiding lubricating my throttle cables because I can’t figure out how to lubricate them without disconnecting them in order to free up an opening, and to have them vertical enough for the lube to coat the whole cable. I’ve read claims that that some cables have teflon-lined housings, and don’t need lubrication, but I don’t know if that’s the case with my bike. I believe I've got OEM cables and the factory manual includes lubricating the cables in their periodic maintenance procedures. So, time to remove the throttle cables from the carbs and juice them up...

    Back when I removed my carbs, I had no trouble removing the cables after I disconnected the carbs from the engine. This is how The Jerk (progenitor of this illustrious thread) describes the process in his “Removing the carburetors” tutorial. But guess what? Removing the cables from the carbs while they’re in situ can be a real pain. I’ve found this to be so, and I’ve heard others say the same. I’ve seen a number of guys describe how they did it; usually along the lines of, “I just messed around with them and suddenly it worked!” This time, though, I paid attention to what worked for me, and since I’ve found The Jerk’s tutorials very helpful, I thought I’d try to write up what I did in a similar style. Although I know many of you don’t need this, hopefully some newbies will find it useful.

    First, some terminology. Sorry if I’ve gotten it wrong, but I couldn’t find "official" names for some of these parts in the Kawasaki sources, so I had to wing it a bit. I think it’ll be obvious anyway. Here’s a photo of the carbs off the bike, with three labeled items of interest:

    01 carb_notated.jpg


    Item 1: Kawasaki calls this a “fitting.” Because it connects the carbs to an air vent, I’m calling it the “air vent fitting.”

    Item 2: I’m calling this the “cable bracket.”

    Item 3: Kawasaki doesn’t name this rotating plate that the cable ends pull on. Honda, in the 70’s at least, called it a “throttle lever plate,” so that’s what I’m calling it here.

    The go-faster cable that opens the throttle will be the “open-cable”, and the go-slower cable that closes the throttle will be the “close-cable.”

    Finally, even though some of my photos were taken from the right side of the bike for clarity, I did everything while standing on the left side of the bike, just reaching over the seat with my right arm when I needed to, and occasionally looking over the same way. I just couldn’t take sensible photos from that position. Also, I’ve removed my vacuum-actuated components, so you won’t see vacuum lines attached to the carbs - instead the vacuum ports are plugged with red silicone caps.

    On to the show!

    1) Remove the fuel tank. Straightforward, but if you’d like some guidance, look to The Jerk’s carb removal tutorial (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=11105382&postcount=29), step 3, about a third of the way down.

    2) Remove the clip which secures the two cable housings to the carb cable bracket. There’s a little tang facing inwards on the bottom of the clip, slip your finger in and pop it outwards (the clip stays attached to the close-cable). Photo, taken from the right side:

    02 cable clip.jpg


    3) Slacken cable adjusters at the handlebar. Quoted right from The Jerk’s carb removal post: “increase the cable freeplay at the throttle grip (loosen the locknuts and spin the adjuster nuts clockwise)”

    I found that the easiest way to proceed from here is to first free up the close-cable ball-end, then disconnect the close-cable housing. Next, disconnect the open-cable housing, and finally, free up the open-cable ball-end.

    4) Free up the close-cable ball-end: there should be enough slack in the close-cable (closest to the front of the bike) to move the wire forward, using a finger (or perhaps a round screwdriver shank, or wooden dowel, or something else that won’t injure the wire) halfway between the cable ball-end and the metal cable housing. The ball-end should pivot in the throttle lever plate from back to front, until the wire reaches the slot at the front of the throttle lever plate. Wiggle the wire outwards (right to left) through the slot, bringing with it the ball-end. Two pics for reference, the first taken from the left side of the bike, the second from the right side:

    03 Close cable 1_notated.jpg

    04 Close cable 2_notated.jpg


    5) Remove the metal end of the close-cable housing from the cable bracket: simply lift the metal end until it clears the cable bracket, then pass the wire inwards through the slot in the cable bracket. That’s the close-cable free.

    6) Now remove the metal end of the open-cable housing from the cable bracket in the same way. As you raise the metal end to clear the cable bracket, the throttle lever plate will rotate quite a bit - this is now possible because the tension of the close-cable has been released. Like before, lift the metal end until it clears the cable bracket, then pass the wire rearwards through the slot in the cable bracket.

    7) Next, remove the open-cable ball-end from the throttle lever plate. With the throttle lever plate at rest, you need to move the wire from front to back to pivot the ball-end quite a ways down, almost 180 degrees, so it will clear the slot and can be removed (in the next two pics, ignore that the metal cable housing end is still in the cable bracket):

    05 open cable 1_notated.jpg


    It looks like it might be easier if the throttle lever plate were rotated (open throttle), making the ball-end easier to reach and reducing the amount of pivoting needed to free the wire to only about 90 degrees:

    06 open cable 2_notated.jpg


    ...but I found that fighting the spring action of the throttle lever plate and the proximity of the air vent fitting actually made it more difficult. So I left the throttle lever plate alone and instead lowered the now-released end of the cable housing right down near the ball-end, as seen in the next pic (strange angle and clarity, as it’s grabbed from a video), which gave me plenty of slack to pivot the wire all the way down to the slot and pop the ball-end free (inwards, from left to right):

    07 open cable 3_notated.jpg


    And your cables are free of the carbs!

    Installation really is simply the reverse of removal: lube the ball-ends and cable housing ends as desired, then install the open-cable ball-end in the throttle lever plate and the metal end of the open-cable housing in the cable bracket. Then install the metal end of the close-cable housing in the cable bracket, and finally the close-cable ball-end in the throttle lever plate.

    One tip for accomplishing the latter, installing the close-cable ball-end in the throttle lever plate: with the metal end of the cable housing already installed in the cable bracket, I positioned the barrel-shaped ball-end with the flat inserted into the opening of the throttle lever plate, as if I was trying to slide the ball-end into place (left to right) without pivoting it around so the wire cleared the slot. Basically, it’s in correct alignment and position, but it’s only “half-inserted” and the wire is outside the throttle lever plate instead of inside. Then to pivot it into final correct position, I held light inward-facing pressure on the ball-end with the flat of a flat-blade screwdriver in my left hand (I was standing on the left side of the bike). At the same time, reaching across with my right hand to the opposite side of the bike, I used the round shank (gentle on the wire) of a phillips screwdriver to pivot the wire forward. As soon as the wire reached the slot, the light pressure of the flat screwdriver pushed the ball-end home, and the wire rotated back into correct operational position.

    Reattach the clip which secures the two cable housings to the carb cable bracket, adjust the free play of the throttle cables using the adjusters, reinstall the fuel tank and you’re done!

    EDIT: an experienced member of another group suggests that if you're forgetful or easily confused, it helps to put some sort of mark on one of the cables and its matching cable bracket opening so you won't get the cables switched when reinstalling...
  2. epb

    epb Been here awhile

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    Bors likes this.
  3. BravoFox

    BravoFox Twin With a Kick

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    Only cosmetics, except perhaps for the dashboard... No radical frame or engine alteration, which is all the better.
    The paintjob looks fab.
  4. GerardW

    GerardW Been here awhile

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    This bike is for sale here by us. It is pristine and the 'look' is just right. I have a terrible itch.
    W3.jpg
    uemac, Scoozi, Bors and 2 others like this.
  5. msahern5

    msahern5 Jumping at Shadows

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  6. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    I agree on the paint. I wonder what dented up that poor tank? :(
  7. BravoFox

    BravoFox Twin With a Kick

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    I still like my rough looking old girl better... Best ride to go to the bakery next village.... :-)


    IMG_1182.JPG
    Bors and Tritwin like this.
  8. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    That baguette looks like a puncture injury waiting to happen...
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  9. Scrivens

    Scrivens Long timer

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    I always remove those return cables on my bikes and keep them as spares in case the main cable breaks as they serve no purpose except as a "safety feature". Less pressure needed to operate the throttle and one less thing to wear out.
  10. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Long timer Supporter

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    Easiest shim system I've ever checked and adjusted. Its as simple as my DR650 with screw/locknut style adjusters. Its a 30 minute job after you've done it once.
    Speedo66 likes this.
  11. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    Well, as long as you've got the correct shims on hand, should there be any adjustment needed. :D
    Speedo66 likes this.
  12. BravoFox

    BravoFox Twin With a Kick

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    Matt, the famous French proverb is actually "That baguette looks like a sandwiche waiting to happen"... :D
  13. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    Great. Now I'm hungry again...
  14. Sniperx

    Sniperx Long timer

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    Yay!!! It was just a busted accelerator pump diaphragm!!! Cheap and easy. Wish I had known that ...I would have done it myself.
  15. msahern5

    msahern5 Jumping at Shadows

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    Has anybody here ordered an exhaust from Japan? I’ve been looking at Webike and there is a high level exhaust from FRC. I can’t find much info on FRC or alternatives. How has others experience with Webike been in general? The websites have limited product reviews but it is software translated from Japanese which is laughable at best and my Japanese sucks.

    I am really looking at building something (without permanent modification) like a 60’s Japanese scrambler. I know, not a very original plan, but it’s what I want.
  16. BravoFox

    BravoFox Twin With a Kick

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    Webike is a store, not a brand. It's like Louis in Germany/Europe....

    The issue when ordering from Asia when you are in the US (or Europe) is the exhorbitant shipping charges (especially for big parts, Webike using express courier only for exports) and the potentially nasty surprise of duties & taxes. It could amount to double the price of the parts ex-works.

    Some have done it anyway and "got lucky", their parts flowing thru Customs unchecked, others got hit big time.

    I do not know the tariff rates for motorcycle parts, but any decent freight forwarder can find out the rate and tell you over the phone.
  17. msahern5

    msahern5 Jumping at Shadows

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    Bravo Fox, thank you for the reply and information. I understand that Webike is a store. The exhaust brand was FRC. They list a choice of shipping methods and rates including DHL and Fed Ex, and you are right it is not inexpensive. Not sure of duties and taxes to the US (the current administration may have declared imported motorcycle parts a national security threat). I have had smaller items shipped from Japan by DHL with good luck but spending $750.00 plus shipping for an exhaust system of unknown quality is a bit different.
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  18. mattsz

    mattsz moto-gurdyist

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    I purchased a couple of small items from Webike (two small tank badges and a seat mounting bracket) - shipping to the east coast of the USA was less than $7. I know that's not an exhaust system, but I was surprised at how little they charged me. That's cheaper than most domestic shipments...
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  19. BravoFox

    BravoFox Twin With a Kick

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    No problem mashern5...
    US Customs have a invoice value threshold under which the freight sails thru... I remember it to be USD75 (raised to USD250 during the Xmas peak season) when I worked in America, but that was a couple decades ago.

    Again call a airfreight forwarder and them what the import duty rate is for motorcycle parts... It's an exhaust line, pretty straight forward.
    msahern5 likes this.
  20. Sniperx

    Sniperx Long timer

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    A company here in Japan recently released levers for the W650. Its a typical modular design with adjustment lever or knob. There are a few different lever designs including a folding one and many different colors. They’re about 100usd.

    View attachment 1637012