New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
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    I pulled my fuel tank off my 2001 W650 to clean it out, clean the petcock
    filters, and change the spark plugs.

    I was surprised to find NGK CR7E plugs in the bike instead of the recommended
    CR8E plugs.
    http://ngksparkplugs.com/part_finder/motorcycles/step4.asp?id=5076&type=reg

    My bike only had 2500 miles on it when I bought it last years so I assumed the
    plugs had never been changed. I have 6000 miles on it now and the plugs really
    didn't need to be changed but I went ahead and put the CR8Es in. The CR7Es were
    black with carbon.

    "NGK Spark Plugs Heat Rating

    The spark plug heat range has no relationship to the electrical energy
    transferred through the spark plug. The heat range of a spark plug is the range
    in which the plug works well thermally. The heat rating of each NGK spark plug
    is indicated by a number; lower numbers indicate a hotter type, higher numbers
    indicate a colder type."

    On the test ride afterwards it seems to have better pep but that might just
    be a placebo effect.
  2. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    Z-Power is one place or you can go to the W650 shop which is in Germany. Check the exchange rate to see which is gonna give you the better price. Also if you know the part numbers you can order from CMSNL which is in the Netherlands - I ordered the parts for the removal of the air injection system from them.

    I don't know if you can order non-US parts from Kawasaki USA if you have the part numbers. I've never tried but if you have a cooperative dealer, maybe give it a shot.
  3. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    80
    Alright,


    • LSL Flat Track Seat Ordered
    • Short Clutch/Throttle/Brake cables ordered
    • Emgo Handlebar Reducer Shims ordered
    • Tank out for painting
    I was looking back at the guide on how to install the shorter throttle/clutch cables and I was a little unclear on the throttle cable part. So both cables have the 90 degree bend where they thread into the controls, but since they have the same rise, you cannot use both new cables? The cables I ordered had two different item numbers:


    THROTTLE CABLE Open: 54012-0003

    THROTTLE CABLE Close: 54012-0004


    When threading the throttle cables into the controls, you should do so with out connecting them to the carbs correct? I guess I don't really understand how you thread them into the controls because of the right angle bend in the cables. Won't they interfere with one another? Thanks again for all the info! I'll be sure to post photos once the bike is finished.
  4. pumps

    pumps Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    Finally got my son to take some pictures with his new Canon camera. I don't suppose anyone has knowledge of W650 t-shirts? Otherwise will try to make one.
    [​IMG]
    Was thinking of putting something like this on the back. Mostly black and white or gray and the url for the W650 riders group on the left front.
    I've a son who pretty good with photoshop.
    [​IMG]
  5. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    The shorter cables on a low bar should follow exactly the same route as the stock cables on the high bar, so just take notes, photos, or run string along their path.

    I've always had decent luck disconnecting cables at the carbs first, and reconnecting them at the carbs last.

  6. pumps

    pumps Adventurer

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    If you have issues with getting the routing correct, in the service manual's appendix there are routing diagrams.
  7. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    80
    Hello hello!

    I'd love to hear what your start-up procedure is with the W650. Again, I've only had the bike a few weeks and now the tank is off getting painted. I used to have a 2008 Triumph Bonneville and I've found that the W takes a bit longer to warm up. If it's a 70 degree day and I try to start the bike without using the choke, it will idle very low, but if I choke it, it'll race up to 2500-3000rpms which feels too high. I've been turning it on and using the idle adjustment screw to bring the idle up to around 1200 rpms and then adjust from there while riding. Where do you set the idle on your W?

    Lastly, on the last long ride that I was one, there were a few times where I would pull in the clutch to coast and while coasting, the engine would shut off. RPMs dropping all the way to zero. I could turn the bike right back on, but I'm curious as to why this would happen. Thanks very much!
  8. pumps

    pumps Adventurer

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    Location:
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    The service manual says to set idle speed on a warm engine at 900 rpms +or - 50 rpms.
    I use the choke in the morning before I go to work and it will come up to 2000 or so . I'll give it less choke to get it to come down.
  9. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    How long do you find yourself having to keep the choke closed for when heating it up?
  10. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    The choke on the Dubya's seems to be particularly sensitive. When cold a tiny movement of the lever will result in a big change in RPM's. Choke would stay on for a mile or two, and even then the idle would be low. If I reset the idle when still cold, then it would idle much to fast when completely warmed up.

    In terms of start-up and choke usage, the best thing I did was adjust the pilot air scews. Got the covers off with a 90-degree dremel, and adjusted them about 3-3 1/4 turns out. Haven't seriously tweaked them since. But even that rough adjustment lets the bike run a bit richer at idle, and warm up faster.
  11. pumps

    pumps Adventurer

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    When I have the choke on to go to work I usually start it, ride from the back yard through the gate. Park it on the side stand, go back and lock the barn, close the gate. Put on my gear and go , with it still on for three blocks to get on a main street and then I let the choke off. Maybe 5 minutes? The idle comes down fine it seems and it's good to go from there.
  12. Scrivens

    Scrivens Long timer

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    The EFI on the W800 is the same - the fast idle circuit runs for several minutes on a cold morning. It usually drops back to the 900rpm idle around a mile or so from home. Makes things a bit tricky if the traffic is slow.
  13. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    Attempted to replace chain and sprockets today. Attempting to remove the front sprocket nut with hand tools = exercise in futility. Gonna have to take it to my mechanic buddy with an air gun.

    If you do attempt it, you need a 27mm deep socket and lots of both luck and upper body strength + a friend to stand on the rear brake pedal while you try to break the nut loose.
  14. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    You can get an electric impact wrench for Harbor Freight for cheap. Should break that nut loose easily. Handy tool to have around . . . .
  15. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    I had to hammer the hell out of that nut with my impact wrench to remove it when I replaced the sprocket with a plus one tooth one. Can't imagine why it needs to be so tight from the factory.
  16. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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  17. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    This link has pictures on how to remove the cap off carb adjustment screws, and screwing them 3 1/2 turns out. I did this mod and found it helped with cold starting and warmup. http://www.captainjakes.com/w650/fuelcaps/fuelscrews.shtml

    Unfortunately, the link for his other mod, shimming the carb needles, is no longer functioning. I did that also, and between the two, changed the lean condition for starting and running better.
  18. JadeRider

    JadeRider Been here awhile

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    What a cool bike. Love it. Congrats man
  19. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Transient

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    Went in for the annual inspection last week, and was told although I'd pass, new tires were recommended as the rear was getting flattened in the center.

    Bike has about 4,500 miles on the original tires (I know, I know), figured it might be time for a change. Might even change the 11 year old tubes. :D

    The tire of choice here for these bikes had been the Bridgestone BT45. I looked at Motorcycle Superstore and they have them in both H and V rated versions. The ad copy for the V mentions dual compounds, harder for more mileage in the center, softer with more grip on the sides.

    So my question is, is there now a better tire choice for the bike, if not, which version of the Bridgestone is recommended? How are they on mileage? What sizes are you using?

    I await your wisdom oh learned tire gurus.
  20. rheritage

    rheritage Been here awhile Supporter

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    Bridgestone Spitfire's also known as S11's, great tire for these bikes and cheap.

    Good Luck!

    Rich