New (to Me) 2000 Kawasaki W650

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by The Jerk, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Kentucky

    Kentucky Long timer

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    And answered SPYKE.
    Barry
  2. The Jerk

    The Jerk Bring us some fresh wine!

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    So 15,000 miles rolled around and it's time to check the valve adjustment and the carb synch.

    Checking the valve adjustment was fairly straightforward and not as involved as on, say, a modern Triumph triple. Mostly because there's a lot less stuff on the W to get out of the way before you can pop the cam cover off. So here we go:

    Ensure that the engine is stone cold. That means that it should not have been run overnight. Do not do valve adjustment on a warm engine.

    First, remove the seat, then remove the fuel tank. That's been covered in detail in prior articles - two bolts at the rear, disconnect the fuel and vacuum hoses to the petcock, and don't forget about the two drain hoses toward the rear of the tank. Pull the tank rearward then lift it up and off the bike and set it aside somewhere safe.

    Next thing to do is remove the "spark plug hole holder covers" as they are called in the service manual. These are the caps each held in with two small Allen bolts on each spark plug hole. Remove the spark plug wires by pulling straight up and set them aside. Then remove the two Allen bolts, stick your finger in the hole, and wiggle the holder covers up. You will probably be able to get them to move a bit under finger power just enough to get a flat screwdriver in between each ear and the cam cover, then pry each side (gently!) in order to get them to pop out. Set them aside.

    [​IMG]

    The service manual doesn't say it, but you should also go ahead and pull the spark plugs. This mileage is a good mileage to inspect them and replace them if necessary, but also removing the plugs will make it easier for you to turn the engine over by hand later. A lot of spark plug sockets are too big for the spark plug holes on the W but the spark plug wrench included in the under-seat toolkit is perfect. Just put a 17mm wrench on the end of it and take the plugs out. If you plan to re-use them, make sure you put them down in a way where you can put each one back into the cylinder it came out of.

    Next you need to remove the decorative bevel gear cover on the right side of the engine. There are two small Allen bolts holding it on. Between the cover and the head are two small nylon washers. Make sure you don't lose them as they tend to fall out when you pull the bolts out. Once you remove the bolts, lift the cover straight up to remove it and set it aside.

    [​IMG]

    Now you're ready to remove the cam cover. If you still have the air injection system installed, you need to get that out of the way first. Simply disconnect the rubber hoses at each end from the airbox pipe and from the exhaust ports as well as the small vacuum line to the valve, then set the air injection valve aside. Clean off the top of the cam cover, then remove the six cam cover bolts (10mm as I recall) and set them aside so you can keep track of where they came from.

    [​IMG]

    Now you are ready to pop the cam cover off. It should come pretty easily but if it's stuck, Kawasaki has kindly provided a couple of ears at the front where you can use a screwdriver to pry upward to unstick the cam cover. Pull it up, work it out from under the frame and set it aside.

    Now go to the left side of the engine and remove the rotor bolt plug and the timing hole plug. Use a large flat-blade screwdriver and you may wish to use a cloth between the screwdriver and the cover so as not to scratch the finish.

    [​IMG]

    Unscrew both covers and set them aside. The rotor bolt hole gives you access to a bolt at the center of the rotor which you can use to rotate the engine via your ratchet and a socket. The timing hole gives you a visual on the edge of the rotor where there is a timing mark engraved. There is a corresponding notch in the threads in the timing plug hole. I'm an asshole and forgot to take a picture of this, but what you do is get your ratchet and turn the engine counterclockwise via the rotor bolt until the timing mark on the rotor aligns with the notch in the timing hole.

    This tells you that one of your pistons is at TDC on the compression stroke which is where you need it to be in order to check the valve clearance. However, it doesn't tell you which one! So you have to look at the position of the camshaft relative to the rocker arms to see which cylinder's valves are "off the cam" so to speak. So if it helps, rotate the engine around a few times while you observe what's happening up on top with the camshaft and valves. When that timing mark comes around, one of the cylinder's rocker arms will not be on the camshaft lobe while the other one will be. You want to check the valves for the cylinder whose rocker arms are not on the cam lobes.

    [​IMG]

    The intake valves are the ones to the rear of the engine and the exhaust valves (not visible in the photo) are the ones toward the front of the engine. This is important because the specs are different. The intake valves run cooler because the incoming fuel/air charge cools them off quite a bit. Therefore they can have a tighter spec than the exhaust valves. The exhaust valves naturally get quite hot as all the hot combustion gases are forced past them.

    The range of acceptable valve clearance for the intake valves is 0.08-0.13 mm while for the exhaust it's 0.14-0.19mm. As long as the clearances are somewhere within that range you don't technically need to adjust anything. Ideally the clearances should probably all be close to the middle of that range - something too close to the limit of the spec either way should probably be adjusted to bring it back toward the middle. With valves, you want to err on the side of looseness. A valve clearance adjustment toward the looser end of the spec might make for a noisier valve but it will also make for a cooler-running and longer-living valve - especially for the exhaust valves as any extra time they have in their seats is time they are transferring their heat into the cylinder head.

    So what you do is bust out your feeler gauges and see which gauges within the range fit the best through the gap between the rocker arm and the top of the valve. You may have to bend the feeler gauge a bit to get it to slide through the gap as straight as possible. The right feel is a very subjective thing - it should slide through the gap with some slight resistance. Not too much and not too little. Once you find the gauge that fits right, make a note of which valve and what the clearance is. Keep that as a record so that next time, if there is a change, you can get an early warning of a potential problem.

    Now, if you find that the gap is too tight or loose to be in spec, you're going to have to adjust. The way you do that is by replacing shims. This engine uses 7.48mm diameter shims. What you do is slide the rocker arm over, remove the shim from the top of the valve spring retainer, and measure it with a caliper. Then you do the math to figure out what size shim you need to bring the valve clearance into spec (there is a really nice table for this in the service manual). Then you go to your local mechanic and do a shim swap for the right size, put the new shim in, slide the rocker back over, then re-check your valve clearance to make sure you got it right. Repeat as necessary.

    I was lucky enough that all my valve clearances were in spec so I didn't have to adjust anything.

    Once you've finished checking all four valves on the cylinder that is off the cam, go back to the rotor and rotate the engine counterclockwise until the timing mark again aligns with the notch in the timing hole. At this point, the other cylinder should now be off the cam and you can repeat the procedure on that cylinder.

    Once you're done, you can start putting everything back together. I ordered a new cam cover gasket just to have on hand in case I messed the old one up during removal, but I was able to re-use the old one. It's easier to put the cam cover back on if you remove the gasket from the head and install it into the channel in the cam cover, then put the whole thing back in place as a unit. Reinstall the cam cover bolts and torque them to 9.8Nm.

    Re-install the spark plugs and torque to 13Nm, then install the spark plug hole holder covers and torque to 7.8Nm. Re-install your air injection valve if you're keeping it. Re-install the spark plug wires.

    Re-install the bevel gear cover and nylon washers and torque to 3.9Nm.

    Re-install the rotor and timing hole plugs, fuel tank, and seat. Fire it up, it should run great. Check for oil leaks around the cam cover gasket. If you have a bad one, it probably means you didn't get it seated correctly on re-installation.

    Now that you've done the valve adjustment, you can proceed to do the carb synchronization. So take the bike out for a nice long ride and really get it fully and completely warmed up.

    Once the bike is nice and hot, adjust the idle speed using the black knob on the side of the left carburetor. It should be 900 rpm ± 50 rpm. Don't adjust the idle speed unless the engine is fully warmed up.

    Now remove the two bolts that hold the fuel tank down. You're going to need to be able to lift the back of it up. Turn the engine off, remove the two vacuum hoses from the nipples on the tops of the carbs. Plug the hoses with whatever you've got handy. Hook up the hoses from your carb synch tool to the nipples. (Note, depending on your carb synch tool you may need to calibrate it before proceeding. Follow the instructions that came with it to do so).

    In the photo below you can see the original vacuum hose plugged with a socket and the hose from the carb synch tool hooked up to the vacuum nipple.

    [​IMG]

    Once you have your carb synch tool hooked up, start the engine and let it idle. I have the MotionPro tool that hangs from the handlebar and this is what I got when I fired it up:

    [​IMG]

    The idea is that the level of fluid in both columns should be as even as you can possibly make it. To adjust, there is a small Philips screw deep between the carbs and attached to the throttle linkage (I wasn't able to get a picture of it). You need to (very carefully) lift up the rear of the fuel tank and get in there with a stubby screwdriver, being careful not to burn yourself on the very hot engine. Then you need to VERY SLOWLY turn the screw without pushing down on it too much (because pushing down on it will open the throttle). This is the kind of adjustment where a very slight movement goes a long way, so try turning it one way first and see how the columns of fluid respond. If the disparity grows, turn it back the other way. Turn it very slowly and very slightly and give it time to settle out before making further adjustment.

    Take your time, go very slowly, and in the end it should look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    You can see that the levels of fluid in both columns are even.

    Note, depending on how long this takes you, you may have enough fuel in the float bowls for the engine to stay running but keep in mind that with the vacuum hoses disconnected, the fuel petcock is not opening and no new fuel from the tank is flowing into the carbs. So if this is taking you a few minutes, you may want to turn the fuel tap to PRI every once in a while to refill the float bowls so the engine doesn't stall out on you.

    Once you get the carbs synched, then shut the engine off, disconnect your synch tool and reconnect your vacuum hoses, bolt the fuel tank back down and re-adjust your idle speed if necessary to bring it back to spec.
    TonyKZ1 likes this.
  3. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    West of Seattle . . .
    Nicely done, sir! Excellent gouge and photos.
  4. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    80
    I'm potentially looking for some shorter front and rear fenders. The way I see it, I have a two options:

    1. Cut the current fenders down to a size I like
    2. Purchase some premade ones from W650 Shop, Daytona, Japan.Webike, etc.

    Curious if anyone has done either of these two and what they thought. Thanks.

    I think these are pretty sharp: http://www.bikeexif.com/w650
  5. folmonty

    folmonty twins make perfect moto music Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
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    Out West
    Haven't been here in a while. zwish, you'll find several options & ideas in the W650riders yahoo group. Search fenders and many threads should pop-up. Lots of Euro / UK involvement.

    Damn, "the jerk" has been busy! Some very informative postings. Props to you for sharing all your wrenching experience. Well done!
  6. joe camarda

    joe camarda Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
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    219
    Location:
    PACPALCALUSA90272
    I'm on the hunt...

    After considering several bikes I've settled on the W650. So, looking at several on eBay and CL I've found some out of state low mileage W650s that interest me. However, being a California resident poses a problem with the registration of the bike if it has FEWER than 7,500 miles and does not meet Californai emissions requirements.

    So I'm wondering if any of you who have W650s outside of California could kindly check your emission compliance label on the frame and tell me if the label specifically states that it meets CA emission requirements. Please...

    I'm simply trying to determine if all W650s sold in the U.S. are CA compliant.

    And.... Of course I'd be interested in hearing from anyone with a low mileage W650 they're interested in selling.

    TIA... Joe
  7. jmlmjmjm

    jmlmjmjm Long timer

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    Joe,

    Not all models are CA compliant. I bought one used from a gal in CA who bought it used with less than the required miles and therefore she coulld NOT regsiter it in CA.

    Good luck in your search.
  8. joe camarda

    joe camarda Been here awhile

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    John, thanks for the bad news...

    So I'm looking then for any W650 with greater than 7500 miles.

    Or

    If fewer than 7500 miles it must be CA compliant.... :ear
  9. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    Joe,
    All three of my W650s did not have the charcoal canister so no CA compliance but you should not have trouble finding a good W650 with 7500 miles.
  10. OaklandStrom

    OaklandStrom Long timer

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    My wife traded her Monster for a Hypermotard a while back, and it ended up being just a bit too tall. It made her really nervous to ride it, and since she's a rather petite gal, if it started to go over, she wouldn't have the strength to catch it.

    A family friend bought a W650 new and just doesn't ride it very often. My wife and I asked if it was for sale, and after thinking about it, he sold it to us. I think we got a smokin' deal, and we know the history of the bike. Sadly, I have to fly to Oregon and ride it home. :clap

    I can't wait for my wife to get back to riding, and honestly, I'm thrilled that the Motard isn't sitting in the garage any more. Hopefully, this is the perfect bike for her.
  11. joe camarda

    joe camarda Been here awhile

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    After sniffing around a bit I've found a very nice bike in Minnesota. The deal is nailed down and I am soon to be the owner of a red tanked 2001 W650 :clap
  12. ORexpat

    ORexpat Oregon Expatriate Supporter

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    West of Seattle . . .
    Welcome to all the new W650 owners!! :clap
  13. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    Oak,
    Congrats on your W650 er your wife's W650:evil.
    It is a very nice bike to ride around.
  14. OaklandStrom

    OaklandStrom Long timer

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    I work from home. She doesn't.
    She'll never know... :lol3
  15. WikdBeemer

    WikdBeemer Older but still riding

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Central Coast NSW Australia
    I cant see the fun in a HyperMotard, just a naked sports bike really.
    My G450X was awesome fun in motard mode, being super light and with tons of grip.
    It is now assigned to dirt only work since I got the W for the road (I need to keep my licence) :lol3
    The W actually gets quite lively over 5Krpm with the mods I have done and is very torquey below that.

    [​IMG]
  16. WikdBeemer

    WikdBeemer Older but still riding

    Joined:
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    Central Coast NSW Australia
    BTW, the seat of the W800 looks great - does anyone know if it will fit directly onto the W650?
  17. Scrivens

    Scrivens Long timer

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    The 800 seat isn't bad, but it could do with a touch more padding and it has a bit of a lip at the rear of the rider's part. I'm pretty thin but I can still feel it pressing against my butt. If you nip down to a dealer with an 800 on the floor they'd probably let you pop the seat and try it on the 650. Nice looking 650.
  18. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    80
    So I'm just about to get my tank back and I remembered one issue I was having before I sent it out to get painted. The engine died on me a few times If I was traveling at highway speeds (60-80mph) and I pulled in the clutch to coast. So instead of the revs just dropping back down to idle (900-1100 RPMs), they would just drop all the way to zero and the engine would turn off. Any input on what the issue might be? Thanks!
  19. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    Check the battery cable connecrions and the ground for tightness and good contact.

    Also is your battery in good condition?
  20. zwish

    zwish Adventurer

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    Battery should be good and hasn't shown any other issues since i've owned it. It always starts right up, all the lights are bright. I'll check the connections. I wouldn't have thought this was a symptom of a battery. I had assumed it might be running lean or something and all that wind rushing by at 70mph while the engine was essentially idling might have "put out the fire" so to speak. I'll let you know what's up with the battery.