New Xmax 300 !

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by wibble, Sep 16, 2017.

  1. RalphM

    RalphM Adventurer

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    One thing is sure the X-max is very economical on fuel, better than many smaller slower 2 wheelers.
  2. Wdoney

    Wdoney Adventurer

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    Renzo969, can you give us a little more information on the gear swap. Where you got it, how much $, how difficult was it to install, did you see a noticeable decrease in acceleration and how many rpm's did it drop. Sorry if it seemed like we were piling on. The XMAX in stock form does get very good mpg and I am sure with the higher gear you installed that it did improve. I guess how much is what we are curious about.
  3. kpinvt

    kpinvt OLDnSLO

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    The links Renzo posted up above did not work for me, try this one:
    https://oneteamstore.com/components/clutch-transmission-cvt-systems/tdr-gear-ratio?xpage=1&xoffset=0
    I just got through the link OK.
  4. byee

    byee Long timer

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    Vancouver, BC

    I added lights to my SMAX but added a normally closed reed switch need the latch mechanism. I affixed a flat rare earth magnet underneath the seat close to the reed switch. When the seat was closed, the reed switch is opened.

    Adjustments.JPG

    The light only came on when the seat was unlatched.

    Reed switches are very fragile. Encase in heat shrink tubing to keep it from shattering.
  5. Speedtrap

    Speedtrap Adventurer

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    I have a handling issue that’s bugging me with the Xmax that I haven’t seen mentioned here, so I'm wondering if it's just an isolated case or not.

    Brief history, I purchased the bike from a member here with 3300 miles in like new condition. I've put on about 500 miles, mostly commuting and some errands in town.

    My issue is an odd steering feeling from very slow speeds to about 45 mph. I really have to use a lot of constant counter-steer to turn (turning onto side streets, 90 degree corners, etc.). If I don't keep constant pressure on the handlebars the bike wants to stand up. It's a bit on an unnatural feeling. The sensation makes it feel like the front tire is low on air but I've had the pressure from 33 to the 29 psi the manual suggests.

    I've read a few accounts of this over the years on various bikes but I've never experienced it. I'm wondering if the steering stem bearings are improperly torqued. Because of all the plastics I'm not too excited about tearing into it. Or at least it would be easier on a conventional motorcycle. Anyhow, I'm wondering if anybody else's Xmax acts like this or if you've experienced this on something else and what the solution for you was? Otherwise its a very nice scooter and there's much to like about it.
  6. RalphM

    RalphM Adventurer

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    No problem on mine best handling scooter I have ridden,
    maybe get it on the main stand and front wheel off the ground see if you can feel any
    tight spots lock to lock or any other movement in the head bearings.
    I did see a report from a motoring journalist that the one he tested had a slight weave
    when flat out but I haven't had a thing and not seen any other complaints.
    what tyres are on it? mine has had City Grips from new.
  7. Moat

    Moat Been here awhile

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    I'd guess that it's not related to steering head bearings, as what you describe sounds more like what (front especially) tire profile would have a much greater influence on (which makes me wonder if it's currently the original OEM tires or not, how worn, etc...?).

    Loose headstock bearings make a scoot "flighty/jumpy" and unstable feeling overall - straight or turning. Tight bearings make the rider have to work a bit in maintaining a straight line and balance while rolling down the road - fighting its wanting to slowly weave from side to side, instead of just rolling along straight without much bar input. Not so noticed while turning.

    Bob
  8. CashCow

    CashCow Rocketeer

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    Mine steers very well.

    14,500 miles of Florida roads, city riding, mountains, New England, Wisconsin and interstate highways, never a problem with the OEM tire or replacement City Grip.

    Best steering scooter that I own.

    Bill
  9. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

    Joined:
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    @Speedtrap

    Mine steers well too. If there's a sort "shift" from the bike being very stable when upright and then falling into a corner it could be that the previous owner did a lot of sitting straight ahead on the highway and that you have flatspots on the tires. It makes the tire look something like this and it makes for a very badly handling bike.

    [​IMG]

    If this is the case the only thing to do is to change tires really. Just another reason I always stick to the backroads and never sit long stretches on the highway if I can help it. If you do end up changing tires don't put the stock ones on again, there are better ones around.
  10. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    Tires.
  11. ismatts

    ismatts Adventurer

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    Between Madison and Milwaukee
  12. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    Wow, that’s a smokin’ deal if they aren’t going to charge a grand for freight and setup. But I’ll bet they will!
  13. BigBaloo

    BigBaloo Been here awhile

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    Where to start...
    Firstly, counter steering is a misnomer imo.
    The steering input which turns the bike in the desired direction can't be "counter"
    Maintaining the control input.... apply steering input in a car, it turns, let go of the wheel while its turning, what happens?
    Why should a scooter or bike be different?
    My suggestion, stop thinking about steering control inputs, just think where you want the scooter to go and let it happen.

    (I've no idea how mine steers, 1300 miles in I've yet to think about it)
    Glen e likes this.
  14. CashCow

    CashCow Rocketeer

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    Counter steering is real.

    Bill
    Buspassdodger and DandyDoug like this.
  15. BigBaloo

    BigBaloo Been here awhile

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    Indeed it is real, my issue is with calling it "counter"
    Buspassdodger likes this.
  16. CashCow

    CashCow Rocketeer

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    I believe it is called counter steering because you push the handle bars away from the direction you want to turn.
    Steering counter to the turn.
    Seems simple to me.
    Bill
  17. DandyDoug

    DandyDoug Been here awhile

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    Keith Code wrote the most definitive explanation of this issue years ago in his books titled "Twist of the Wrist", I highly recommend Mr. BigBaloo check it out from his local library. Or better yet , buy a copy.
    Keith's lessons were, and still are taught to young racers who desire to really fill the need for speed.
    It's all about counter intuitive to what you might think turns a motorcycle, and it ain't the lean :muutt
  18. BigBaloo

    BigBaloo Been here awhile

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    Yes, that's why its called counter, but its the normal steering input ergo not counter. And that seems simple to me.
  19. BigBaloo

    BigBaloo Been here awhile

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    I have no need of books or lessons on how to steer a two wheeler, I've been doing it successfully for half a century now.
    Its something I didn't need lessons in, I just got on a bike and did it naturally.
    I'd been doing it for almost 20 years before I realised how I was doing it.
  20. Speedtrap

    Speedtrap Adventurer

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    The tire looks pretty good still but at some point I’ll switch over to City Grips as they’ve gotten good reviews.

    IMG_1068.JPG

    IMG_1067.JPG