New Xmax 300 !

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by wibble, Sep 16, 2017.

  1. Speedtrap

    Speedtrap Adventurer

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    BTW, thanks for everyone’s feedback.
  2. Moat

    Moat Been here awhile

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    Well, I haven't ridden an Xmax, but all bikes are different in that respect - some require constant bar input to keep from straightening up in a corner; some, from falling in deeper; while on occasion, you'll run across one that follows through a corner without much input at all, either way.

    And tires/profiles, their pressure, front brake drag, (that might be one worth checking) and the bike's loading - all can have an influence as well.

    It'd be nice (the definitive test) if you could compare another Xmax directly, side-by-side...

    Bob
    FreewheelBurning likes this.
  3. Wdoney

    Wdoney Adventurer

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    Its not normal steering. At low speed you turn the wheel to the left by pushing on the right handlebar and you turn left. At higher speeds you push on the right handle bar and you turn right. It’s counter to what happens at slow speeds. It might seem intuitive in practice but that does not make the term an inaccurate description.
  4. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

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    @Speedtrap

    Are you by any chance a.. 'heavier more muscular person'..? :D

    If you're on the heavy side, or have a lot of heavy luggage, it will compress the rear suspension and alter the head steering angle making it slacker. That will in turn make the bike a little bit more stable, upright and harder to turn. If you want you could try increasing the pre-load on the rear suspension 2-4 steps and see how you like that. It will also make the bike a little bit more nervous at high speed so it's a trade-off. We're not talking night and day differences here, but still noticeable.

    My x-max requires a little counter-steering in the corners, not much but a steady nudge and honestly that's the way I like it. I don't like bikes which are dead-neutral in the corners, I've ridden a few Hondas like that and I don't really like it. I want a little something to push against, when it's dead neutral it feels nervous to me. Old habits I suppose.

    P.S. Checking the head-bearing is easy with a centerstand. Just put it on the stand, tip it backwards (weight or bodyweight) and see that the steering is smooth from side to side and no play.

    P.P.S. I run my x-max with 10% lower tire pressures than recommended and low preload on the rear suspension because I like it stable at speed rather than jittery. The low tire pressures also help absorb bumps. I'm still on stock tires and weigh 180lbs with gear, just to have some reference.

    P.P.P.S Looking at the pictures is it possible that the previous owner changed the rear tire once but not the front? And that the front has a small flat spot? Kind of hard to see.
    Moat likes this.
  5. DandyDoug

    DandyDoug Been here awhile

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    That tire looks almost bran spankin new, look at all those chicken tit's . Come on now get leaned over a bit , drag a knee . Make all us scooter riders jealous.
  6. Moat

    Moat Been here awhile

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    Yes - good idea - bumping up the rear preload (ride height) to decrease rake/trail and consequently decrease the force required to hold in a lean.

    Bob
  7. RalphM

    RalphM Adventurer

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    Mine is set one stop from hardest, but I am on the heavy side, must eat less pies,
    tyres as the book though I do think they are a tuch high, it's on City Grips that
    most UK bikes seem to come with, and as I have said before it is the best handling
    scooter I have ever ridden. I had a Burgman 400 and that would try to run wide, I
    got into the habit of counter steering as in actively pushing on the bars on it and
    the Yam MT07 that followed it but I was trashing front tyres it the point tyre fitters were
    commenting on them, with the Xmax I made a effort to go back to leaning and letting things
    sort themselves out, out come is the tyre on the Xmax is at 12500 miles and still as life left,
    so dont like me go over the top with counter steering.
  8. FreewheelBurning

    FreewheelBurning Adventurer

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    I spent 1 year getting the drivers license for motorcycles (being allowed to ride alone without a teacher/experienced rider) and counter steering was a mandatory part of those lessons including being tested for it on practical exam.

    Another name my teacher (not English speaking) was "push technique".
  9. DandyDoug

    DandyDoug Been here awhile

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    When ever I hear a rider say " I don't need any books or training" I cringe inside. Yes, I know it's hard to get a motorcycle license in places and some training is involved, but IMHO it's never enough.
    Every time I take some type of M/C training I realize just how many bad habit's I have picked up , and wonder how much I have gotten away with by just pure luck. My goal has always been to take some kind of refresher training every couple of years .
    Since I'm just getting back to riding after a 3.5 year lay off from a stroke. I constantly work at getting my skills back and have plans to take some advanced rider training as soon as I can find something scheduled.
    Who knows , the life I save might just be mine.:-)
    CaptnJim and FreewheelBurning like this.
  10. BigBaloo

    BigBaloo Been here awhile

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    You missed out that I listed only one specific skill I don't need to read about or have lessons in.
    I've been steering two wheelers for half a century, think I've got it sussed already.
    What I am absolutely not saying is that people should avoid learning or improving their skills, that would be madness.
    Rest assured, I'm not mad.
    FreewheelBurning and DandyDoug like this.
  11. Blue&Yellow

    Blue&Yellow but orange inside...

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    If I held a competition for least mad person currently alive, and it was down to the last two combatants, and one of them blurted out "I'm not mad" I'd give the nudge to the other guy. Just saying. :hide
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  12. byee

    byee Long timer

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    Sorry to hear about your stroke. I had a TIA (mini stroke) 12+ years ago. Practise a healthy life style.

    I’m a self taught rider after I bought my 155cc scooter. Read the theory/safety books to pass my written exam. Practised religiously for the parking safety test then my road test.

    I’ve ridden with some 50 cc friends who don’t know the theory behind lane positions. They think riding in the right lane position in the right lane is the SAFEST since it allows you to see who’s coming into your lane so you can react.

    Another issue is the fact they don’t know how to stay in their own lane positions in group rides.

    Training is important but more importantly is the testing.
  13. Glen e

    Glen e Been here awhile Supporter

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    https://taiwanbigscootershop.com/co...aphomet-bubble-type-short-windshield-for-xmax

    Just thought I would give an updated opinion on this new windshield, it came out about two months ago , and instantly looked like it would solve one of my problems. In summer, around town the standard windshield is too hot, and the short Yamaha sport windshield really offers no coverage at all from any rain, hot air blast, bugs etc.… I’ve put 1000 miles on this new shield, This one does the trick. It is great around town and even on the highway, at 6 foot/31 inseam, I get really good protection all the way to the top of my helmet and just slight buffering on the absolute top of the helmet. I highly recommend it. It looks good too. I would estimate it’s 4 inches higher than the Yamaha sport windshield, And maybe 2 inch inches lower than the stock windshield. It is extremely nice to be able to look out over the entire windshield for the full range of view, without looking through any plastic, yet you still get decent wind protection.Quality of the product is very good, the actual screen is completely clear of any defects and the edges are nicely sanded and polished. It’s pretty cheap at $75 USD.

    If you are looking for a nice urban , summer shield that protects, I highly recommend this one.

    3rd pic is the yam oem sport shield for comparison.

    Attached Files:

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  14. RalphM

    RalphM Adventurer

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    Mine goes in for it's second new disc next week one or two bikes seem to be having this
    problem but most don't, so far it's warped one every 6000 miles or so.
  15. Glen e

    Glen e Been here awhile Supporter

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    You could probably help out a few people here if you would describe the symptoms of when it happens, cost to replace, is this warranty? Just some more details about a problem that may result every 6000 miles. That’s a serious defect.
  16. RalphM

    RalphM Adventurer

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    It's being done under warranty warped disc vibration under braking especially
    from higher speed believe me you would notice if you had the problem.
    They are going to investigate when they change the disc see if they can
    find a reason why just a few seem to do it.
  17. Wdoney

    Wdoney Adventurer

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    If its warping it likely getting overheated. Got a stuck caliper or dragging pads ?
    M.T. Hawk likes this.
  18. BigBaloo

    BigBaloo Been here awhile

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    The front disc looks very thin, haven't measured it though.
    Popular teaching of using mostly front brake is wrong for maxis.
    Both brakes together, let both discs share the work.
  19. kpinvt

    kpinvt OLDnSLO

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    Or a bent caliper mount? That's a total guess on my part.
  20. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    There are a couple of choices:

    1) Rotor mounting surface on the wheel is not true. As the rotor heats and cools it slowly deforms to the improperly machined wheel.

    This is easy to spot with a dial indicator, and I have actually shimmed behind rotors with .002” shim stock to make a new rotor run true on a less than perfect wheel.

    2) Rotor thickness variation, which is usually the cause of most brake pulsation people feel. Most brake pads have metallic content, and when the brakes are wet and the vehicle is parked some of that metal ‘rusts’ to the surface of the rotor. It gets scraped off the next time the brakes are used, but as the rotor heats and cools this residual metal changes the hardness of the metal on the face of the rotor, and a hard spot develops. The unaffected areas of the rotor wear more quickly than the hard spots, and the thickness variation causes pulsation.

    It is important to note that it takes approximately five thousandths of an inch of warpage (runout) in a rotor to cause pulsation, whereas it only take five ten-thousandths of an inch of thickness variation to cause pulsation.

    Instead of continuing to throw parts at it, measuring runout with a dial indicator and measuring thickness variation at 8 points around the rotor with a micrometer will easily reveal the problem. But since it sounds like there are a select few bikes doing this and it’s repetitive I’m betting on an improperly machined front wheel.
    CashCow likes this.