New Yamaha SR400 confirmed for USA

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by HondaFanatic, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. Toro5xi

    Toro5xi Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Bluffton SC
    Thanks for the info Brett. I may end up putting some bar end weights on but curious to see how the vibration effects my hands first. I’ve had mostly 4 cylinder bikes in the past and after 40 minutes or so my right hand would always start to go numb from the high frequency vibration.
    So far I am impressed with the fueling on this bike. I know it does not have a lot of power but there is no off idle stumble or lean bog that I can detect. Other than removing the EVAP canister I am thinking at this point I will leave the engine alone and focus on the suspension. I also would like to do the larger tires at some point soon. I’m not a fast rider but don’t want to be grounding anything on moderate turns.
    Chillis and Webman like this.
  2. luas

    luas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    gps signal lost
    I installed grab-on foam grip covers on mine. These also increase the diameter of the grip slightly, which in my case, may help reduce the tendency for my hand to cramp. I've never really found vibration to be a problem on the SR, it's just part of the "feel" of the machine that makes it what it is. With the type of riding and roads that I do, I'm frequently changing revs and gears, so the levels of vibration come and go. I would imagine that prolonged periods at constant speed might be a different story and in that case it sounds like changing gearing would be the way to go.

    A few months ago, I took Brett's advice and installed a set of SR500 footpegs and I agree that they make a nice difference. They lower the peg height about a half inch or so. They can be hard to find. New ones are no longer available from the parts suppliers. Some NOS for one side, but not pairs, show up on ebay. Used ones also don't seem to come around very often and when they do can be in rough shape. Eventually I found mine on ebay for a decent price but they needed TLC, paint and new rubbers. Brett, did you take those pegs off the bike before it was sold?

    I like the look of the Galaxy Blue 2018 model. I once saw one stuffed away in the corner of a dealer showroom, but never out in the real world.
    Webman likes this.
  3. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    11,054
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    I left the pegs on.
    I had ordered entire new assembly's when I got the bike, just in time I guess.

    I also put foam grips on most of my bikes. There are different brands and thicknesses, some are too thick for my taste, some just right,
    they are nice for old wrists and hands.

    The bars are rubber mounted, and if the mounts are not real tight it helps.
    The bike gets much smoother as it breaks in, maybe that is the rubber bits bedding in or something.

    One tooth more on the front sprocket helps with high speed vibration as well.
    I thought my SR was quite smooth.
    Chillis and Webman like this.
  4. Toro5xi

    Toro5xi Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Bluffton SC
    I just got done installing the Front Fork Upgrade Kit and wanted to share how it went.
    So far I have found this bike easy to work on. Everything came apart very easily but I'm glad I did this as some of the bolts were little more than hand tight and there was hardly any grease on the axle bolt. The biggest mistake I made was thinking I could get the damper bolt out just using air tools. For one side the impact took out the damper bolt but just spun on the other side. So after trying some light heat and compressing the fork I gave up and made a 17mm hex tool for the damper rod to hold it from spinning. I have wasted so much time over the years trying to use short cuts and then end up making the proper tool anyway. see attached pic for the hatchet job tool I made. took me all of 15 minutes, idiot.
    Putting the forks back together took some fiddling to get it all lined up. Under the damper rod is a white spacer the service manual calls a "Oil lock Piece". It turned sideways on me. I used a long drill bit to get it turned the right way and lined up with the damper rod bottom. I think a wood dowel would have been the best tool for this but I didn't have any laying around. I did drill 2 additional holes in each damper rod using a 17/64 drill bit. I had seen some posts where people used 4 additional holes and others used 2. I did 2 and figured if I had to could always add more but so far I am happy with the results.
    Once it was all back together I went to install the new Fork Caps with the preload adjusters and they were the wrong size. Right now I am using the original fork caps. I am gonna contact Vintage Spoke to see if I can just return the fork caps as the rest of the kit is very nice and I am happy with the results. I am running 15w fork oil and the front end is quite a bit firmer. There is little front end dive under hard braking and so far it does not seem harsh. I will be curious to see how it feels at higher speeds over some bumps or expansion joints.
    I am really enjoying this bike but need an enduro to go along with it. Really like the potential of the new Yamaha 700 Tenere but cant get past the looks. I am stuck with the older looking bikes. My last bike prior to this was a CB1100 2014. I am just not the target market for many of the new bikes. They seem to discontinue the bikes I like.

    Attached Files:

    Chillis and Webman like this.
  5. Webman

    Webman Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,071
    Location:
    Arizona
    Great project recap, much appreciated! I have a couple of questions, which I hope you can answer. First, did the fork caps have a different thread pitch, or was the diameter off, or was it something else that prevented them from fitting? The reason I ask is that some fork caps with preload adjusters require trimming the preload spacer, because the preload adjusters are significantly longer, meaning there might be fitment issues without the necessary trimming.

    The other question I had was about your damper rod tool; can you provide details such as sizing, length, etc? Any additional detail will be greatly appreciated.
  6. Toro5xi

    Toro5xi Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Bluffton SC
    The preload adjusters/caps are just slightly to large in diameter. I was able to compress the spring easy enough to get the threads down but they just wouldn’t engage. I could almost get it to catch but that was it. With the preload backed all the way off it didn’t feel like they were compressing the spring anymore than the OEM caps.
    To make the damper rod tool I just used a bolt with a 17mm hex head and welded it end to end with a piece of all thread I had. On the other end of the all thread I welded a 3/4 nut but it could be anything you could grab with a socket, wrench etc. My tool is 14 1/2 inches long and it is just long enough with the inner fork tube compressed. 16 inches would be better. The only important part is that 17mm hex end. A 17mm nut welded to an old socket with a 3/8 inch extension was my other thought.
    Really liking the ride result. Purposely hit some speed bumps and the front end is firm but no sharp jolts at all. I think I would just do the springs and cartridge emulators. The preload adjusters look trick but not needed I don’t think.
    Chillis and Webman like this.
  7. luas

    luas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    gps signal lost
    I am "shocked" that YSS would provide the wrong fork caps. I am curious what Vintage Spoke might have to say about it.
    Webman likes this.
  8. Toro5xi

    Toro5xi Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Bluffton SC
    Mine is a 2018 and the box does say up to 2017. I would doubt Yamaha changed something but I have been wrong before. I’ll see if I can get them swapped out.
    Chillis and Webman like this.
  9. RocketMan

    RocketMan Out Rocketing

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,304
    Location:
    Woodbridge VA
    When I removed the air injector I just taped the plug, didn't put any resistor in place and have zero issues. Can't say it didn't set any alarms in the control box, but never have had the engine warning light come and it's been without the injector for close to 28K miles now, go figure?
    RM
    Chillis and Webman like this.
  10. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    11,054
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    I think I had put a resistor in to put a load on things to protect the computer, but found it burned up and just left it open with no alarm.
    Other bikes WILL set an alarm, my TU250 does.
    Webman likes this.
  11. Toro5xi

    Toro5xi Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Bluffton SC
    Really liking this little bike. I am a little surprised about the vibration. So far it seems over say 4k rpm it is vibrating pretty seriously. I have had plenty of parallel twins in the past that didn't seem to vibrate this much. Around town it is no problem and I think it has plenty of acceleration. I think I like the light handling the most.
    I didn't like the look of the of the stock chain guard but didn't want to spend a lot of money on some of the aluminum ones I have seen so ended up purchasing a used one and cutting it up. Just a rattle can paint job but gave me the look I was going for.

    Attached Files:

    Chuck Pryce and Webman like this.
  12. Clem Fandango

    Clem Fandango Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2015
    Oddometer:
    367
    Location:
    Fairmount Hill, OR
    They do vibrate a lot. Keep an eye on your license plate, they have a habit of flying off into the ditch.
  13. Webman

    Webman Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,071
    Location:
    Arizona
    Toro5xi, I seem to remember Brett from NJ saying that his got smoother over time, as it rolled up the miles a bit. How many miles do you have on yours? It's not unusual for single cylinder bikes to smooth out a bit as they break in, but it's not likely to ever be as smooth as some fours. I have never understood the perception of fours as smooth, however; I've had two inline fours (Yamaha FZR600 and my current bike, a Yamaha XJ600 Seca II), and have ridden plenty of others, but never been happy with the high-frequency vibrations that come through the handlebars. This type of vibration always puts my hands to sleep, way faster than the bigger quakes I've experienced from big four stroke dirt bikes like the Honda XR600 and Suzuki DR. I admit I haven't ridden an SR, so I can't comment directly on the vibes you refer to, but I'm really interested in learning more about your situation.
  14. luas

    luas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    gps signal lost
    This bike vibrates

    This bike is under powered

    This bike only has a kickstarter

    This bike is too quiet

    I can't wait to take a ride
  15. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    11,054
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    The bike vibrates a LOT, its unbalanced so it will, but it has no rattle like most of the balance gizmo's have.
    The thing is, the rider is isolated from the vibration by rubber.
    Harley isolates the motor from the frame, Yamaha isolates the rider from the bike.
    The handlebars are rubber mounted, make sure the mounts have some play.
    Add bar end weights, I used some off a salvage TU250 I had, they worked great.
    Foam grips help some also, cheap, easy, many types for sale, nice besides vibration for old hands.
    SR500 pegs, lower, softer, bigger, the stock pegs are nasty.
    After 3000 or so miles, the bike seemed quite smooth at all speeds to me, before that and the mods it was a paint shaker.
    My TU250 has a high frequency buzz in the solid mounted bars which is more annoying then the SR400 was.
    My new KLX230 has rubber mounted bars, the rubber is very stiff but vibration is low...

    The DR650 also has rubber mounted bars and foot pegs, its a good idea!
    Webman likes this.
  16. Toro5xi

    Toro5xi Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Bluffton SC
    It does vibrate quite a bit but I really feel for once I knew what I was getting into when I bought this bike. Would it work on the highway? Would I want it to be my only bike? In both cases I think there may be better choices but for riding around town, going to the park, getting the mail I think it is really ideal. I originally thought I would buy a high mount exhaust and try and make it a scrambler but it excels at being what it is. I agree with some of the other posts on here that it would not be smart to try and turn it into something it was not meant to be.
    Before I bought this I was really thinking about a new Honda Monkey as I just wanted something to remind me of the days when I didn't need cholesterol medicine, blue pills etc but decided on the SR so I could take on the main roads if I had to. It is not always easy for me to get it started on the first kick but getting better.
    racer1735 and Webman like this.
  17. luas

    luas Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    234
    Location:
    gps signal lost
    two kicks when cold, one kick when hot, three or more kicks if someone is watching

    revs vs. gears vs. vibration levels vs. speed shall all fall into place as time and miles pass
    Webman likes this.
  18. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    11,054
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    My bike always started one kick when cold, every time in 20,000+ miles.
    The trick when hot is to put it at TDC THEN turn the key on and kick.
    99.9% of the time one kick, sometimes two.
    Before I figured that out, I had to sometimes kick it a bunch of times.
    If you flood it, you hold the throttle wide open and kick it a few times to clear out all the gas, holding it wide open at idle speeds shuts the injector off.

    With one tooth more on the front sprocket and one size larger tires, I thought the bike was very nice on the interstate at 70 to 80 mph.
    Webman likes this.
  19. gjl

    gjl Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2012
    Oddometer:
    46
    Location:
    Southwest Georgia
    I joined the club. I brought home this used 2015 yesterday. Fun little bike. When I got off the S10 and went for my first ride on the SR400, I felt like a bear riding a tricycle. My son is 17, so I am hoping to get him riding the SR400 by the end of the year. I am thinking about getting a magnetic tank bag for it, are any of you folks using one? If so, which model fits well? I know, pictures or it didn’t happen. The 2014 S10 has 55K miles on it, the 2015 SR400 has only 93 mile on it.


    E77FAF9C-D321-4CDB-B3E0-7C9E643654EB.jpeg
    Scoozi, jhonny ro, Bors and 3 others like this.
  20. RocketMan

    RocketMan Out Rocketing

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,304
    Location:
    Woodbridge VA
    :DTastes better, less filling:D

    After 5 years I decided it was time to start having some fun with this bike, looks wise and do some mods. So first major mod (besides removal of air injector and bigger front sprocket and tires) was to replace the flyscreen with something more sporting. Found a nice quarter fairing on Amazon for around $70, already painted a dark grey with gray windscreen that fit a 7 inch headlight so figured I'd give it a shot. Took some trimming around the upper fairing to clear the handlebars and controls, a bit fiddling with bar position and mounting hardware that came with it, but all in all, it seems to be working. Took it out for an initial test ride and have to say its a VAST improvement over the flyscreen. Much better wind deflection and comfort, less buffeting and even without the addition of some extra mounts (see pics below) amazingly stable. After adding some extra mounts for the upper part, trimming with my dremel tool cutting wheel and adding some rubber edging around the screen, looking pretty good.
    Since it had a small flat area under the screen, I thought what I great place to mount some instruments and move my volt meter from the handle bar inside the fairing and then added a clock, looking to add an air temp gauge as well. Display on the volt meter does not get so washed out in sunlight due to the smoked windscreen.
    After the first test ride, come home and told the wife "10% increase in HP, (to which she said "WTF" i.e. seriously
    doubtful), 20% increase in topend (Yeah, right!), beer tastes better, and you look even sexier than usual!" at which point she said, "well in that case, you just go for ride on that ANY OLD TIME YOU WANT!!":D:D:D
    After replacing the grips, that were getting pretty ragged, with ones that had little red "x's", I thought maybe I'll get some Red edging for the screen rather than the black and I found a car body shop near me that is owned by a biker who will do pin-stripes to match the tank around the outside edges for $50. And I am about half way to saving funds to get the tuned exhaust and Power Commander made specifically for the FI SR400 from Australia.
    So now the pics
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    RM
    Scoozi, jhonny ro, Nobade and 7 others like this.