(no longer) Utter Tiger 955i n00b

Discussion in 'Triumph Tigers' started by Duckworth, Apr 24, 2016.

  1. Pastaman

    Pastaman Been here awhile

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    Wow quite a trip! Glad you had fun. I just came back today from a 2700 kms trip on the St-Lawrence north shore (to the end of the road 138). Tiger runned strong. I checked oil consumption too and mine drank about half a quart over the trip (Motul 10w40 semi-synthetic) but I've done about 100 kms on gravel road at low gear and high rpm which may have increased consumption.

    I don't know what to recommend for the oil. Maybe worth asking the question on Tigertriple http://www.tigertriple.com/forum/index.php
    What kind of gas are you using? I know it can affect oil consumption also.

    A pic-video montage of the trip :)
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  2. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    I know that some 1050 Tiger riders use the Rotella T5 15w 40 for diesels in their bikes. I might do some experimenting now that I'm home. I was reluctant to while far away and riding hard. A bike shop guy in Pierre, SD told me that the farmers all started running heavy mineral oil intended for ag machinery in their ATVs, and all of their oil consumption issues stopped.

    Also, a tire report. The M40 Full Bores were up to the task. The rear was new for the trip, and has maybe 2k miles left. The front was half used up at the beginning of the trip. Front tread depth hasn't changed much. but it is weirdly and severely cupped now.
  3. Dyn Blin

    Dyn Blin Irn Bru Lover

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    It's the Rotella T-6 that is fully synthetic & a diesel favorite. I've run all my bikes with wet clutches (& no cat!) and personally really like the option. The T5 is a "blend", and while it's a very good oil, doesn't have the shearing or varnish resistance the T-6 does. Shared gearbox motorcycles dish out double the punishment.

    I personally wouldn't use Rotella T-5 in a bike with a wet clutch. There's some concern it may contain friction modifiers that will cause issue. I haven't looked on the T5 label for some time, but I don't recall it has a JASO MA-certification the last time I did a few years back. I know the RT6 does.

    I've found on long runs (I make trips at about half your distance a few times a year) I lose a bit of volume due to moisture being boiled out. Although, at most it's around a half a quart by volume in a Tiger-sized case. Also, any oil will shear at high temps and long mechanical-stress runs in the gearbox, making it effectively a thinner grade and more prone to being lost during combustion. One of the great effects of synthetics are their filming properties, which also account for a bit of loss during the compression stroke. I can't recall if you did a valve clearance check, but there's some potential loss there, too. Given the MPG you mentioned previously, I wouldn't think you have issues with worn rings or scoring.

    YMMV, I've personalty found an oil analysis can help eliminate some worries, and at the very least, give you a better idea of interval needed before change.

    11 5-600 miles days is going to put any bike through the paces. Sounds like an epic ride- share a ride report?
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  4. Dyn Blin

    Dyn Blin Irn Bru Lover

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    If you haven't yet, check fork oil level and condition. I've never used that tire. It may simply be prone to cupping. However, more often that not, a front suspension tune eliminated the problem when I've run into it on others.
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  5. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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  6. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    Okay, so tonight I dug into the bike for a valve check/adjustment. I was daunted at first by how involved it is just to remove the tank and get at the valves. In reality, it's time consuming, but not difficult.

    Here's what I found:

    The air filter was super clean; looked brand new.

    The spark plugs seem to indicate a really lean condition; the electrodes were white!:eekers

    As for the valves themselves, three intakes were tight; the left hand intake valve for each cylinder was .076mm or .003 inches.

    I have not yet gotten the shims out to see what size I need to bring them into spec. An inmate is graciously going to lend me his shim tool to do the deed.

    I find it peculiar that the same valve on each cylinder is out of spec by the same amount. I also wonder if this is causing the lean condition, and if not, how to correct that - cooler plugs?

    Could this be related to my oil excessive consumption?

    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
  7. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    I forgot to mention that the plugs are the iridium version. I'll replace them with the standard ones.
  8. Dyn Blin

    Dyn Blin Irn Bru Lover

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    Minds better than mine should weigh in, but although the valves should be adjusted within spec, the only reason they *might* contribute to oil loss is facilitating (not causing) blow-by with worn or deposited rings, and if they were very loose. You're not seeing evidence of worn rings in smoke or crankcase over-pressure or mileage loss. I wouldn't suspect leaky valve stems with no spark plug fouling or obvious smoke. Tight valves could well lead to a lean signature on the plugs, but I'm not sure that's what you're seeing there.

    Is your timing set correctly? If it's starting & idling well cold and hot, I would not expect an issue, but it's easy to check with the cover off: With Cylinder #1 at TDC, are cam arrows aligned inwards/towards each other?

    Might be worth a post in the Garage at this point.

    Oh yeah, almost forgot- don't forget to plug those cylinder/spark holes with a specialized and high tech product to prevent unneeded panic when you try to figure out where a bolt might have fallen to:


    high tech bore plugs.jpg

    Bore Plugs.jpg
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  9. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    The thing is, the bike starts and runs great. Great power, great mileage, smooth power delivery across the whole range. I wouldn't even be doing this except that it is nearly to 50k and I don't think valves have been dealt with since 25k, according to the records left from previous owners. In the records I have, the three valves which are out of spec now were at the tight end of spec back at 25k.

    While I have it opened up, I'm going to look for air leaks. I can't think of any other reason for the lean condition, except maybe for running lower octane gas on a fair bit of the Montana trip. Sometimes 87 was all that was available.
  10. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    Okay, valves adjusted (thanks for the use of the valve tool, Dyn Blin) and plugs replaced.

    However, upon start up it started kind of hard and rough, and is giving me a check engine light. I have taken it back apart (sigh) to check for any missed connections but I think they're all hooked back up right. Apparently there are one or two plugs that don't connect to anything?

    Any suggestions from experienced 955 people?
  11. Dyn Blin

    Dyn Blin Irn Bru Lover

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    Whoa, that tool got there quickly! And you worked even faster. did you make easy work of the shim removal?

    For me, it's easy to miss or (re) discconnect the fuel level sender (lower right from seated rider perspective), and will ping a CEL. The Ambient Air Temp sensor is easy to miss too, on the airbox, on the same side, and will also ping a CEL.

    There is one unused plug for models sold outside CA that would have been plugged into the carbon canister. It does not trip a CEL.

    If you find it's one of these, the CEL will reset after 3 full off-on-full-warm up cycles (I'm superstitious and remove the key between them).

    Rough running on reassembly might be traced to a few common items:
    • IACV gasket not fully re-seated when you replaced the airbox
    • IACV to throttle body hoses cracked or dislodged when you took off/replaced airbox
    • if you took the IACV hoses off the throttle bodies, it's easy to reconnect one to the "blank" on the IACV meant for a 4 cylinder Hinckley
    • Spark plugs gap tolerances
    The ECU may need to relearn the fuel trims- even without reader software, you can prompt a reset by the following steps (referred to as "adaptation" in TuneECU):

    Bike in neutral
    Engine temp 175-210 F ("normal" operating temp)
    Minimum airbox temp 70 deg F (ambient air temp)
    Clutch engaged (clutch lever out),
    blip the RPM to 3000 and let it drop back to idle,
    let idle for at least 30 seconds with the clutch engaged.
    Repeat at least 10 times (5 will normally be enough, but without a ECU software reading, 5 more won't hurt)
  12. dwarmker

    dwarmker Been here awhile

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    One thing to check that will cause the same symptoms (I've done it a couple times) is the fuel lines. If you switch the two, it won't run right. Make sure the pressure and return are where they are supposed to be.
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  13. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    I was careful to label those when I unhooked them, because I knew there would be a good chance that I'd mess them up!


    I was sitting here thinking, and I'm almost positive that I didn't put terminal nuts on my new spark plugs. Whoops, that would probably do it.

    I'm beat and it's after 10:00 here. I'll get back to it tomorrow.
  14. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    All back together and running properly, although the check engine light is still on. I assume that will turn off after I've ridden it a few times.
  15. Ironwood

    Ironwood Friday Harbor, WA

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    Mine resets in 3 heat cycles. Great motor!
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  16. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    I took it about ten miles to fill up the tank (yeah, I live in the sticks and yeah, CT actually does have "the sticks"). That check engine light is sure distracting. Two more rides or so ought to clear it, then.
  17. damurph

    damurph Cold Adventurer

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    I did my service at 40,000km (24000miles). Without access to the "required' tool I had to pull the cams but if you cable tie the chain to the sprocket when removing the cams you get the room you need without the chance of shagging up the valve timing. Retorqueing one of the cam caps is a PITA with the frame in the way but 5000 kms later and it is still running fine. Upgraded the fuel quick disconnects from plastic to metal as well.
    A great hooligan bike.
  18. Pastaman

    Pastaman Been here awhile

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    2500 kms trip with the Tiger (after the 20000 kms check-up with valves adjusted), runned super well, then sat for 2 weeks without running. Really difficult to start, the engine wouldn't fire as if it was not getting gas. Pump was priming as usual when turning key. Finally after several trials, it started, runned OK and restarted normally. Did a 60 kms ride and could hear backfire on decceleration at low speed (on 1, 2 or 3rd gear), I got 2 big "bangs" on decceleration that made the bike stall while no gas was given. When it stalled it started again right away. Then idle sounds like it wants to die and then comes back. Looks like the bike is running hotter based on the temperature gauge but it is also really hot down here. Other than that, stills run strong.
    Any ideas were to start?
  19. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    Maybe you got some bad gas? Water condensing in the fuel system when it sat unused?
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  20. Pastaman

    Pastaman Been here awhile

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    Easy to try! Thanks