Northeastern Minnesota

Discussion in 'Central – From Da Nort Woods to the Plane States' started by arrowhead rider, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. c-zulu

    c-zulu Works with Turds

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    “For some reason, the section in Cook County has received substantial push-back for establishment.“

    :topes:baldy
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  2. Tiger993

    Tiger993 Been here awhile

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    I've been looking at the route draft they published, and it's 634 miles from one end to the other. It appears to be mostly gravel roads, and presumably you could cover distance at a good pace so I think you're right - two days hauling ass looks pretty doable. The ending/starting point in St. Vincent, MN is a long way from home, though.

    I'd be more inclined to jump on the route at Bemidji and head east towards Grand Marais, and then turn around and go back. That would be a fantastic fall ride.
  3. dtysdalx2

    dtysdalx2 Just send it!

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    Sure would be a nice place to be right about now. :knary

    Damn steam bath down here for a few days.
  4. MikeS

    MikeS Fur shur! Vamos! Supporter

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    I've heard about this "abomination" several times in Cook County. It's a bummer. There is a significant population here now, who don't like ATV's, snowmobiles, and other types of motorized travel. The irony of it all is those of us using the trails never see hikers or mountain bikers on the trails. All the roads on the route have a solid base. They were built as logging roads for loaded trucks.

    In all my riding on back trails in Cook County, I've mostly seen ATV riders during hunting season, and mountain bikers maybe a total of 6 times in all my years of riding (except during/prior to the 99er race). We do see ATV riders a few times in the summer, mostly near the Tom Lake area and on the Reservation.

    The issue in Cook County is one of ignorance, that those complaining don't use the trails and only imagine problems and issues. But on this forum, I'm preaching to the choir...
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  5. Lutz

    Lutz Fuzzy Rabbit

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    Hallelujah.
  6. MikeS

    MikeS Fur shur! Vamos! Supporter

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    You'll end up a hood ornament on a pickup or logging truck if you haul ass from Cook County to the Crane Lake area. It's a day from the Cook County/Canada border to Ely, and you aren't stopping for anything but gas. What a waste of a trip through beautiful country. Stay at home if that's your idea of back road travel. It won't become "too easy" or "too popular". "Too popular" is exactly what Cook County pundits are worried about, with people traveling at unsafe speeds. Your "haul ass" approach to the trail system is the reason for their opposition. Even the loggers and others who use those roads regularly do not like speeding motorcyclists or ATV riders. I hate meeting vehicles going at speeds where they loose control and/or we almost crash.

    A couple years back I met a rider going too fast as I drove my pickup on the Honeymoon Trail. He was on my side of the curve. I don't know if he ended up in the woods or managed to stay on the road after we missed. I in fact didn't care at that point, because he was riding so foolishly. I'm also aware of two other incidents where riders ended up in the woods, because they met a vehicle when they were going too fast around a curve. Another one, a pickup driver who always drove too fast, who eventually hit a logging truck head on in a curve. I have experienced and know of many more incidents like this. Be warned!
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  7. bernuski

    bernuski Adventurer

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    I agree completely with MikeS. As a former forester for both the paper company that owned most the private land up there and then as an assistant Ranger out of both Tofte and Grand Marais, the biggest health concern to those of us who used the road system daily was the rider (sled/ATV/MC) hauling ass trying to make it from Point A to Point B and back in a day. I did have the unfortunate experience of crushing one sled on a corner on a forest road (rider bailed before HE hit my truck) and my truck hitting the ditches a number of times avoiding people "Hauling Ass". There is absolutely no reason to haul ass on these roads, because if you do, you miss seeing the critters (another reason not to ride WOT), the scenery, the smells of the woods and just the joy of not being in any hurry. Plus, hauling ass = excessive dust. And nothing torques off landowners along dirt roads more than dust from the road getting into their house/cabin/camper/tent/yurt. I could preach about noise as well but Mark from BigDog Adventures says it best: "Loud pipes lose Trails". http://bigdogadventures.com/

    Ride responsibly like you LIVE on that dirt road by taking your time and not acting like an alcohol fueled "612'er or 651'er" up for the weekend giving 'er hell.

    Greg (former 612'er)
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  8. Lutz

    Lutz Fuzzy Rabbit

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    To add a little more perspective to Mike & Greg's comments. I broke out the quotes above as the key messages. I'm just as apt to ride "fast" as anyone...but it's got to be in a good frame of context. I don't think anyone was talking about running race-pace across the state necessarily...more so riding at a good, continual clip with the destination in mind. (Although I think 2 days would be race-pace. Looking at that route from a high level, 3-4 long days seems more realistic for someone that is doing it just for the ride more than the scenery.) I'm also one, who thinks one would waste a lot of opportunity if he just blasts through without checking things out along the way.

    But yes, it's definitely dangerous to absolutely let 'er rip on many of these roads - even when you're familiar with them - but especially when you're not. Far too many people seem to think that just because they're deep in the north woods that there's nobody else out there, and they can treat two way, winding roads like one-way race tracks without lanes or traffic considerations. Nothing could be further from the truth. It doesn't matter where you are up here...there's always somebody else there, either in your path or within eyesight or earshot. And some of the most fun roads that one could really fly on were they closed-courses, are not wide enough for a truck and a motorcycle at the same time...I mean literally: somebody needs to hit the ditch to pass. I've personally met trucks at such locations many times. I've come up on vehicles parked in the middle of the road on blind corners too. And don't forget about whitetail deer. ...Decreasing radius, marble-covered, off-camber corners. ...Downed trees.

    Then there's the respect for people who live there, or who might just be there working or recreating. I'm one of those who lives on a dirt road up here, and I get pissed when people people are oblivious and disrespectful to the world around them (my world). Noise, dust, damage to the road surface, danger to my kids...these are all very real things that I experience every single day. I love motorized recreation...so for these things to strike such a nerve in me, imagine what it's like for those who are ambivalent towards motorized recreation, or even anti-motorized. RESPECT.

    So my version: Come, enjoy the roads, they're all here right now. But keep your head on straight.
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  9. Tiger993

    Tiger993 Been here awhile

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    @bernuski, don't forget about those crazyass "763'ers" like me. Of course, the fact that I don't drink alcohol doesn't quite match the profile, and I don't seem to have enough time available for ripping up the North Shore hooligan-style, what with my job and family all requiring me to act like a responsible adult, husband and father.

    :fpalm

    Whoever said "hauling ass" means riding on, or past, the edge of control as has been stated here? It's a figure of speech folks, that was made in reference to riding a cross-state route of more than 600 miles. No one advocated law breaking, crashing, running other motorists into ditches, or even scaring the local wildlife with a loud muffler, yet that is the conclusion that was immediately drawn.

    Edit: @Lutz I think your post above is excellent.
  10. MikeS

    MikeS Fur shur! Vamos! Supporter

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    I don't want to make this in to a flame war. I want to educate:

    "Hauling ass" as defined in dictionaries: "moving much faster than the normal pace". It doesn't mean covering a long distance. The two posts above, assuming they used hauling ass as a "figure of speech", included the idea of covering this trail system of 600 miles in two days. Hauling ass (definition or figure of speech) for 600 miles in two days on these roads is unsafe in my opinion, and is not a welcome use from the perspective of both the opponents and the advocates of the trail system. On a gravel road, "hauling ass" (definition) is very dangerous and reckless in a majority of conditions on Cook County and Lake County trails.

    The local ATV club is big on promoting safe speeds on trails, and for good reason. Members live here, and they want the trails to be supported by locals of all biases, remain open, and expand. Hauling ass (definition) will change that to the worse.

    End of the rational side, now, just as important, the psychological and emotional part:

    Personal experience with foolishness brings up my ire. Folks from urban settings or more open country need to learn from northerners experience. Listen to what is being said here: The list of incidents several of us mentioned above are only part of it. We who live on these roads experience foolishness regularly. We get tired of it. Those of us in EMS and S & R get more tired of it. Dealing with serious injuries and foolishness results in psychological trauma to those of us responding to the incident. We northerners are the ones responding to the foolishness. Hauling ass (definition) is foolish.

    My list of close calls gets even worse, a close call with a fast moving snowmobiler that would have resulted in death to the snowmobiler except for fast maneuvering of my truck and luck. Imagine my 3 year old daughter, a passenger in my truck, what she would have experienced as life changing trauma to witnessing a fatal outcome instead of that near miss? Imagine my choice; do I tend to the psychological trauma to my young daughter who I love, or to the medical emergency of the foolish snowmobiler who probably had no chance to survive? This incident from over 30 years ago will continue to haunt me for the rest of my life.

    I personally know another person who had a fast moving snowmobiler loose control and get pinned under her truck, and the snowmobiler died from his injuries. That death was life changing for the driver's psyche, and not positive.

    Those are the incidents that we northerners all experience on a periodic and regular basis, summer recreation vehicles and winter recreation vehicles. They are sources of life changing trauma for those who were in the bigger vehicle. Death or serious life changing injury to the smaller vehicle rider. How many near misses does one experience before tragedy? I keep hoping it is a whole lot.

    Back to rational: When riding my moto, I keep hoping I don't get hit by a fast moving motorcyclist meeting me on a trail. Every time I'm out, I ride with that thought as a component of my many decisions. Yes, absolutely true!
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  11. bernuski

    bernuski Adventurer

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    The first stone I am throwing is at me. I grew up in Brooklyn Center in the mid seventies and most weekends were spent in Babbitt where my relatives live. Spent many of those Saturdays on the TS100 like it was my last weekend. Yeah, I have it heck trying to stay up with cousins and uncles. The difference being they knew the route from Happy Wanderer to Knotted Pine by memory and knew where their dads we cutting timber. I did not but WOT was how I kept up. So I am guilty in this respect. Fast forward 30 Years and the sport has changed. Better bikes, more leisure time and more forest users equals more chances for trouble. This is the scenario I manage on the Soo Line Trail and in the Soo Pits. The local clubs and I do our part to educate that EXPERIENCE comes with time. Learn your machine, learn the trails and always look down the trail, not at your front tire and be respectful of the trail.
  12. bernuski

    bernuski Adventurer

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    Sorry to rant. It’s hot, I am moving my kid from Loring Park to St Louis Park tomorrow and I have a three hour drive to a G&T in Anoka! I just want all riders to be safe and smart so we don’t lose areas to ride.
  13. bidda444

    bidda444 Been here awhile

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    Good judgement comes from experience; and experience comes from bad judgement :hmmmmm
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  14. Tiger993

    Tiger993 Been here awhile

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    Oh well. I suppose it wouldn't be an online forum if someone wasn't quoting [urban] dictionary definitions.

    Please continue my education: what speed, exactly, is "faster than the normal pace?" You have chosen to reject the idea that the phrase "hauling ass" could possibly be used as a figure of speech with no reckless behavior associated with it, so please explain with specificity what the "normal pace" is. I'm all ears :ear

    :fpalm
    :fpalm

    I could be mistaken, but your post reads very condescendingly and you seem to have an animus towards those of us who are not fortunate enough to live up north. Disappointing.

    But no worries, I've been traveling up there for 20 years to hike, bike, fish, sail, camp, etc. and will continue to do so. Believe it or not, I've actually managed to avoid running anyone else off the road during that time, so you should be safe when I'm in town.
    seanpaulpizza and MnFlyingFinn like this.
  15. dtysdalx2

    dtysdalx2 Just send it!

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    WAS thinking of riding up there today but Motel 6 Duluth price gouges ($110 for tonight) and Grand M campground is full. Ug. :(
  16. Lutz

    Lutz Fuzzy Rabbit

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    Get off the beaten path, away from Hwy 61. Check in Finland... Wildhurst. Our Place. State campground in Finland, or other camgrounds at a variety of inland lakes.
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  17. LeMaitre

    LeMaitre Been here awhile Supporter

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    Gravel Forest Service or County roads can range from 20-45mph depending on conditions and posted limits. Two tracks depends on which rut you want to follow into the ditch or woods.

    -Mark
  18. 3shot

    3shot Long timer

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    Mariner motel in silverbay, just ask if any rooms available.... the owner is a character.... hes akin to the soup nazi, but really a nice guy just dont argue with him.
  19. Evil Santa

    Evil Santa Been here awhile

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    I've always ridden fast on 2 wheels no matter if its street or dirt. I'm 65 years old and I will continue to ride fast....
  20. bernuski

    bernuski Adventurer

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