Note to self:

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by coppertop, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. mantree

    mantree Long timer

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    I buy athletic socks (poly spandex mix) I just match them when I fold my laundry.
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  2. MapMaster

    MapMaster Human Compass

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    Note to self:
    While cleaning a chain prior to reinstalling it with the swingarm that was removed, and the thought occurs to you that you need to keep it oriented in the same rotation as before. Keep that thought in mind when you actually do put back on the bike.
    :baldy

    Glad I always keep an extra master link on hand.

    Further note to self:
    Get another master link soon.
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  3. bimmergib

    bimmergib Adventurer

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    Not to self:
    Attach the short ends of your new pair of Rok straps on the exhaust side so the long end doesnt drop onto said exhaust when unbuckled thus neccessitating purchase of a new pair of Rok straps. Also always rebuckle your new pair of Rok straps right after unloading so you dont forget that they're still dangling over the chain when you ride down to the camp store thus neccessitating purchase of a new pair of Rok straps. Yes, probably need to buy stock in Rok straps.
  4. MikeyT

    MikeyT Krusty Olde Pharte

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    That's just one of the things I like about shafties.
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  5. DirtMerchant

    DirtMerchant Long timer

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    So, if someone took their chain off and didn't think to mark it, is there a reliable way to determine the original directional orientation? Asking for a friend.... :fpalm
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  6. MapMaster

    MapMaster Human Compass

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    If it's not the original chain, the master link will be the indicator. Either the clip, or riveted ends will be on the outside.
    If it's an OEM chain, if only one side of the links are stamped with a size or manufacturer's mark, then that would most likely be the outside of the chain. If it's marked on both sides, then you're probably SOL. Maybe by trying one way and then the other it will roll around the sprockets more smoothly when in the original orientation, but that's pure speculation on my part.
  7. MapMaster

    MapMaster Human Compass

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  8. goD giB

    goD giB Been here awhile

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    One side of the chain will be more "polished". Either top or the bottom side. That is the inside. Direction might be obvious from the inside because the front of the roller should have more wear than the back roller of each pair when looking at the inside of the bottom run where you would apply the lube.

    I have heard of people switching direction and turning the chain out to get more even wear from the chain.
    But I have my doubts, based on generally if I had to break the chain in the first place it is going to cost me less in the long run to just swap out the chain and sprockets.


    Also most chains I have fit to a bike only have stampings faced one way. Just because of how it looks I normally orient these to be correct on the bottom row. I have noticed most mechanics do the same but bulk chain (and other brands I don't normally buy )is normaly stamped every second link the other way.
    I only do this because it looks nicer in photos
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  9. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    Master links are the devil. Get a chain tool and stack the last link after you measure it and cut it to length. Same with bicycles.
    A chain tool is cheap and can save lots of headaches.
    longwaypyder likes this.
  10. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    All: Hmmmm? 50+yrs of foolin' w/ chains including swapping rotation and turning the sides in an effort to get chains to last longer etc has never improved or worsened chain life for me. I don't see as it matters. Anybody got better info, post it up?
    fran
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  11. MapMaster

    MapMaster Human Compass

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    Only 40 years of chain foolery for me. A few data points:
    I changed the front sprocket orientation on a chain that already had a lot of miles on it. The chain was toast in another 2000 but the degradation rate was noticeably faster. So changing orientation on an already bedded in chain is something I will try to avoid. That and the fact that I had a clip style master link was the reason I wanted to keep the original orientation when I did the re-install that was the source of my note-to-self.

    The best way to prolong chain life is with an oiler, cause we all lapse to one degree or another on lubrication upkeep.
    I put a Scott oiler on and got 52,000 miles from a high end DVD X-ring chain and OEM sprocket combo on my VFR.
    I've gotten 40K out of a couple more sets for the VFR since. I went one step down on the chain rating/model for those 2 times because the differential on the price of their top rated chain had gotten extreme.

    What will take out a chain rapidly is cheap replacement sprockets, so I avoid chain/sprocket combo sets. I did that twice on VFR (second time under way on an Alaska trip and options were limited) Only about 10-12k on both. The chain may be good quality, but the sprockets I got with them were crap. I'll stick with OEM sprockets when possible.

    Another thing that will wear a chain out faster are sprocket combos with a common multiplication factor between the front and rear (like 16/50, or even worse 15/45). This is because if there is a kink/flaw/ding in any particular link or tooth, the wear from that is not distributed over ALL of the links, so the wear is uneven. An 03 SV650 had the 15/45 sprocket combo and the setup was toast in 12k. The Triumph Tiger 800 had a 16/50 and even with my oiler installed on it, I only got 25k on the OEM setup. I'm running a 49 tooth rear on it now and will see how that goes.

    YRMV
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  12. Barron

    Barron M0DAH0LIC Supporter

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    When using a sanding drum in your dremel to shape some kydex, be prepared for a huge mess. The stuff comes off like fine dirt and will make your arms look like you were planting a tree. It will also bounce all over the place, to include off your cheek under your safety glasses and into your eye. The stuff will also fall off of your face and into your eye after you have removed and/or while removing said safety glasses. It's now my second least favorite material to work with. Working with carbon fiber is worse only because it will embed in your skin and conduct electricity which can short out your equipment or electrocute you. The results are often worth the hassle though.

    -Barron
  13. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Leg Humper

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    what is
    stacking" the last link? I have never changed a chain yet myself, but I do have a Motion Pro chain tool for when I have to change them on the Groms
  14. MapMaster

    MapMaster Human Compass

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    I think he meant staking it.
    Another term used for flaring the rivets of a master link (as opposed to a clip type), which the Motion Pro will do.
    A Vernier caliper is a nice tool to have to measure both the width of the master link after you've pressed the side plate on, and the deformity of the pins when you stake them.
  15. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Leg Humper

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    As it happens I do have a digital caliper, so that bit of information is good to know
  16. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

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    Yes i meant flaring it, stacking it, whatever the tool does to properly finish the link so it doesnt come off. A master link with a clip.might be good for an emergency but it is not a solid job.
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  17. mike in idaho

    mike in idaho Been here awhile

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    That's good to know, I've been riding motorcycles with master link clips for the last five decades(never had one fail) and I never realised how much danger I was in.
  18. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Leg Humper

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    With a SOLID 8.5 HP & 8 ft lbs of torque, I will make sure that I am extra careful :-)
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  19. MikeyT

    MikeyT Krusty Olde Pharte

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    A friend borrowed my clip years ago, and didn't tell me. I got lucky and the bike spit the chain out on the ground. Lucky twice, 'cause I had a spare lnk in my pocket. :clap
  20. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Leg Humper

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    Note to self: do NOT place your hand on the very hot exhaust :becca of the sod cutter you were just using as a brace when cleaning the feckin thing :baldy