Now vs Later

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Academy, Feb 3, 2017.

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Are you more likely to plan ahead or "sell up"?

  1. Sell up

    9 vote(s)
    42.9%
  2. plan for the future

    12 vote(s)
    57.1%
  1. willys

    willys Long timer

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    I know a woman who did the same thing, was diagonosed with stage 4 breast cancer etc, did all the things required and beat it, she also has this live life as it was your last week almost but still has restrictions so to speak as in responcibilities, she is seperated with no children basically capable of going anythwere she wants....but still she doesn't risk it all knowing that she could last well into the future, so selling up and doing exactly what we are discussing isn't the right thing to do.....if you understand what I'm saying ....for her or would be for me. OK, you get the horrific news like you did....you beat it, fantastic....you sell it all and use that funds to do whatever it is you have always wanted to do....but you still live for decades afterwards....but you have spent all or most of your funds..now what? Yes i know it sounds way too cautious and timid...but it happens , so how do you survive those later in life years? In a hole in the wall sitting there in a one room apartment reliving all the adventures....or do you keep all your stuff, wealth and carefully go on far less expensive adventures every year and scale back the almighty single adventure we are mentioning?
    That would be my way.....OR simply writing everyone off and buying a camper van with a bike hauler and going down to a 250cc very lightweight bike and simply living in it....as a hermit type person....driving from food bank to food back begging for food etc. That imho is a far better thing than sitting in a one bedroom apt reliving the big one, also almost pennyless...
    #21
  2. Parcero

    Parcero Mundial Supporter

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    I stage my adventures, going for about ten days to two or more weeks, leaving the bike, and returning later to continue to adventure. I have all of the normal "tie downs," but there isn't anything that can't be put off for a week or two--whether they are family or business obligations. Live life now.
    #22
    Academy likes this.
  3. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    We rented a car (right hand drive, manual transmission Ford diesel sedan), and my wife and I alternated days as designated driver. Driver only takes a tiny sip of their free sample so they don't miss out entirely, and gives the rest to the designated taster. The taster catches a heck of a buzz!

    It was epic.
    #23
  4. Boricua

    Boricua Long timer

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    Alternate hangover days. Its been a while for me. I use to work in the largest rum distillery on the world. It was an awesome job.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
    #24
  5. NicorAdv

    NicorAdv Been here awhile

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    Everything I buy (except if related to bike, camping, exploring) is one more item that seems to tie me down to a single spot.
    I don't like that one bit. Have collected too much 'junk' now that if the urge hits me, i'll just sell it real cheap, give it away or trash it, no matter what I paid for it.
    Done it before will do it again.
    #25
  6. Skootz Kabootz

    Skootz Kabootz Been here awhile

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    I think it is very educating to read the variety of different considerations and motivations we all have. Each one very valid. Probably it is fair to say for all of us, our priorities and circumstance have changed over the years. No doubt they will continue change too. And we have to do what for us is best.

    If I had a wife and children it goes without saying they would be my highest priority. As it stands however I don't, and like all of us I am faced with a declining number of years in which these kinds of extended trips are a physical possibility — what today sounds like a fun few weeks of riding and camping may, in a few years, seem a bit much.

    Another of my key motivators has been that in recent years I've lost a few close friends to sudden death or illness, seen others battle life threatening illness and win, while others in the latter stages of life are gradually losing their health and becoming less and less able to do any kind of travel. So that my days are numbered has really been impressed on me.

    Also, in my own family there is a history of Alzheimer's, so I have to proceed through life figuring that at some point in time my turn for this will come. If not, well that will be a bonus, but to my mind it live is now or never.

    Weighing the pros and cons of going vs waiting is constant. Interestingly, one thing I've learned through the process is that a certain amount of having faith in oneself is involved — do I have faith in myself and my ability to continue supporting a comfortable life in the years ahead as I have somehow managed to do in years past? As that is my one big question mark I am working on putting the machinery in place to answer it with a confident yes.

    Beyond all this, the one big thing that has led me to say yes to this whole dream of a 30-40 day trip, was this...

    Looking back at myself from 10 or 20 years in the future, which would I value more — that I stayed home and kept my $5000 invested, or that I used it to live my dream?

    We will never be younger than we are right now. I'm choosing to take the leap of faith.
    #26
  7. oldgrizz

    oldgrizz Long timer

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    Back in the stone age a buddy and I left the frozen north with 3 weeks holidays and 1 destination. SOUTH....we got into Washington and my Yamaha burnt a hole in a piston so we lost 2 days getting that fixed. Then we headed south on I 5 till somewhere in California. Then we tossed a coin to decide if we should take the coast highway home or head east. The coast won so that's what we did. We never made reservations we stopped when we were tired and we hit heavy rain for 3 days. Then when we got to Vancouver we again tossed a coin to see if we should go to Vancouver Island or head home on hwy 97. The island won. It was a great holiday

    Sent from my SM-N920W8 using Tapatalk
    #27
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  8. Academy

    Academy Been here awhile

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    This strikes me as a great solution for me personally. I am looking forward to adventures but am not entirely ready to sell up" Thanks for your post!
    #28
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  9. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    I agree. If you can afford to store your bike and do air fare, but can't get long stretches off, that seems like an awesome way to make a long ride.
    #29
    Parcero likes this.
  10. Switchglide12

    Switchglide12 Long timer

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    I take adventure over lot of things. My parents always told us, we only live once in this world. I have wife and 2 beautiful kids and hefty mortgage, yet every year I take trip with the bike. Every year we take 2-3 weeks family vacation just like most people. My wife and I pick location and pack the car we go. Packing also includes hitching up the uHaul trailer with the bike on it. When we get to our final destination, I get few hours everyday for myself, to ride around. I am an early riser, by the time wife and kids are up, I put on 50 to 100 miles on the bike, then rest of the day is family time. I also take 1 week trip by myself every year on the bike. I camp just to keep the cost down but not on family trip.
    #30
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  11. portablevcb

    portablevcb Long timer

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    It really depends on your family status. Wife and kids? They come first. We married early and had kids in our early 20's, planned that way. Why? Cause we wanted to be younger as we raised them and younger when the nest was empty. It also meant that we put off many of our 'dreams' til the kids were gone.

    Now am retired and no kids. What did we do? Sold or gave it all away, bought an RV and we are on the road. Yep, had to live to be 60 to do this but we did. Also had to work for 40 yrs to get the pensions that make the lifestyle possible.

    If no wife, kids or other family obligations then do what you want. But, what do you really want? Do you want a career in your field or do you want to be out on the road/trail? If you want to be out, can you afford it? Many people can go out and live on very little, as in a couple hundred a month. Do you have that much money stashed away or can you make that much while out on the road?

    If you want a career in your field the clock is ticking if you want to remain current. Getting older and not being in the workplace means getting a job later is much more difficult. Heck, even some construction work is age dependent. Older with no experience is not good.

    So, decide what you really want and figure out how to do it.
    #31
  12. willys

    willys Long timer

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    OK, what sort of adventure do most of us want? Is it a few weeks a month or a few months.....or is it years?

    I bet if we really sat down and thought long and hard about it, we'd still choose weeks maybe months over years.....so that length of time is savable, not one you would need to sell it all for. imho. But maybe i'm lucky enough to be able to scrape enough together between each summer to afford these 4-5 week trips? I don't know? I do not work so to speak but do fix bikes for those who need help at half the price of what the shops charge which helps both my customers and myself. So for a month's trip I will spend $3000 in gas, food, campsites etc etc etc.....it adds up fast when you get going.Sure you could do it for far less but I'm not sleeping in a ditch, been there done that....lol...just to save a few hundred over the length of the trip. I do sleep in a tent every night. I do not go to any expensive resturant etc simply burger joints or chip trucks for a simple
    meal each day. No booze. I may buy the wife a present while far away just because if something catches my eye.
    So, those sorts of expences don't require selling it all or changing your life much at all. Maybe not having 3 cups of coffee a day at Star bucks etc and drinking crappy coffee instead...lol....you'd be surprised how much that sort of savings adds up!...No movies, few dinners out, you know, typical expenditures possibly not needed as much as you think they do?

    Just a thought is all.....
    #32
  13. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I try to do a little of both. Wife and kids involved I plan, but I like weekend trips solo, or take one of the kids and I wing it.

    Find water, camp, fish, fire, and drink.
    #33
  14. Academy

    Academy Been here awhile

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    Thats everyone for your thoughts, I enjoyed hearing the different perspectives....Ride Safe and Cheers!
    #34
  15. PittsDriver

    PittsDriver Fuse lit.... Supporter

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    To quote Forrest Gump, "I guess it's a little of both."

    I'm definitely in the camp of believing that tomorrow is not a sure thing for any of us. I've lost dear friends in the 40's and one of my closest friends and epic ride buds has an inoperable aneurism where he's going to be perfectly fine until he drops without ever knowing what happened to him. We use this knowledge as a gift to leave nothing undone or unsaid. We are all high achievers with responsibilities (business owners, parents, volunteer jobs, and have large families spread all over the place) and yet we commit ourselves to an annual epic adventure. Over the past 6 years we've done the PCH, coast to coast rides, Nova Scotia, the TAT, and last year we created our own TAT-like, mostly off-road adventure from Maggie Valley NC to the baseball Hall of Fame in NY. We're gone anywhere from 9 days to 3 weeks every year.

    Everything in life is choice that reflects your priorities. Make your choices and have no regrets whether it's raising a family, running your own business, or spending your life in the service of others. But you don't have to chuck it all to have both a life of responsibilities and adventure.
    #35
  16. willys

    willys Long timer

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    Well Said......
    #36
  17. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    One day often means never.
    #37
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  18. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Gotta use some imagination man.

    I think you can ride in the am and noon time, find a real close hotel/room, take an afternoon distillery tour/tasting and repeat another the next day. I'm sure there are cabs to and from if need be.

    Not like you're going be driving in a car to multiple ones per day completely hammered after the last one and then get to your hotel.

    I love the concept!
    #38
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  19. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    I obviuos you've never taken a big life altering trip nor will you.

    After those 5 years (or whatever) of traveling you CHANGE. You give up the need to rebuild "stuff" as you realize that stuff is just wasted future travel potential.
    Your mind and thus priorities shift.

    I was there and then moved to Mexico for a year. Coming back to US I watched how people bought "stuff" (I call it crap) to fulfill some hole in their life. We buy used if needed and watch our $ outflow and travel all the time when we can now. We aim for 2 months of travel per year with a goal of taking off again in 6 years.

    Stuff does not fill the well...Travel does!
    #39
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  20. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    This is a great thread as I hear sooo many people say later or one day. I challenge them by responding with sorry that will probably be never just to see the reaction.
    #40