NWT, AB, BC two weeks at a time

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by squonker, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    A new job has given me enviable position of having two weeks off each month, and what better way to spend my time off during the summer than riding? Living in Yellowknife I have to ride two days to either Edmonton or Whitehorse before a trip even really begins (in my opinion), and that makes it hard to achieve much in a week off. This new job also pays better than my last one so I am now able to ride for two weeks, park the bike, fly back to work, fly back to the bike and ride for two more weeks before parking up again. And they say that life is tough. I don't believe it :D.

    So I just arrived back at camp having done my first stint on the bike and the plan is post up the RR two weeks worth at a time while I'm at work. The ride will last all summer but at some point I'm going to have to concede to the weather and head north while I still can, i.e. before the snow flies, but I'll deal with that when the time comes.

    For now, he's a preview of what the first two weeks has to offer...

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    Not bad for two weeks on the road! I'll continue (with proper pics) tomorrow...
    #1
  2. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

    Joined:
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    I left my home in Yellowknife on Monday June 4th. I had intended to do so at around 10am but only woke up at 9am, and it was 2pm by the time I actually put the bike in gear. Pretty sad, really! It wasn't the nicest day, not particularly warm (10c or so), and with a strong wind that I had to lean the bike into. It wasn't a whole lot of fun that first day, but I may have already made up my mind subconsciously that that would be the case, because the road out of Yellowknife barely has a corner in it for the first 300km and frankly bores the pants off me. Which could have added to the feeling of being cold, come to think of it. (No pants, that is :D)

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    And that's a twisty section! Here:

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    300km gets you to Fort Providence, but that's cutting it pretty close on a tank of gas on a Vee 2. I have done that stretch without filling up - once - but by the time I get 100km out of town the computer invariably says that I don't have the range to get the rest of the way, so I make a 10km detour into Rae for fuel and the peace of mind that comes with it.

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    I did pass a lot of bison on the road and on the side of it, but didn't stop for any pictures. Been there, done that (and in fact the closest I've come to hitting an animal on a bike was a bison on my KLR in Wood Buffalo National Park). Well, until a few days into this trip that was the case...

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    I finally made it to Fort Providence on the Mackenzie River, and despite initially having intended to ride a further 80km-ish to Kakisa and camp there, I'd had enough for one day. I was cold enough that I even stopped at the Snowshoe Inn in Providence to get a room. I walked into the lobby and immediately felt the heat - wonderful! - but they had no rooms left, so...

    ...Off to the campground it was. And even then only just, because there were only three spots left open there. I gather that most of the occupants were fisherman from Alberta. I'd say there was a 50% chance that it was going to rain that night, but there wasn't much I could do about it. I don't mind too much if it rains during the night, but trying to break camp in the rain isn't much fun. Time would tell.

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    Oh, and it was a staggering $39 for a camping spot!! In my opinion $20 is getting pretty pushy if all you want to do is set up a tent for the night, but the GNWT is charging almost double that now. Crazy.

    There were a few bugs around, but nothing compared to Providence standards really. It was almost a pleasant evening at times, with the sun poking though holes in the clouds.

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    I should warn you that I have a tendency to be rather (camera) trigger happy and also a little wordy in my Ride Reports. I had even made a point of bringing my DSLR with me on the trip, although as you'll see I am more than a little rusty with it. And I'll try to avoid great big long diatribes about nothing in particular. No promises, though!

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    I went for a walk on the path along the river and met a chap from Manning, AB called Jeff. Nice chap, he was up fishing for a few days with his daughters and we walked and talked for a while while he led me to an eagle's nest that he'd spotted from the river. I didn't have my camera with me at that time, but went back in the morning to snap a pic.

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    While discussing our respective journeys south, Jeff told me that on the way up he'd stopped at Enterprise, NWT and they had had no fuel. :doh This was worrying because the stretch from Enterprise to High Level, AB (along which there are no fuel stops), is also pushing what I can do on a tank of fuel. By way of explanation, YK to Fort Providence is 300km. Fort Providence to Enterprise is 140km. Enterprise to High Level is 275km, after which you're good for gas stations. With a range of around 300km I could do the 275km from Enterprise to High Level obviously, but if there was no fuel in Enterprise I'd have to detour into Hay River, NT, 40 km off the highway which would then necessitate my traveling 305km on a bike with a range of 300km! Realistically I can get 310km or 320km to a tank, but only at a stretch, and that was cutting it pretty close. Oh well, whatever happened that's what I was going to have to try to do the following day.
    #2
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  3. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    It didn't rain overnight, although it wasn't exactly warm. I guess when I packed I did so for the gorgeous weather I imagined I'd be riding in, not the so so weather I was actually having. I took a stroll to the eagles nest that Jeff had shown me the night before.

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    Breakfast was a lazy affair at the Big River service station in Fort Providence. I didn't feel any particular need to get going, I had plenty of time and it really didn't matter how far I made it - or didn't - that day. That said, I was planning on riding to High Level, AB, and had already booked a hotel there having seen the forecast. I had two cups of completely shite tea and a breakfast sandwich before I spotted the cinnamon buns. Now there's a good way to brighten up your morning. Mmmm, cinnamon buns!

    As I was getting suited up outside a couple of cops walked by and one of them told me that it had snowed in High Level two or three days ago. Bloody hell! I asked him about the gas situation at Lisa's Place in Enterprise bearing in mind what I'd been told the previous night, but he said that was news to him. This was definitely a day for Frogg Toggs, I was pretty certain that I'd be rained on that day. The temp that morning was 5c.

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    The Deh Cho Bridge across the Mackenzie River at Fort Providence.

    Between Providence and Enterprise I pulled in at my favourite pull out. You can see for miles and miles from here..and all you can see is the tops of trees.

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    There also happened to be a W900 parked there. I have long been of the opinion that the 'W9' is a beautiful piece of machinery. I dare you to disagree!

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    On pulling in to the gas station at Enterprise, sure enough there was a sign saying "Out Of Gas" on the first pump. On the second, however, no sign. Lisa requires you to leave a credit card or such inside before you pump, so I asked her about the sign and she responded with something along the lines of one pump being out of order. Not that it really matters, but there is a difference between out of order and out of gas. Thankfully pump #2 had both order and gas, so I filled up and rode away.

    Only to glance down at my range indicator and find that it was reading 280kms. The sign on the side of the road said that High Level (the next gas station) was 275kms, and that's too close for comfort for me. But it was odd because I had made a point of filling the tank to the brim, even putting the bike on the centre stand to do so, and usually that's going to give me a range of between 310km and 320km. I know now that that's the difference between the tank being full, and full to the tits. For some reason the first of those two levels gives you more range. According to the computer, at least. I actually thought that perhaps I could fit more in the tank and went back again for a whopping $1.35 worth of gas. Which made no difference to the stated range.

    Not far out of Enterprise are two sets of waterfalls. I believe the first set is called Louise Falls, but don't quote me on that. I stopped at my favourite of the two, Alexandra Falls.

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    There are rarely many people at the falls, and you can walk right down to the edge and sit and wonder. It's good for the soul.

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    The chaps at the edge in this shot give you some perspective.
    #3
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  4. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

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    Good stuff Ben, I'll check in once in a while to see where you get..
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  5. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Thanks David, and if I make it to your neck of the woods I'll call you.
    #5
  6. RedDogAlberta

    RedDogAlberta High Plains Drifter

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    Great stuff. Keep it coming.
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  7. Herr Magooro

    Herr Magooro Adventurer

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    Pretty nice work schedule you’ve got there, in my opinion. I’m guessing a lot of people in this forum are envious! Safe travels.

    Are those E-07s you’re running? If so, how do you like them? I ran them to and from AK a few years back and was impressed.

    So is riding to Yellowknife worth it? I was thinking of taking two weeks in August to ride there from Minnesota, down the Liard Highway and through parts of BC I haven’t seen before, but everything I’ve read suggests straight and boring roads. I’ve got a lifetime of those here.
    #7
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  8. BCBackRoads

    BCBackRoads Travels with Gumby

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    Great start. I'll be following along.

    Cheers, Wayne
    #8
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  9. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    HM, if you're going to come via Fort Liard then I'd say Yellowknife would be worth it. Coming up through High Level on the Mackenzie Highway you'd have to really like long, straight roads! If I can help at all, let me know.

    And yes, they're E-07 Dakars. First set I've ever tried, but I like them a great deal. Stay tuned to see how they coped with the mud I'm about to encounter...!
    #9
  10. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Thanks for the support, folks. :D

    Having crossed the Alberta border, the first sign of civilization you come to is Indian Cabins. Actually, Indian Cabins might have been civilization once upon a time, but it's all closed now. Be warned, the signs on the road still say that it's open, but it wasn't last summer and it wasn't now.

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    It's so lush compared to Yellowknife when you get down to Enterprise and beyond
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    But the roads are just as straight...
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    While wondering around what had once been the camp at Indian Cabins to stretch my legs I noticed these strange marks on some leaves.

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    I thought they were pretty cool.

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    The old camp


    . I considered taking off my Frogg Toggs at Indian Cabins as the sky appeared to be brightening. However I'd seen the forecast and decided that it might be prudent to leave them on for a while. That was a good call as it turned out because before I made it to High Level there were a few (short) periods of heavy rain.

    Just south of Indian Cabins I saw an adolescent black bear, and took exactly no photos of it.

    Eventually I pulled in to High Level, knackered, asked for a room on the ground floor of the hotel, brought my shit inside, got my riding gear off, went outside to lube the chain and...the heavens had well and truly opened. (It must have been raining cats and dogs because I stepped in a poodle).

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    I turned the fireplace on in my room and it was very, very cozy. I could have purred. Chatting with friends, one kindly offered me the use of his shop in Edmonton to change my oil on the weekend if I needed it (I did), and then I had supper and strolled to Timmies to feed my addiction to their steeped tea. There used to be rumours about Tims putting coke or something highly addictive in their drinks to keep people coming back. I couldn't care less if they put crack in it, I just want more. It turned out to be a fairly pleasant evening in the end, and on the walk back to the hotel I checked the price of premium at various garages in preparation for the morning.
    #10
  11. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    High Level:

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    The next morning when I woke up it was still raining, but there were patches of blue sky, too. The forecast didn't really lean one way or the other so I made the executive decision to say fuck it, and extend my hotel room for one more night. I was in no hurry, I'd do a day trip, the intent being to get to Rainbow Lake and then out towards Fort Vermillion to explore a little of that area.

    Until I bought a semi and began hauling from Edmonton to Yellowknife I was only aware of one practical road south from High Level, which takes you through Peace River, Valleyview and Whitecourt. You could go via Grand Prairie but it adds a few hours to the trip...and then I found out that truckers turn off in High Level and go towards Fort Vermillion and head south through Slave Lake and Red Earth. It cuts an hour off the journey - that's not insignificant to a trucker. Far less traffic, too.

    Anyway, whatever else happened I wanted to head south on the Slave Lake road. I had done it before but only in winter and only in the big rig, it seemed prettier than the 'regular' route so I was keen to explore it on the bike at a more leisurely pace. Valleyview is also a shit hole and I was keen to avoid it if possible.

    First things first. Breakfast, gas , and then the road to Rainbow Lake. Which doesn't appear to be any less straight than the road to Yellowknife.

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    I came across a turn-off signed to Chateh. I had never heard of Chateh (turns out that's because its English name is Assumption, but it is now known by it's native name), so I decided to check it out. Why not - it's an adventure, right?! And boy, was I about to get a surprise.

    The Chateh access road:

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    When I made it to the community I was astonished by how much mud there was. It was everywhere! Crazy deep mud, and not a paved road in sight. There were a few roads leading out of town beyond it, but I couldn't really explore because there were so few places that I could safely stop the bike, and gas was an issue, too (more about that later). When I did stop, the mud was greasy and slippery and generally...crazy. The people were friendly - I waved to passing cars and almost everyone returned my wave, smiled, nodded or gave me a thumbs up. But man, that mud - most of them were probably wondering what the hell I was doing there on a bike. Me too!

    I rode past the cemetery and noticed that it was full of what seemed like dog houses. I did find somewhere that I could stop nearby and was going to slide over there with my camera when I realized that it was full of people at some sort of service, so I left them to it. Here are the pics that I did take:

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    How would you even get up your driveway with out a 4X4?!

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    I was glad to have installed a front fender raising kit when I bought the bike

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    #11
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  12. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Herr Magooro, it was in Assumption/Chateh that my E-07 Dakars really shone. I am used to the Heidenau K60s, and I like them just fine but the bike did feel especially stable in the mud. I know it was the bike 'cos I can't ride for shit :muutt

    Gas was an issue again because from High Level to Rainbow Lake and back was basically going to be a tank of fuel with a little to spare. I had now used that spare detouring to Chateh, which I think was about 10kms off the highway. If there was gas in Rainbow Lake then no problem - and there very likely was - I just wasn't sure. There was probably gas in Assumption too, but I couldn't find it anywhere and the one part of town that I thought I might find it in was pretty much restricted by the even deeper mud on the part of road leading to it.

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    Rainbow Lake is 44km once you're back on the highway, and there was the usual informational sign as you approach town letting you know what services you'll find there.

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    There are three things missing from that sign as far as I'm concerned: hookers, blow, and gas. And the last one was going to be important, potentially. Thankfully I did find a gas station, but even that didn't look open with the digital price display sign not working.

    Rainbow Lake is an oil town and appears to have a distinctive residential side and a distinctive industrial part of town. It was very lush by the airport. There is even a Golf and Country Club.

    Having fuelled up I went to the grocery store for some lunch and stretched my legs while eating it in the parking lot. It rained again during lunch, there was both bright sunshine and dark clouds. Rainbow Lake was hit pretty hard when the oil patch tanked and it was pretty obvious looking at the place. It seemed to have everything that you'd need...and nothing that you'd want.

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    The grocery store was dire. In Yellowknife it's not unusual to find bare shelves, but I was hard pushed to find anything that you'd call quality food here. There was a liquor store which I bet does roaring trade!

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    #12
  13. Herr Magooro

    Herr Magooro Adventurer

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    You are braver than me with that kind of mud! I loved the E-07s for their versatility, but it was the Dalton mud where I had issues. Then again, I can't ride for shit either! In hindsight, nothing short of knobbies next time around for those slick conditions. I'm still considering using them or K60s if I do Yellowknife/Liard. I'm just not sure the new E-07 Plus will get the mileage like the Dakars did.
    #13
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  14. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    After eating I began to head back towards High Level, and quickly became distracted. According to a backroads book of Alberta that I have, it should be possible to ride off road from Zama to Rainbow Lake. I didn't see any indicators that one track leading off into the bush or another would be the one to take until I was a short distance out of town and saw this.

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    That seemed like a good start, so I pulled off the highway to check it out.

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    You can't really see it in the photo but in the distance there is something orange so I thought I'd ride that far anyway in the hope that it was an information sign. It wasn't.

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    It didn't look too bad from what I could see at the barrier, but I put this on my list for another ride. I haven't looked at the backroads book since I got back from this part of the ride actually, must try and remember to do so when I get home.

    I did see a small black bear at one point, and at Chinchaga Creek took a dirt track simply because it looked appealing. It took me through a fantastic bush camping area to the river, here.

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    There was a woman there walking her curious, but very shy, dog. When it finally plucked up the courage to come close enough to let me stroke it, it then wouldn't leave me alone and she had trouble getting it to obey her calls to go back to her.

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    I wanted to investigate this side-road-off-the-side-road. I walked a little way down it but didn't have my bear spray with me and turned back.

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    I think that this was the road down to Chinchaga Creek

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    I have no idea where this is...!


    A couple of shots from the ride back to High Level:

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    I stopped just outside town to visit an old boss of mine that I had always got along with, but hadn't seen for many years since he'd moved out of Yellowknife. We shot the shit for half an hour and agreed to meet for breakfast the following morning. As for tonight, though, I felt bad about the bike being so dirty after all that mud and figured that right now would be as a time as any to find a wand and wash it.

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    It was 6pm by now and had started to rain hard again, to boot. I abandoned any plans to explore further that day and parked at the hotel before showering and having supper. The one not particularly detailed map that I had with me suggested that you can ride through Chateh/Assumption to get to Zama which fitted with what I had seen that day, and an inmate friend in Grande Prairie tells me that you can ride from Rainbow Lake to Chateh off road, so it would seem that there are a couple of adventures to be had in the area yet. I was also to find out at breakfast the next morning that the road between Zama and Rainbow Lake was pretty rough, it's more of a winter road apparently. But does that mean that it can't be done in summer?
    #14
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  15. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    It was brighter the next morning, and after breakfast with my old boss I set off in the direction of Fort Vermillion, although by then the clouds were already rolling in. There were a couple of trucks from Vancouver Island Tree Services parked outside the hotel, they were a long way from home. Was there no-one closer that could put in a more competitive bid on a contract? Perhaps those closer knew better! Anyway, I had no real plan other than to do some exploring, and not ride south by my regular route. Lots of farmland out that way.

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    And they're still bush clearing to make more.

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    More straight roads, too!

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    I came to a junction where I could either turn off right to go towards Fort Vermillion, or go straight (on dirt) to John D' Or Prairie. I had never heard of John D' Or Prairie, but knew that was a native community, and at the end of the road. It was 69km away and I presumed that I'd be able to find gas there. Here's the junction where I pulled over to think about it. The road turns to dirt right there.

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    I pulled out a map. As usual I had left later in the day that I had intended to, I really wanted to explore but did I want to ride 140 kms to the end of the road and back in order to do so? A minivan pulled over with a native lady and her son in it. I walked over and she said, "So?" I told her I was just thinking...asked her how the road was and she hesitated. I asked her whether or not there there was gas in John D' Or Prairie and she said yes, and that I should ask a native to borrow their card because I'd pay less tax. She said that if they saw me there they'd help me out. That's way cool. :thumb So I set off.

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    Keep the rubber side down...

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    Really?

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    The road was ok, but it was a little...straight...and I was becoming a little fed up with straight. I rode approximately 20kms before deciding that there wasn't likely much to see there, it was later in the day than it should have been and anyway I could always come back. I pulled over to lose a layer now that it was warming up again, put on some lighter gloves, and turned around.

    I turned towards Fort Vermillion, stopping for a couple of quick pics and to check out a campground which was almost deserted.

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    Next stop: La Crete.


    #15
  16. eaglescan

    eaglescan Borrego rocks

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    Thanks for the report. I like your writing style, and the photos give us an idea of the landscape. I once flew into Yellowknife from Rankin, but did not realize the expanse of the land! Will be following , Steve ( eagleguy on DSBC )
    #16
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  17. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    Thanks Steve :beer
    #17
  18. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

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    I had always had in the back of mind the idea that I'd check out the La Crete ferry, and passing a sign to it decided that it was now or never. I had to make a pit stop in La Crete itself for lunch and fuel, and I thought that La Crete seemed like a half decent place. It rather reminded me of Grande Prairie, but on a smaller scale. It's a Mennonite community, or possibly Hudderite, or perhaps even Marmite or Vegemite but as far as we're concerned I don't think that it makes much difference.

    The ferry crossing is also known as Tompkins Landing and I made haste between La Crete and there. Heck, there were even a couple of corners! I could have sworn that I pulled over and took a photo of one, such a revelation it was, but I can't find that particular pic now.

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    There is a campground at the La Crete side of the river - worth remembering for the future.

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    I had the whole darned boat to myself, and chatted briefly with the deck hand who told me that it runs 24hrs/day. It is only a 5 or so minute crossing, but it saves a couple of hours for truckers heading to the lumber mills at La Crete. And it's free.

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    At first it appears to be a strange setup, with two pontoons and a deck placed perpendicular to them, but I saw why when the boat docked and the pontoons were pointed downstream as opposed to across it, which would have made it nigh impossible for the captain to keep it still for vehicles to load and unload. There is an engine on each pontoon.

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    The ferry dropped me off 16km from the highway, and there was nothing but bush that whole 16km. Not a sign of civilization anywhere. Once back on the highway you are 61km south of High Level and 138km North of Manning. I had planned to head north, back into High Level and then into Fort Vermillion itself, but I had also made plans to meet friends in Edmonton the following evening and would have been riding half the night to make that get together. So I turned south, and within a couple of kilometers had my closest animal encounter yet. A duck took off from the side of the road on the right, I never even saw it until it was headed for me and I swear that it only missed my front wheel by a couple of inches. Had they connected I'm sure I'd have gone down. At highway speeds. With a semi behind me.

    In the end I decided to ride to Peace River that day, but by Manning (with an hour yet to go) I was tired enough that I needed to stop. The campground in Manning is eight or so spots in a row with no obvious office. The big building beside it turned out to be an old folks home, and staff there said that the campground office was in the such and such building in town. Well I didn't know where the such and such building was and I wasn't going to spend any time looking for it, so I set up in an empty spot and waited for someone to come around and collect my money. Just as I had arrived, so too had a German family in their RV. The wife had come into the old folks home with me, thinking that it was the office also, and when I set up my tent they drove off...only to appear again 20 minutes later and park in the spot beside me. I asked her whether she'd gone to look for the office and she replied, "No, the liquor store". A woman after my own heart. It wasn't long after that that she told me she'd found a place to deposit money in a slot on the washroom/shower building. And now my conscience was clear, also.

    I went for a walk around town for a couple of hours and was impressed by the amenities that such a small town had - even a pool. I had a brief chat with a fellow sitting outside his fifth wheel camper in the sun (it was damn hot by now), and called it a night.

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    #18
    RevyRider, Shaggie, bobw and 2 others like this.
  19. squonker

    squonker Stupid is the new norm

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,838
    Location:
    Yellowknife and Norman Wells, NWT
    The following morning I was up at 6.15 and on the road at 7.30...in questionable weather. 15c. I have yet to go one day without being rained on - perhaps today will be the day. Mission #1: breakfast in Peace River. On the way there I explored Dixonville. Pretty small place, but it has a wee campground. Nothing to write home about, but nothing to turn your nose up at either and good for future reference. There were a couple of nice 70s Ford pick ups for sale on the side of the road, and that morning was also significant because I saw the very first bike of the entire trip.

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    You can't really see from this pic, but that is a big-arse tractor parked back there.

    I had a decision to make. I mentioned early on in this thread that I was very keen not to travel to Edmonton by the 'usual' route through Valleyview and Whitecourt. I've done that road hundreds of times and Valleyview is still a shithole. However, that route is exactly what I found myself doing now. I had the option of going via Grande Prairie and visiting my friend OldMedic there, but that was going to add a couple of hours to the trip and I had arranged to meet peeps in Edmonton that evening. I did however call inverted who lives just a few minutes from Peace River and see whether he was around for a coffee, but he was busy at work so...time to hit the road, Jack.

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    Look! A straight road!

    As you head out of Peace River you climb up a fairly dramatic hill, and at the top are signs to 'Twelve Foot Davis Gravesite". I had often wondered just what that was all about, so perhaps now was as good a time as any to take a gubbins. His gravesite is really cool, there are some awesome views from the top of the hill where he is buried. (They do, however, pale in comparison to his big brother Thirteen Foot Davis's resting place).

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    Not sure what this one is about!

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    Back on my way, I saw a sign for an alternative route to Edmonton. It may add some time to the trip but I needed to get off the road that I was on in a hurry before my brain melted. I turned onto Hwy 2A and ended up in Slave Lake, which is on the route that I had hoped to take all along. I'd been through there before but hadn't realized that the lake itself is so big. There are even resorts and marinas along it. There was a massive forest fire there several years ago, big enough that Prince William and Kate stopped in their on their honeymoon to see the devastation. I seem to recall that a significant part of the town was damaged.

    I stopped there for tea and, finding myself right beside a Canadian Tire also bought the oil I'd need for the following day's scheduled oil change in Edmonton. I also saw my second bike of the trip there, and then...about a dozen more in the space of a couple of minutes. No longer did I feel special!

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    Nice country around there, anyway. I don't have my map with me at camp so I can't tell you exactly where I went, but I noted that between Westlock and Hwy 16 there was a ton of construction. I'd slow down to the 50 kmh limit, come through the construction zone, speed back up to 100 kmh (or whatever the 'regular' speed limit was), and within a minute be slowing back down to 50 for the next construction zone. Grrrrr.

    And once on the outskirts of Edmonton I hit the Friday afternoon rush hour traffic on the Anthony Henday. Genius. It was hot too, 30c - just what you want when you're down to first gear. Not. I had excellent directions to Smurphville, home of inmate inmate Smurph, and where rob1313, mardaf and northernhooligan were waiting. I had time for a quick (and much needed) shower before we all headed out for a bite to eat, meeting Nighman and another friend Claude there. Back at Smurph's it was time for a couple of drinks and some suggestions for alternative routes to Airdrie for the next day (I had zero interest in riding Hwy 2) before I gratefully hit the sack, accompanied by one of Smurph's dogs, Gunner, who lay beside me all night :thumb

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    The eagle-eyed among you will have noticed that this is not a photo of Gunner.
    #19
  20. Pongo

    Pongo Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Oddometer:
    413
    Location:
    Victoria, BC Canada
    Great write up, must be that you are sort of a local cause the detail is great.
    #20
    squonker likes this.