Off-road Confidence

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Order_Unknown, Aug 29, 2020.

  1. PDXRider70

    PDXRider70 Adventurer

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    I did RawHyde back at the end of May. I rode 900 miles home with a broken rib, broken metacarpal, and a grade 2 MCL tear. I am still doing PT for the knee but today I finally got back out off tarmac. Would I do it again? In a heartbeat. The thing that jacked me up was not being able to come and instantly practice the skills I had learned.

    From my perspective any class you take is just going to give you a few skills to practice and build. Leaving the class I had a ton of confidence, not riding for the last few months, trashed that. I would HIGHLY suggest RawHyde and then just get out and do the things! And yes, better tires are in order. :)
    #21
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  2. Rick92040

    Rick92040 Been here awhile

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    I agree with the others about the Dunlop Mission tires. On dirt roads with the stock tires I felt like I was on slicks. With the Mission tires it was a 180 turnaround. They also handle great on the street.
    Another thing I did was I pulled the PRO Plug. When I get to the end of the pavement I stop and put it into Enduro mode, not Enduro Pro. I need all the help in the dirt the bike can give me. I'm no professional in the dirt.
    #22
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  3. Order_Unknown

    Order_Unknown Adventurer

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    Is there a difference between Enduro and Enduro Pro? I thought the only difference with Pro was that I could adjust the settings. But I thought that if I didn't adjust the settings they would be the same...
    #23
  4. Rick92040

    Rick92040 Been here awhile

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  5. Boxerbreath

    Boxerbreath 2017.5 GS Black Storm

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    Nothing is going to give you confidence more than riding a dirt bike.
    It transfers directly over. The only thing that changes is the weight and momentum.
    #25
  6. Order_Unknown

    Order_Unknown Adventurer

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    I just watched this detailed tire comparison of 80/20 and 50/50 tires, and was surprised that the stock tire that BMW puts on this bike came in dead last for this comparison. Why would BMW do that?

    #26
  7. Order_Unknown

    Order_Unknown Adventurer

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    #27
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  8. postoak2112

    postoak2112 Javalina

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    i agree with everything said here. i just did my first real adventure on rough pavement/gravel/dirt/dry river bed w/ "baby head" rocks. i've been practicing on much easier off-roads and i felt ready. standing is critical, and getting wider foot pegs made that much much better. sure, i ate it once in this loose soily crap but hey...i missed the cactus bush right next to it by a few inches...so i win. the bike took 0 damage and i took 0 damage. nothing beats actual riding experience.

    by the way, Continental TK70s with full air. they were amazing except for that silt.

    m.
    IMG_6988.jpeg
    #28
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  9. eri

    eri Been here awhile

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    k75mutant.JPG P9912346.jpg salt pan.JPG basically you need to get used to the fact that you are semi-floating on some surfaces and learn to 'read' the surface as to where the grip is, where it isn't, and on which bits you need to be on, depending on; corners, straights, gradient etc.

    it's a hell of a lot to learn and a beginner doesn't really have time to think about more than a couple of variables at once

    i rode around australia a couple of times on a road bike with road tyres and spent a LOT of time on gravel and sandy roads, it can be done, and the more you do it the easier it becomes

    the easiest thing for you to do is just ride more gravel roads, by yourself, at the your own speed

    the next easiest thing is to put some tyres on that have some knobs!, a TKC80 front and a TKC70 rear would be an expensive but excellent set of tyres for your bike and skill level

    while getting comfortable riding on gravel be careful about riding with people experienced riding fast on it....they make going round corners fast look SO EASY that you try to follow, mess up the line, get in rut or deep gravel, lose your confidence, slow down, straighten up, realise you won't make the corner, hit the brakes, go down, expensive bits everywhere...........

    so just get out there and ride nice dry roads with only a little gravel.....and start saving for something like the TKC tyres that work almost equally well on gravel or tar
    #29
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  10. multiphrenic

    multiphrenic Been here awhile Supporter

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    Are people riding on gravel and dirt on a 1250 finding it enjoyable or are they doing it because it’s just a part of the destination?

    It seems like such a lumbering beast, Ive yet to take it on dirt, mind you I also have cast wheels so my options are even more limited.

    If I had any more room (or money) I’d get a small bike to learn to play in the dirt. I signed up for a two day class with their KLXs to get more comfortable on dirt, and hoping that translates if I end up needing it.
    #30
  11. Order_Unknown

    Order_Unknown Adventurer

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    Well...for me, I live in Guatemala. I need a bike that performs great on road, because I will be on roads for the next several months. But then I'll ride down through Mexico and into Guatemala once they re-open the border to foreigners. The town I live in is all cobblestone streets. And exploring further out into smaller villages and rural lands I'll encounter every sort of roads. So for me, as you suggest, it's just part of the destination. That said, I know of guys who love their big adventure bikes off-road.
    #31
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  12. eri

    eri Been here awhile

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    are they the right tools for the job?..........no, not really and if i lived on a dirt road i'd have a dirt bike

    but the reality of living in a major city is i only get to ride on a dirt road 10-20? days a year:muutt

    and the big GS is really good on the other roads 330-340 days a year:clap
    #32
  13. NoiZboy

    NoiZboy Dirt to Track and Back Again

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    I go out in search of dirt and love it. It's not the same as being out on a 250 or 400, no, but it's way more fun than you'd think. The R1200 (which is what I have) carries it's weight really well, and the bike can do a lot more than you'd imagine. Just spent 2 weeks straight on it, and was mostly on dirt - anything from hardpack, to gravel, to switchbacks, to narrow tracks & rocky climbs/descents. I can't wait to do it again...lol.

    It's definitely not the same kind of riding as hitting trails or tracks with a true dirt bike, but it's amazing what you can do with these bikes.
    #33
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  14. eri

    eri Been here awhile

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    DSC_8132.JPG you don't need an adventure bike or even knobblies for roads like these

    but the high exhaust and knobblies are very useful the 20? times the road and stream come together DSC_7997.JPG

    and the big back seat and carrying capacity make it easier to bring along the chef/ masseuse
    #34
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  15. postoak2112

    postoak2112 Javalina

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    that sounds amazing! can you ride up to/around any Mayan ruins?

    m.
    #35
  16. canoeguy

    canoeguy Long timer

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    I am not the member you are quoting but I can answer that. Hell yes, you can. There were many times when I was the only person there. And unlike here most of the sites are pretty much open and you can climb and touch the pyramids(with respect and care of course). It was a monumental experience in my life to be honest.

    There are sites everywhere and many of the ones you have never heard of are magnificent. Often there is an older pensianado couple that rakes leaves and manages a little entry shack. They also keep an eye on your bike ;) For the equivalent of a couple dollars you are exploring amazing ruins way off the tourist path.
    #36
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  17. postoak2112

    postoak2112 Javalina

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    really???? looks like i found my goal for '21. i was in Belize a bunch of years ago and the ruins i saw were...as you said...monumental. i also did a cave trip that changed my life too. shall we plan a trip?

    m.
    #37
  18. canoeguy

    canoeguy Long timer

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    I have been in 19 countries which is not impressive compared to many but I am telling you Mexico is amazing in so many ways I can’t begin to do it justice. The ruins were the icing on the cake. Though there are sites I visited in Guatemala and Belize as well I just loved Mexico the most.

    my trip was almost six years ago. As for planning the next...November 2021.

    I am going all the way to Ushuaia this time. I have always regretted stopping in Panama.

    in fact I bought the bike for the trip this week...

    7C0D51F8-237D-4C4B-87D7-8B86743F2DAF.jpeg

    And now it is beginning to be prepped...

    D9EEC20E-7B1A-4FA6-8134-428C82AB7F09.jpeg
    #38
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  19. canoeguy

    canoeguy Long timer

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    Obviously one of the more famous ones.



    10329947_10151787853614364_1320547443838776955_o.jpg




    ETA: Sorry to derail the thread but hey it's an adventure, right?
    #39
  20. scottrnelson

    scottrnelson Mr. Dual Sport Rider

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    The last time I was in Guatemala, I visited Antigua. I remember a lot of motorcycles parked on the streets.

    A couple of years ago I was in the process of moving and didn't ride much for about a year before the move. I sold my KTM 990 Adv before moving, then bought a KTM 1090R after the move. Because I hadn't ridden much, especially off road, I had kind of lost my confidence in the dirt. I went on some fairly easy dirt roads nearby and couldn't wait to get back to the pavement. I didn't want to be on those roads. I recognized the issue and decided to do something about it.

    First, I rode my XR650L more in the dirt to get the feeling back, then started taking the bigger KTM on the same roads. After about six months of riding on that stuff at least once a week my confidence was back. Basically it took a lot of practice to get there and little by little going from fairly easy dirt roads to more difficult ones. The only places I still have issues are steep uphill rocky sections, but at least I know enough to recognize those and (usually) turn around before exceeding my skill level.
    #40