Oil drain plug stripped. Any tips?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Camas, Sep 24, 2006.

  1. OldRider 125

    OldRider 125 Been here awhile

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    This is a transmission drain plug kit you can get from Napa or most any other auto parts store. Tap the engine case out to 1/2X20, screw the large plug in and then drain the engine through the smaller plug in the center. This way your not taking the plug in & out of the engine case & stripping it again.
    #21
  2. Camas

    Camas Rooster Bastid

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    Thanks for the tips guys. I'll see if I can get both the rubber plug and the transmission drain plug kit. If one doesn't work out, the other one should.
    #22
  3. JP4

    JP4 Thumper Geek

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    #23
  4. Camas

    Camas Rooster Bastid

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    I should've taken and posted these earlier. Notice the "nipple" type of meat on the case. I think a tap might be best. What do you think?
    Here's a pic of the size and shape of what I'll be tapping.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #24
  5. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    I think there are some threads to be had in yonder case...:D
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  6. klrzorn

    klrzorn Been here awhile

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    Napa sells a product something like JB Weld that restores threads. It's an epoxy type product that you put on the cases, and a grease that you put on plug, that works as a release. They also have over size plugs that are self tappers. The expansion plug that was mentioned earlier probably isn't the best fix. It's too tall, and wont let the shavings , and nasty sludge bullshit drain out. I've installed them in all my trans. pans. They work great there, but when I drain the trans I always pull the pan to change the filter. I would bet the oversize self tapper plug will be your easiest fix.
    #26
  7. Camas

    Camas Rooster Bastid

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    Man I hope so. I think I'll go directly to Tacoma Screw. Napa seems to be hiring ex-Taco Bell workers who can barely ring up your order. Shades of Schucks.
    Looks like there's plenty of meat to retap don't you think?
    #27
  8. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    I would try that 1st anyway. Then dive deeper if you need to...
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  9. klrzorn

    klrzorn Been here awhile

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    absolutly. The self tapper will take care of this . I dont have the same experience at my local Napa. Two of the guys there have had their own shops. One of them I used to go to for safety inspections:lol3 But some of the auto zone , and parts quest type stores will have them on those help racks.
    #29
  10. Camas

    Camas Rooster Bastid

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    Kraftsman, you made my day! :clap I used ....most of your method. I drilled and retapped for a larger plug (was #10 now #12) but I figured since the local cycle shops are so incredibly incompetant that I might as well drill and retap fo a new larger bolt. The whole time using heavy marine grease and it did it's job of catching the srapnel. Yee haw!!
    I didn't think of getting the pics of the process until it was over but it only took about an hour and that is with beerz and the phone ringing.

    I called the local cycle shops. (Pro Caliber) They said and I qoute, " we wouldn't have an application for an oversize drain plug". :huh Huh? Apparently I am the only person on the planet that has ever had to deal with a stripped out oil plug. :lol3

    The process was simple with your's and the other's tips put together.

    THANK YOU ALL!!!!!!!:wink:
    #30
  11. ZZR_Ron

    ZZR_Ron Looking up

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    I've used a taper pipe thread in th past. Because of the taper, you never have to worry about it leaking again.

    Just pick the closest size, tap it, and thread it in.

    You can pick up an NPT plug to fit almost anywhere...
    #31
  12. Camas

    Camas Rooster Bastid

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    NPT? I should be smarter that this. Sorry but what is that acronym? ....No Plug Trouble?:ear
    #32
  13. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    National pipe thread.

    Or...No Pussy on Tuesdays
    #33
  14. scottyb

    scottyb Been here awhile

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    #34
  15. shrineclown

    shrineclown Board Butcher, Fastener Haberdasher Super Supporter

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    Simple, inexpensive and will work just fine. Hell you can buy that Fram quick oil change kit and even up the speed and cleanliness of your next oil change. :clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap
    #35
  16. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    I have a question about taps... 1/2x20 vs 1/2x13 - coarse vs. fine threads eh? How to tell what the standard automotive drain plug wants; you indicate it wants coarse threads, which makes sense in this application. But that stoopid parts store carries a fine thread tap set... :scratch

    THEN, for the 1/2x20 tap I have a recommendation of a 29/64 bit to provide "75% threads"... :scratch WTF does that mean? Obviously this thread creation business is complicated; any help out there? :ear
    #36
  17. JDLuke

    JDLuke Ravening for delight

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    That 75% business simply means that the threads you tap will be about 75% of the full defined thread size according to the established standards. For the vast, vast majority of applications, this is more than good enough. Basically it means there will be a small gap between the peaks of the tapped threads and the valleys of the bolt. This is very normal and nothing to really worry about, because cutting 100% depth threads is rather difficult and prone to tap breakage, and is really not needed for most things.

    A smaller tap drill will let you get more fully-formed threads, but you just might find yourself with a tap broken off in your engine case... No fun, that. Basically, 75% is a great tradeoff point between thread strength and tapping effort.
    #37
  18. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    Thank you Luke for telling me why. And regarding the 1/2x20 vs 1/2x13 (coarse vs. fine threads) I probably need to look for a 1/2x20 tap because an automotive oil drain plug is likely coarse-threaded eh?
    #38
  19. JAFO

    JAFO displaced Jeep guy.....

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    there is no "standard" auto drain plug. You need to find a drain plug and then size the tap to it. You can find both coars and fine threaded drains.

    Something noone's mentioned-- why not use a self-tapping, oversized drainplug? Also, if you have the room, those Quickdrain jobs from FRAM are handy in such a case, too. I've fixed a Jeep with them before- same problem you had, we took the FRAM quickdrain, degreased the pan and the permanently-mounted part of the QD, took some epoxy putty (JB Weld) and made an epoxy fillet around the base of the QD fitting and the pan. It works quite well, to this day.

    Of course, if the threads are so far gone they won't even hold the bolt in, that might not work. Also, if, like on my KLR, the drainplug is the absolute lowest point on the engine, you likely won't have the room for a 1/2" protrusion from the pan.

    Best bet is the Helicoil or the Timesert if you can swing 'em. If there's not enough depth above the hole, tapping will be problematic. In that case, I'd be looking at the selftapping drainplugor something like the Borg-Warner bolt, above.
    #39
  20. no

    no dreaming adventurer Supporter

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    The previous owner damaged the threads in the oil drain on my wife's DR650 to the point where the threads failed. I used one of those self-tapping drain plugs from the auto parts store in the oil drain. It's holding nicely with no leaks. There's a smaller plug in the center of the new plug that allows oil changes.

    It didn't look like there was enough room to try a helicoil (at least I wasn't willing to try) because the oil pump pickup screen is very close to the oil drain.
    #40