Old Guys with heavy bikes

Discussion in 'Dakar champion (950/990)' started by ktmrandy, Jul 13, 2015.

  1. Dustodust

    Dustodust Long timer

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    I would really like to see a lone rider website dedicated to an off road help database for adventure riders. Someone like me would be willing to go out on a rescue with a 4x4 pickup if I wasnt working at the time.
    And if I was stranded off road with my bike with a broken chain or fuel pump or stuck somewhere like the middle of Utah or on the Mojave Trail I would pay someone very well to come out and rescue . You cant even call a tow truck to come out in the sand but my 4x4 Toyota would make it a lot of places an adventure bike can go.
    Not all of us have people who can come out .
    It would be something to do for retired adventure riders. A chance to get out of the rocking chair and go on a rescue .
    A stranded rider could send spare parts money and gas money by Pay Pal to get certified rescue members to come out . Rescue responders could go through a simple certification process and riders could join up and agree to some simple rules.
  2. rockitman4x4

    rockitman4x4 ol retread

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    Yo old guys, I have a 2011 690 for sale. When I turned 63 I went out and got a 2013 990. Been to Dead Horse and up the CDR on it. Picking it up keeps me young. But I haven't had to pick it up for almost 2 weeks now. Cooked the clutch when I got it stuck on the Silver State trail a few weekends ago. Back up and running now, guess it's time to go out and lift it again. But truly I only dropped it once on the Alaska trip and only once on the CDR. Came close several times. I did drop it in the sand 2 weeks ago. Ride safe guys.
  3. notagraphicartist

    notagraphicartist Adventurer

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    If your eyes are so bad you can't see the winch line in that photo - I don't want you coming anywhere near me.
  4. rider911

    rider911 Shortcut Navigator

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    Hey Dust, you better tick another one off your riding buddies list :imaposer
  5. notagraphicartist

    notagraphicartist Adventurer

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    No worries - he seems more interested in ... something ... other than riding anyway...

    In case you still can't see it Dust -

    Attached Files:

  6. syzygy9

    syzygy9 Been here awhile

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    We need to get this thread back on track.

    Early 50's, Riding a 2011 KTM 990 with Safari tanks and Jesse Panniers. Dropped the bike in sand on a recent Aussie outback ride and for the first time couldn't pick the bike up. I was the tail end Charlie and knew it was going to be a while before the others realized I wasn't behind them, so unpacked everything I could (upper pannier, tank bag, water) and still couldn't get the pig up. Spooked me as I realized on my own in the middle of the very remote Aussie outback this could become a serious problem quickly. While waiting for my buddies to return I contemplated the situation and decided I need an absolute 100% way to get the bike up on my own and am going to play around with the ratchet strap on a pole idea. Needs to be light and compact.


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  7. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    I used to volunteer to sweep/be last, it allowed me to ride slower and help anyone needing help.
    Now that dirt naps have become harder to lift, I try and be 2nd from the last, and try to get someone else to sweep :lol3
    Follow this link to the Farkle thread for dirt nap lift ideas, and pm me should you have any questions, as I have made a few :1drink
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/thin...ost-your-farkels.279286/page-73#post-27437527
    There is some more discussion on this design for the next few pages in that Farkle thread :hmmmmm
    :D
  8. Dustodust

    Dustodust Long timer

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    I used to ride sweep on dual Dogs Sequoia dual sport for many years . I have had to push guys and ride their bikes up gnarly hillclimbs and through snow drifts. Guys their "buddies" left behind. I would never leave anyone behind.
    this one poor guy was so wore out in the snow patches over Summit Peak that he just could pick up his XR 400 anymore, I rode it through each snow drift for him and walked back to get mine
    Once I pushed about 50 bikes up a powdery hill climb. The riders just got in line and waited while other riders fell over on the hill and struggled to pick there bikes up. Being sweep I bumped up and parked on the hill and caught guys back ends sliding off the side and pushed others. Sure ate a lot of dust but felt it was the right thing to do. I dont think its right that I was the only one pushing. Finally some big guy with a accent from Austria on a cagiva elefant or something started helpng towards the end
    I also dont like it when guys just stand there when trying to recover someones bike from a ditch , winch or no winch. I think everyone in the group should pitch in.
    On the other hand, you should get your own bike up when you can, once I dumped my 950 going down White Mountain behind Big Bear and it was steep and rocky , my buddy asked if I needed help and I said no because there was no way to park a 950 there
    Another time the same buddy fell in some powder on a downhill and was pinned under his 525exc face down and couldnt get it off without my help
  9. Dustodust

    Dustodust Long timer

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    I heard a story about a bunch of riders I have rode with on a gnarly desert ride when it was hot and they left a guy behind to fend for himself. When they got back to the trucks he wasnt there so they backtracked and found him stuck down in one of those giant gullys with near impossible hill climbs out, he was dead from heat stroke. I dont think it would have happened if I was there.
  10. notagraphicartist

    notagraphicartist Adventurer

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    I get your concerns Dust - BUT when I'm using a winch what I don't want is a bunch of well intentioned idiots crowding around. Hell, I'd have told the guy standing to right of the anchor bike to move out of the way. The winch will do the work. More bodies weren't gonna get that bike out any faster - but more hands in the wrong places and feet to trip over were gonna get someone hurt.
    Maybe, before you open your "Adventure Rider Rescue" business you should look into taking some classes. 4x4 clubs usually hold them a couple of times a year, they can be pretty informative - mainly all the shit you SHOULDN'T do.

    No one in that set of photos was in danger of being left behind or dying of heat stroke.
  11. syzygy9

    syzygy9 Been here awhile

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    Maoule likes this.
  12. oldfuddy

    oldfuddy Long timer

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    ^^^^^ good example of where a winch wouldn't be much help. My xt17 would never reach all the way across the trail to the trees in that situation.
  13. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    Sorry, sounded like you knew about the "strap on a stick", the link's in my post #132 in this thread.

    Here's the Farkle thread link again, starting with something different developed by mrgizmow:
    http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/thinking-outside-the-box-post-your-farkels.279286/page-73
    You'll have to read thru a couple of pages of stuff, so be patient.
    I'm not one to start threads about what I've DIY'ed.
    :lol3
  14. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    Winch?
    Sure just connect it to a tree :dunno
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    :lol3
  15. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    Might be posted in this thread already...sorry

    OK, here's the Lift-Jack that I made, I've posted elsewhere, no vid though

    3 pole sections in and old sock, carried in my backpack/hydro-pack.
    Ratchet in a pouch, carried in my tool bag
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Ratchet/Magic Ring
    [​IMG]
    Assembled, in use
    That magic ring is a piece of PVC pipe and keeps the pole from bowing, I start with it about 1/2 way up, and it moves up with the strap when the end gets to it.
    [​IMG]
    The ratchet is slipped over the top of the pole, and the strap tightened by pulling the handle down and adding a wrench to the ratchet handle will increase the leverage/decrease the effort.
    [​IMG]
    Any element can be "upgraded" (bigger ratchet, thicker walled/larger steel tubing) for heavier bikes.
    I have other pole designs, but found this, thin walled steel to work the best.
    syzygy9 likes this.
  16. oldfuddy

    oldfuddy Long timer

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    Exactly.... That's the point.
  17. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie Supporter

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    My approach to the big lift was developed from 9 years and nearly 200,000 miles on a 2004 1150 GS Adventure.

    Though in more than 40 years of riding I’ve dropped a lot of bikes on their sides. I came to motorcycle travel from backpacking and camping. That means I initially saw motorcycle travel as having more capacity. But, as bikes got larger and have always required being pushed around at some point, I found that carrying more was a path into a spiral of diminishing returns. For me this also transcends motorcycling into my business travel. The more stuff I carry, the more stuff I have to keep track of, as well as cart around. Lifting into and out of shuttle busses, into and out of rental cars, and packing and unpacking at hotels.
    The same holds for motorcycle travel and becomes my focus for a good bit with my versions of adventure travel. For me lighter is best.
    To a point. That point is comfort. Though my levels and comfort points differ from others.

    Life on motorcycles began with backpacks, and duffel bags. Tankbags came along and backpacks went away. Rear racks added platforms for light kitchen gear, fairings supplied holes for rain gear and spare tubes and even cameras. Big SLR’s of the day.

    It took a few tries beginning from a CB360 Honda to finally discover hard bags and frame mounted fairings. Tank bags and custom seats.
    [​IMG]

    After about ten years of riding I’d moved along to BMW and come into sport touring though we did not know that was what we were doing. We thought we were just traveling.
    [​IMG]

    Kids came along and motorcycle travel, 2-up slipped into the background. My light travel mode moved to a mini-van. Traveling light translated through family means the van is stuffed to the ceiling and you still forgot your tooth brush. I learned to travel light for myself, and try hard to be organized for the kids stuff. Girls tend to bring lots of stuff. The void is filled and then things are held in the arms.

    Once the girls were well on their way to adulthood, I could wander off more by motorcycle. Though truth be told I had never really stopped. My motorcycle travel was almost always associated with some task I was working. Lots of travel for motorcycle related things that resembled jobs but paid like volunteer work. More good Karma than money, but I was riding a motorcycle so I figured I was well ahead of the game.
    Then I got an adventure bike. The 1150 GS Adventure took me two years of trawling forums, dealers and the net. Anything within a week’s ride was fair game in my book. I’d considered the 950 KTM, and the 1150. I tested a 950, and went with the BMW probably out of habit, (Old BMW mechanic, multiple test rides…). Boom!
    I had one. Rode it home from several states away using the not the most direct route.
    This was a fly-buy deal so I flew in with a duffel, and a checked duffel. My usual tool bag and riding gear with a few spare clothes. Where I didn’t stay with relatives I slept in motels. Took about a week.
    I had plenty of room in the Jesse’s and bungi-netted duffel. Traveling solo does that.
    [​IMG]

    Of course I slowly edged up the scale with more crap to carry. The culmination was commuting to the PNWet for work carrying a huge notebook computer and bag. Camping gear and a week’s worth of work clothes, plus tools to diagnose some gremlins that were slowly growing bolder. I vanquished them about halfway through my stay.
    [​IMG]

    I topped out loading with a topbox, full duffel, Kermit chair and that week’s worth of work clothing. But, I had along the way begun to whittle away at the load. My work clothes load dropped to synthetics that quickly dry out for pants and underwear. Two t-shirts four pair of wool socks and four sports shirts. I wore running shoes for work and off the bike, carrying my riding boots in the bags when at work. The computer got a tad bit lighter and smaller and I was able to change from the huge old fashioned bag to a sleeve-type TSA case. I still had quite the load in 2010,
    [​IMG]

    I took some dirt training and finally got up the gumption to take the Jimmy Lewis school on my big bike. I’d installed a lower OEM saddle given my lack of inseam. By the end of the school I was no longer liking the short saddle and sold it, and wore out two more stock height Adventure saddles, never venturing into the realm of lowered suspensions or cut down seats.
    Yes I dropped the bike a few times,
    [​IMG]

    That purple case is a full sized folding camp chair. Yeah, that went away.
    So did the big sleeping pad.
    Eventually all my gear for several weeks riding would fin completely inside the hard cases.

    Then came the 990R.
    I made the choice when I went to the KTM to get the 990 over a smaller 690 because I still required a motorcycle to commute on Southern California freeway, and occasionally run the interstate for a weekend.
    My dirt of choice is Cadillac. Smooth gravel graded and not too soft or deep. I get that some of the time, but not all of the time. The KTM makes me look like I almost know what I’m doing when I have other dirt to ride.
    I am now to the point where I can travel for indefinite periods on the bike with everything stowed in the bags. When I am primarily traveling off pavement I remove the top case and use a top bag. The top bag carries a warm layer, but floppy hat for shade, tow gear and tire repair. Everything else fits inside the two hard cases. Yes, I know the thing about soft luggage. But, since I like everybody else am a KLR rider at heart I am not going to spend the extra money for the softies until I no longer commute.The hard bags hold the bike up off the ground a bit so I don't have to stoop as far. I use my legs to lift rather than my back, and I work my legs riding bicycles specifically so riding motorcycles like I do is easier. A guy can't get better at this stuff by surfing the internet. It requires practice and real teachers. The dirt buddy's advice to lean back and gas it tends to get you into more trouble faster and that just isn't where I'm headed. I'm out there to see stuff, not see how fast I can race past it.
    I can pick my KTM when camping loaded up off its side in deep sand. Yes, I’ve tested this by myself alone. No pictures as it was hot and I was in a mood.
    [​IMG]

    I find it easiest to back up to the bike and lift the underside bar and use a handhold about where the bag upper forward mount is. I sometimes have a gear loop attached there to that purpose. Sometimes not. I’ve lifted the bike both ways.
    It is far easier off the driveway or in the grass than deep sand on an incline. Both can be accomplished, just practice and think about it. Nothing is gained by rushing.
    I try to not ride into things I can’t get out of.When I test something I do so when I'm not beat, and have the time.

    The first bike I ever picked up off the ground was my first bike. I dropped it in the muddy, freshly watered flowerbed out front of my in-laws home. I'd also managed to burn my leg on the exhaust pipe since I was barefoot and wearing shorts. I'd walked out front to move the bike. Forgot about the pipes and dump. I had to jump over the downed bike to land on the concrete downspout drain so I had something solid to stand on, and pick the bike up from there. At 21 that was a simple task. The bike was a CB360 that was heavy.
    Then I dropped my next bike at an intersection about 1am one morning on the way home from work. It was -22F, roads were only a little slick, I was wearing a snowmobile suit that the cuff had ridden up and was freezing my leg. The nearly new Norton would not snick into neutral so I reached across the tank with my right hand to hold the clutch in and when I reached down my left leg with my left hand the bike folded over on the right side.
    Still idling and still in gear, only now the gear lever was under the bike. I swapped hands, leaned down, grabbed the right grip with my right hand and lifted the bike up. Not wanting to shut the bike off and re-kick start it in the street and cold. The high school kids watching from the Taco Bell were amused. I didn't care. I was riding a dream bike, they were driving daddy's cars.
    Then I dropped that same bike in a gravel parking lot, stepping into a hole with my foot. A few BMW's followed all of which got dropped in the garage, on slick grass lawns, in the snow, on ice.
    I even dropped my CBR900 on my foot in the pits at a racetrack. That one others had to lift off of me since the peg had driven itself into that soft spot we have at the insides of our ankles, pinching and damaging the nerves. Which is why I wear Crossfires when traveling off road away from people.

    Practice on grass that is not wet or one of my favorites is a dry lake bed. smooth and pretty easy to lay the bike down with no damage. Carpet in a garage can work too. Work up to the loaded bike and figuring out the technique.

    I had a friend who was big enough that when removing the rear wheel from an airhead RT, he lifted the entire rear of the bike with one hand and removed the wheel with the other hand. Yeah, not somebody you would want angry at you. For us human sized people we worry the wheel out form behind between the bag mounting loop, fender, license plate and turn signal.
    That practice thing makes even that easier.
    gremlyn and syzygy9 like this.
  18. kenstone

    kenstone worn out

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    Wow, OK...
    There's a lot of things I'd be better at if I practiced/trained for it, but man's ingenuity in building tools for difficult tasks is a result of his (my) laziness.
    No disrespect, but I'm not you, and would rather use a tool.
    jmo,
    :lol3
  19. Y E T I

    Y E T I Unpossible

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    I'm not old enough to be in this thread technically, but at the time this happened I was waiting to have neck surgery so I was pretty weak. It doesn't really show well in the picture (does it ever?? :lol3) but the bike is on an incline with the wheels up hill. The ground was also very muddy (duh) and the bike was dug in so I couldn't spin it to get the wheels on the downhill side. My buddy was blissfully ahead of me and around the corner and had no idea I was down. 3 or 4 times I tried to lift the damn thing with my back to the bike but the mud and incline made it impossible.

    What finally got the bike upright?? I got REALLY pissed off and just bull dogged it up. Paid for it later but that's what beer is for. Maybe I have Hulk strength when I get mad? :dunno :lol3 I suppose I could have just waited til my friend realized I was missing, but then I'd have to listen to his shit for the rest of the trip through Baja. No way.

    [​IMG]

    Since getting the 950, I've practiced on the lawn once or twice and realized a good trick is to start putting thing under it to get it up a little ways. A helmet is a great first step. If there are rocks available, even better. Take the uphill bag off the bike and put it underneath the crash bars. Anything to get it even a little bit higher makes it that much easier to lift.
  20. KTM Mike

    KTM Mike Long timer

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    And rockitman sure keeps his 990 pretty...met him outside Glacier National Park just after he finished the CDR this summer. My wife and I were headed south on the Vstrom at the time.

    I am, I guess, a bit puzzled by this thread. Everybody has to ride what ever works for them..be it a 250, 690 or a 990. But now I wonder if I should worry..then again not?

    Riding two up, full camping luggage (which even two up we fit it all in the panniers tail bag and tank bag), on a big pig of a Vstrom 1000 I honestly dont find myself to worried about picking the bike up. I did drop the Vstrom last year in the Big Empty of Wyoming, (zero speed..damn sage brush got in the way!) miles from no where - the wife and I rather easily picked it up . Keep in mind, I have a bad back (ruptured disc the doc wants to a spinal fusion for), 52 years old, and its not like the wife is a big lady. Is it technique then? i dont know.

    One thing I did learn from years of Enduro racing - sometimes you have to slow down to go faster. This isnt a race, so Back off the pace so you know you are not going to risk dropping it - you wont waste time and energy picking it back up! I always said one crash in a race burned up 10 miles of riding energy. Yeah, sure its fun to push the pace, but dont ride over your head. I have the added incentive in that 95% of my ADV riding is two up - the uh...other consequences...if I were to ever drop the bike and hurt dear wifey keep me in check!