Old Tom, Captain Dave, and the Squid do the COBDR

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by OldTomRides, Sep 5, 2021.

  1. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

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    Well, when I last wrote here, we were still in Salida, CO waiting for The Squid's bike to be finished. Obviously, he did get it back. It was late enough though that rather than trying to make a lot of miles, we elected to just run up to Cottonwood Hot Springs and camp there for the night. It was awesome just sitting in that hot pool and letting it work on tired, old, muscles. The guy in the front office, who seemed to do a lot of jobs there, was a funny guy, probably a little older than I and when he asked what I was riding and I told him it was a KTM, he replied "Kan't Take Much", which I thought was hilarious. He had a lot of different descriptions for bike acronyms.

    Camping at Cottonwood Hot Springs:
    20210924_081519.jpg

    Left to right: The Squid, me (Old Tom), and Captain Dave.
    20210924_100722.jpg

    The next day (9/24/21) we roared up and down Cottonwood pass which is all paved. We didn't bother going to the Taylor Park Trading Post since we were gassed up and had lost enough time in Salida. We had three significant water crossings all of which were easy because the water is pretty low in September. Rode through Tincup and Pitcan which were really well kept up remote towns. Much nicer than some of the ones we passed in the IDBDR.

    Tincup home:
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    The next pass was Cumberland pass which was also pretty uneventful, but had nice views. A nice lady took several pictures of the three of us and the one I'm showing you has that really good looking orange bike in the foreground.

    20210924_115051.jpg

    On the way down we passed some old mining buildings, which were pretty collapsed. We made one wrong turn which I believe was an alternate hard section, which when we figured it out, turned around (after picking up Squid's bike), and got back on the standard route. I came back down, opened the gate and then waited for Captain Dave and The Squid to catch up. You can see a small water crossing at the bottom of the road, but in September it was literally nothing but a puddle. We just rode around it.

    20210924_144906.jpg

    We hit Lake City somewhat late in the evening, but Captain Dave was able to snag a cabin at the Town Square Cabins. It was nice to have a bed to sleep in after 160 miles. We were a little worn out. We had dinner at the Packer Saloon, which I can highly recommend for good eats. While there, we met three guys on KTMs heading north which was great because we were able to ask them about some of the passes we'd be running through. After their description of Ophir Pass (we met another guy who also corroborated their opinion) as loose shale which even going down was tough, we decided we'd bypass that one. It's good to know your limits and that of your bike too. After our experience on the four passes leading up to Ophir, we were glad we made that decision.

    20210925_074436.jpg

    More on the next day's four-pass ride tomorrow.
    #21
  2. TDC_ERock

    TDC_ERock Been here awhile Supporter

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    Looking forward to this - I'm picking up a 390 Adventure in the next week or so!
    #22
  3. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

    Joined:
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    Today's entry is for the four passes of Section 2, starting with Cinnamon Pass on 9/25/21. It's a rocky road but only has a couple of really sharp switchbacks. They're the last two before reaching the summit. It's not too difficult, but on the first switchback I wasn't going fast enough, lost my balance and dropped the bike. Tried to take a picture of it napping with my phone, but apparently it didn't go because I had my gloves on. Then not too far from the summit I get off track, run into a bush, keep the bike upright, then lose my balance and drop the bike anyways. Crap! Captain Dave is already at the top, but The Squid waited till he knew I was moving, which I thought I would be able to, so he kept going. I got lucky and a big guy from Ohio following me in a SUV stopped and helped me pick up the bike. After that I made it up without incident.

    Cinnamon Pass Road.png Cinnamon Pass Sign.jpg

    Here's where it gets dumb. I couldn't find my phone in my tankbag and I'm thinking that it fell out on one of the two times I dropped the bike. So Captain Dave and I go all the way down to those last two switchbacks to look for it. The ride down is easy and we're looking all the way. We get down to the last switchback, I park the bike and walk down to the other one. Nothing. Crap. I'm all kinds of pissed because it's my own fault. So we turn around and head back to the pass. I get to the top and I'm rummaging around in my tankbag, lo and behold, my phone is there! It was just on edge behind something else and I didn't see it. Talk about dumb! The guys did NOT let me forget about that for the remainder of the trip. Captain Dave was also particularly happy that I fell more than he did. Brothers are like that.

    We made it down Cinnamon pass without any more falling and enjoyed walking around the old mining town of Animus Forks. For those that haven't been there, it was a mining town originally called "Three Forks of the Animas" and at one time held around 450 people. Started in around 1873, most of the mining stopped by 1910 and by the 20's was a ghost town. There are several buildings in remarkably good shape, no doubt kept standing by some historical foundation in Colorado. We walked around taking a bunch of pictures before heading up to California Pass.

    Animas Forks House.jpg Animas Forks Boys.jpg

    California Pass isn't necessarily hard, but it was a Saturday when we were on it and the passes were like Grand Central Station (fall colors you know). Trucks, Jeeps, side-by-sides, and four wheelers all over the place. And you know how hard it is to get started on a steep uphill climb. So we had to wait now and then. The Squid fell, Captain Dave stopped to help him, had to wait for about 15 vehicles to go by (it really starts to get aggravating), but eventually Squid made it to the top. Then the Captain dropped his bike just turning it around to get going (he had pulled off to the side on a corner. Fortunately a guy in a side-by-side stopped to help him up and got him pointed in the right direction. When we got to the top, we just took a quick snap of the sign and started down. That's when things got really "interesting" for me.

    Captain Dave had a slight get-off next to a bank and I bailed off on a little flat spot on the side, parked my bike, to help him get moving, but he handled it himself. I started off down hill, got caught in the same loose crap that my brother did, fell against the same bank, but managed to get my foot pinned pointing backwards by my bike. Blue language was heard at this point. It was very painful and I didn't know at the time whether I had torn something or not. Didn't feel broken Fortunately we were still in comm range so Captain Dave came up and exactly five minutes later he extricated me from the hillside. I tested my knee and while it hurt, everything seemed to be functional. We got the bike uprighted, I got on it and rode down to a little area at the bottom hear Lake Como. We collected ourselves a bit before we continued on.

    Left to right: Squid riding up California Pass Road, waiting for traffic, Captain Dave falling against the bank, my view of Captain Dave coming to my rescue, Hurricane Pass sign

    Squid up California.png Waiting for Traffic - California.png Dave falls.png My View.png Hurricane Pass.png

    We rode past Hurricane Pass which is a short one after California Pass so it just rated a quick picture. Then continued on down and got to the last one which is Corkscrew Pass. This one is not a nasty road, but it is very steep going up and down, and of course we're always followed by a Jeep or something. Because of the steepness, I found it hard to slow down at times, locking up the rear wheel and just skidding into a corner now and then. If I haven't mentioned it, I put a 14 tooth sprocket to gear the bike down some. It helped, but this descent was kind of scary. At least one turn I had to go wide and bail out of the corner because I was going too fast. One corner Captain Dave fell, got his bike uprighted and The Squid and I were stacked up waiting. While we were waiting some yay-hoo on an e-bike with his little daughter on the bike in front of him whizzed by. Call me "old" but I'd never do that with a little kid down that steep slope. He certainly has skills because he zipped on down with no problems, so maybe I'm out of line. Anyways, Squid took off and I thought I was giving him enough room but I picked up too much speed. In probably some of the best moves of my life, I avoided hitting him and taking us both down, missing him by inches. We stopped to let our heartrate slow up and continued on down to a little area with an outhouse to take a break.

    We hadn't been there very long when up comes a 1 ton pickup truck with three rows of tourist seating instead of a pickup bed. This guy was taking these tourists up what we had just came down from! He was pretty funny and had a schtick for the group where he's got a "baby badger" he's going to release. It's a fake furry tail that springs out of a box at them and makes them jump. He was pretty entertaining and we added local color since we had just come down the mountain. We told them we'd be praying for them!

    Tourist Truck.jpg Tourist Guide.png

    The rest of the way down to the Million Dollar Highway (550) was nearly uneventful, but we still got surprised by three more jeeps and wouldn't you know it, The Squid and I dumped our bikes again! Insult to injury. Though the only injury was our pride. We hit the highway and rode on into Ouray having elected to skip Ophir Pass. You youngsters with better skills and lighter bikes can have that one. This was the better part of valor this old fart.

    Did I mention that The Squid dropped his kickstand? The bolt vibrated out and Captain Dave picked the kickstand up a day or two back. So in Ouray they found a hardware store and got it fixed. We headed off to Ridgway to spend the night at the KOA there. Here's another plug for a great place to stay. They have a really awesome restaurant where I had a three meat place of smoked brisket, ribs, and pulled pork. It was great and we had some nice conversations with some other riders there. One group in particular were two guys from New York who were trailering their KTM and DR650 (I think) and riding light when they'd get to their next riding area. Smart guys. Anyways, we had showers, did some laundry, and pretty much licked our wounds. Well I did anyways. The hard part was over for us. We'd zip down to Four Corners next and then meet up with some other buddies that were in the area for the ride back home.

    My dinner:

    KOA Dinner.jpg

    PS. For those that are wondering, I didn't have any major knee damage. My Physical Therapist son checked it out when I got home and it appears to be just a strained ligament near my MCL. My knee turned black and blue (still is at this writing), but that night I got ice on it and a wrap and that kept it from getting worse. I wear Forma Terra EVO X boots and that kept my foot safe.

    Next up: The end of the COBDR
    #23
  4. yelladog

    yelladog extrovertedintrovert

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    Ahhspen, muffy!
    Hey bud, enjoying your posts and thanks for the entertainment! I just got back home to Aspen yesterday after finishing section 6. I found the route finding around section 5 to be difficult near Radium. following along....
    #24
  5. yelladog

    yelladog extrovertedintrovert

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    Ahhspen, muffy!
    I used to live in Lake City as a fly fishing guide around 2000. I learned to love those passes around there when I lived there, and during my latest COBDR, I got to ride in torrential rain/snow at Animas Forks getting stuck behind side by sides who had no idea I was behind them for miles on end. I feel your pain dealing with non-motorcyclists...we need momentum to keep going...haha! Thanks for the great read, and happy you guys made it back safely.
    #25
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  6. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

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    Last day of the COBDR, Section 1, 9/26/21.

    After a great dinner last night, we woke up again to beautiful morning sunshine. After a camp breakfast we got packed up and on the road at about 8:20am. Today we were going to be trying to meet up with our good friends Bill and Dan who were on matching BMW1200GTs and riding through Colorado, albeit on paved roads. We were shooting for Monticello, Utah as a middle ground since we still needed to get to Four Corners and finish the COBDR. But because of the time, we decided to skip the dirt part of the day and just blitz down on highway 145. But first we looped around the mountains north of Telluride so I could show them that town. I was there back in 2014 for a Bluegrass Festival and loved the town. Of course it's gotten to be even more touristy and expensive than it was seven years ago. We parked across from the library and split up for souvenirs and a bit later had lunch at Baked In Telluride, my favorite bakery (I had breakfast there every morning during that week in 2014).

    Dirty bikes always seem to get attention:
    Attention in Telluride.jpg

    It was good to get out of there though - too many people and it was pretty dang warm. So we made our way to 145 and rode down to Delores where the dirt section meets up with the pavement for the final ride to the corners. While there we chatted with this group of three from Gee-or-gia. These big ol' boys, riding big beemers had the thickest accent and told about their travels. It was a nice chat but the three of us felt like hobbits standing next to them.

    Delores stop.jpg

    Back on the road, we got to Four Corners for our obligatory photos. Kind of funny how you have to line up to take turns taking pictures. It wasn't really crowded, but it was too bad we couldn't take our bikes down there.

    Four Corners 2.jpg Four Corners.jpg

    But the BDR was officially over. We only skipped a couple of things and I'm not really sorry. I have found chatting with people doing the BDRs that you each make the route what you want it to be and not be a slave to the route and GPS. That's what we did and I loved this most challenging of routes that we've done. Mud, snow, dirt, rocks, sand, high passes, low valleys - the COBDR has it all. I feel particularly lucky to have done it in September when all the trees are turning color. It was brilliant.

    COBDR_colors.jpg

    Now it was time to head north and meet our friends. It was about 10 till 4pm when we headed out of Four Corners. We rolled into Monticello an hour later after riding through our only rainstorm on the trip. Gotta love Frog Toggs and new boots. We were completely dry and met up with Bill and Dan too. We all got rooms at a little motel and then walked to The Granary Bar & Grill and had a great dinner, telling stories about our trips and making plans for the following day.
    #26
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  7. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

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    The journey home begins, 9/27/21

    Our original plan was to head south from Monticello and then take highway 95 north, head over near Loa, then head north again, camping near Fairview for the evening. But when we got past Blanding to the 95 turn off, my friends Bill and Dan were just coming back and told us that the highway was closed due to construction or something. So we continued south on 191 through Bluff and eventually heading west on 163 which brought us to the Valley of the Gods road which was an original target back when we had more time. So we decided to take that.

    It's an easy dirt road about 117 miles long and you can see amazing red rock formations all along the way. It was a great detour for us. When you get to the end, you can head north up the Moki Dugway which is a dirt road series of switchbacks (the corners are paved I think to prevent undue erosion) with spectacular views all the way. I wouldn't necessarily want to do it with a long trailer, but on bikes it's easy peasy.

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    Once at the top, we blasted up 261 to connect up to 95 again. Right at that intersection is where the highway was blocked off going south. Following the highway, we moved northwest and went through the north end of Glen Canyon past the old townsite of Hite. I can't recommend this enough for people wanting to see some amazing scenery! The rock formations, the canyon - some of the coolest terrain I've seen. And on a cloudless day it was even better. Well worth your time if you're in the area.

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    From there we continued to Hanksville where we stopped for lunch, then west towards Loa and then north again until we reached Ferren and decided it was time to find a place to camp. We settled in at Millsite State Park, which is located next to a small reservoir. This was certainly one of the more picturesque campsites we had. Not very many people there either. We met a guy on a BMW GS that we invited over to our fire after dinner. That's one of the nice parts about traveling this way - meeting new people and hearing about their adventures. The sky was cloudless and the stars were definitely out. You could clearly see the Milky Way. We chatted until about 9:30pm when we all hit the sack.

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    #27
  8. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

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    Second day of the journey home: awesome scenery and crappy winds, 9/28/2021

    We got on the road by 9am, topped up with gas in Ferren, and headed north on hwy 10, then turned northwest on 31. This is a nice stretch of twisty and scenic road, passing through nice little towns. This road crosses the Skyline Drive Scenic Backway. This was a road that was an option in our original (before we left Spokane) route home that I wish we could have ridden on. It's a dirt road that runs along the backbone of the Manti La Sal National Forest mountains. We would have taken it from I-50 north to US-6. We saw some videos and while not difficult, the views would have been amazing. Those of you who are reading this, take note of that. I believe it's worth doing.

    But for us, it was connecting from hwy 31 to the Mt. Nebo Scenic Loop, which we did by riding through Mt. Pleasant and Moroni, and then heading up hwy 132. The Nebo is well worth your while to ride especially when you do it when we did, in the fall. The Aspens, Birches, and Tamaracks were all changing color and it was a arboreal light show the whole way. The road is also nice and twisty so that adds to the fun. Maybe it was because Tuesday is a workday, but we didn't have any traffic problems. Stopped when we had some amazing vista to look at, but otherwise kept a nice comfortable pace. The byway takes you eventually to Payson where we stopped for lunch.

    20210928_102238.jpg

    That was the end of the nice riding. From Payson we slogged down to US-6 and on to Eureka (that makes at least three towns of that name that I've ridden through), then up 36 to Tooele and eventually turning west on I-80. Can I just say that if this wasn't hell, it was the highway to get there? Ruthlessly straight and again dealing with 40+ mph crosswinds for pretty much the entire crossing. Go look at it on a map. There's like two corners to speak of and the rest is boringly straight. To say we were worn out again is an understatement. Only when we closed in on Wendover where the hills provided a little break were we delivered from perpetually leaning right. We were originally going to camp, but it was an easy decision to get a motel. Strangely, there wasn't much available and we soon found out why. The speed finals on the Bonneville Salt Flats was this week. We lucked out timing-wise because they had to cancel today's running due to the high winds, but tomorrow was forecasted to be a quiet day.

    So we checked into a Motel 6, unloaded our crap, walked to the Salt Flats Cafe for a mexican dinner, did some laundry, took showers, and called it a night. It was a day of highs and lows and we were plum tuckered out.

    20210928_174851.jpg 20210928_180256.jpg


    Fast Times at the Bonneville Salt Flats, 9/29/2021

    It was another beautiful day with no wind and we were rarin' to go to see the flats! We got breakfast down at the cafe and then headed over to the Salt Flats, stopping at the gas station there to fill up and so I could buy a t-shirt. While there we ran into a guy riding solo, just retired from the Army. He had some great stories! Because it was finals week, we had to pay $20 each to get in, but looking back, I don't mind. After taking some obligatory pictures at the entrance sign, we headed in. We had no idea where we should go or where we couldn't go. We rode to the end where I stopped and talked to some guys in what turned out to be the spectator area where he told us how things worked. We watched a couple cars go by from the spectator area at about 287 or so mph - pretty dang cool! We wanted to ride around the flats and get some video but wanted to make sure we weren't getting in anyone's way. No big deal because there was plenty of room off to one side to the northwest of the track area.

    20210929_114817.jpg

    So we set up our cameras and did a bunch of silly stuff, back and forth. We tried gunning it and throwing some salt, but discovered that the flats are rock hard underneath. You'd throw a pitiful amount of salt and then leave a black streak from your tires. After we tired of that, we decided to go over to where they actually start their runs. Again, we didn't know if we were supposed to be there or not, so we just did. Turns out it's just fine to be there and watch. We were just getting our warm clothes off to walk around when a guy in racing leathers came up to chat with us. He saw our bikes and luggage and knew we were probably BDR guys. His name was Trev Richter and he knows Pete and Ashley from Mosko Moto, which me and my brother use for luggage (Reckless 80, v2). Turns out he's an ADV riding instructor and we had a great time talking about our trip and he shared stuff about his experiences. Would loved to have had him teaching us before we started all this BDR stuff. He was there to race and we'd catch back up to him later.

    Three-on-Bonneville.png

    We walked up to the start and watched a huge muscled up Corvette get ready. I knew nothing of how this works, but most of these cars are so high geared that they need to be pushed up to speed. This vette just idled away while the truck pushed it pretty dang fast. I don't know how fast, but eventually we could hear it rev up and go on it's own power. We walked on down the line up taking pictures until we caught up with Trev and his "girl friend" Erin Sills. Trev was quick to point out that it's Erin that's the racing legend - he's just catching up. And he is right! Checkout this article from their 2019 record-breaking run to find out more. It was so interesting to hear what they do and how they do it. It was a pleasure to meet them and I was hoping they'd get more records set. (I checked with Trev when I got home and they had some good runs, but not enough for a record)

    Corvette getting pushed down the track:
    vette-getting-started.png

    Left to right: Erin explaining how racing on the salt flats work, the Hunter/Sills bike, Group shot (Erin, Trev, Old Tom, Squid, and Captain Dave kneeling)
    20210929_112642.jpg 20210929_111554.jpg 20210929_112504.jpg


    Cool cars, bikes, and trucks lined up to run:
    20210929_105754.jpg 20210929_110906.jpg 20210929_111157.jpg 20210929_111208.jpg 20210929_111438.jpg

    This was a great morning and I wasn't sorry we spent all that time there. It was another awesome part of the trip. But it was time to head home. We reluctantly got back on to I-80 and headed northwest, then turned north on US-93 taking us across into Idaho passing through Twin Falls, where we again jumped on a free way (I-84) and rode into Boise. We found a patch of grass at the Meridian KOA which also gave us showers and a hot tub. We ate dinner at Shari's which was a couple blocks away and finally got some pie, which we had been talking about for the whole trip. After that it was time to call it a day.

    20210929_193618.jpg 20210929_205410.jpg

    The Last Day, 9/30/2021

    What can I say about the ride home? Not much. We just took US-95 up through Lewiston and then finally home, just missing the rain. Unfortunately The Squid had 45 more miles to go and he did it in the rain and in the dark. But that was it. I showed 3,416.5 miles on my overall trip meter from start to finish.


    My Conclusions

    This really was an epic trip for a bunch of over-the-hill guys. There are limits to every bike and man and we found both on this trip. This makes the third BDR we've completed, Washington being the first, then Idaho last year. Colorado is clearly the hardest of the three and Idaho the easiest. Even if the weather is good, the terrain is hard. If you have rain, there are areas that are flat impassable. We were told this before hand and having been there, I agree with it. We were fortunate to have only had sloppy conditions from the rain on only one day. I don't want to make it sound like it was super hard, but depending on what you're riding, your gear/luggage, and experience level, this could be just a super fun ride, or misery on two wheels. For us it was neither of those extremes. We had a great time, seeing some amazing views and riding through some really enjoyable areas. I would recommend this to any properly experienced rider with a couple caveats.

    First caveat is weight. We saw people on straight dirtbikes with no luggage, but literally no one was fully loaded as we were for camping that we saw on the BDR. I know others do it like we do, but we just didn't see anyone this trip. In some towns yes, but their bikes were too clean to be on the route. The KTM 390 weighs about 375 or so with a full tank of gas. I know I'm hauling 60 lbs of luggage, and then there's the 170 lbs (buck naked) of me. You add that up and it's a bit over 600 lbs total. That can be a bit to ride up and down steep slopes. I found the bike had plenty of power for all the climbing I made it do. Very pleased with that. However, what goes up, must come down, and coming down is where the problem lies. There's a point on a steep slope that no matter what you're gearing is, if you have a lot of weight, that momentum is a bitch that's going to slap you in the butt. I had the skills to keep from killing myself or others, but had one close call with The Squid on the downhill side of Corkscrew pass that nearly had me loading my shorts. I still don't know how I missed him. I was locked up and sliding sideways. If we were hotelling it the whole way and were carrying minimal luggage, things might have been different. Certainly more expensive, but I can see how if you're on say a 350 EXC with a little Mosko Reckless 10, zipping up and down those passes would be a dream. So my point here is that you need to consider ALL the weight that is on your bike and whether you can handle it under steep conditions, rocky roads, mud, etc.

    Second caveat is power. I bought the 390 because I was looking for a cross between a dirt bike and a street bike. Within certain parameters, it is that bike. But ... when you're on the freeway or other fast road, there's no replacement for displacement, as the saying goes. I'm riding Bridgestone Adventurecross AX41 tires front and back. All loaded up and on the freeway, yes, I can cruise at 75-80 mph. But I have to tell you, the bike is twitchy. That's the best word I can find to describe it. Getting passed at 80 uphill by a semi because you're tapped out power-wise is not fun, let me tell you. With our load, 65 is very comfortable and stable. I'd ride all over the place at that speed - but not on a freeway where the speed limit is 80 and you're getting passed all all the time. I mean, I hate freeways anyways on any bike - there's just no fun there. But sometimes you have to bite the bullet and man-up if you're going to get some place at a particular time. On the other hand, when you're actually on the BDR itself, the dirt roads, the passes, etc, the little 390 has everything you need (except excessive ground clearance and even that wasn't a problem). We motored up every pass with out problems. I put a 14 tooth sprocket on front which I believe helped on the trip (switched it on in Baggs, WY). So consider the power equation: how much weight are you willing to sacrifice (adding more I mean) to have the horse power you want?

    So the KTM 390 is not the unicorn my brother was hoping for. But I love this little bike. It's light enough to be very maneuverable on dirt tracks, has enough power to be fun, was flawless mechanically for the 3400 miles of the trip, and averaged over 57 mpg for those miles. I dropped it left and right and between the crash bars and luggage, it came out with nary a scratch (that I can see). I will say that I was nervous every time because that rear brake pedal just screams "break me!" But is it a RTW bike? Heck no, it wasn't designed for that. But I feel I've proved it's a solid ADV bike, at least to my mind. Doesn't have the weight of it's bigger brothers, nor the expense. Ride it well, keep it within it's parameters and this bike will do the job and you'll have fun on it. I'm certainly not sorry I bought it and can't wait for the next adventure. Maybe one not quite so far away this time though.

    20210929_103345.jpg
    #28
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  9. TDC_ERock

    TDC_ERock Been here awhile Supporter

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    Great report. I'm a soon-to-be WA 2020 390 Adventure owner. I'm picking up mine as soon as I can get down to Prosser to pick it up! From how you describe it, the 390 should handle the WABDR without too much difficulty.
    #29
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  10. RebornRider

    RebornRider Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
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    Just found this tread. Looking forward to reading it through when I have a little more time. I do have a 390A in my stable of two ( VStrom 1000 ). Thanks for sharing.
    Ride safe all.
    Gary
    #30
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  11. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

    Joined:
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    Yes, it will do it just fine. I would absolutely take my 390 on the WABDR. The only real difficult parts of it are the babyhead rock sections and that's just a matter of keeping your speed up and let the suspension do its job. You'll enjoy this bike.
    #31
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  12. norton(kel)

    norton(kel) Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,658
    Location:
    Berthoud CO.
    Just found you report. Nice trip, thanks.
    #32
  13. norton(kel)

    norton(kel) Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    3,658
    Location:
    Berthoud CO.
    A tip for going downhill and managing your speed. Keep throttle up supplying power to the rear wheel, while riding the rear brake to keep the speed down. This will keep your rear wheel from locking up and having you lose control due to skidding. You’ll need to practice it as your brain will be telling you that supplying power will make you speed up. This works, try it, you’ll like it.:jack
    #33
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  14. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    164
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    Wow, that sounds hard, but makes mechanical sense. I will definitely look into that.
    #34
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  15. gianttrack

    gianttrack Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    Oddometer:
    131
    Location:
    Estes Park, CO
    Nice report! It made my day to read that you met Trev and Erin at Bonneville! Great folks and small world.
    Dave
    #35
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  16. okietrailboss

    okietrailboss Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,499
    Location:
    indian territory
    Two things, what are the bags you have on the front crashbars and did you try any of the traction control settings for the downhill sections thanks
    #36
  17. OldTomRides

    OldTomRides Still on two wheels Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Oddometer:
    164
    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    The bags on front are Giant Loop Pannier Pockets. They're not waterproof - more like water-resistant, but they held my tools nicely. Which gave me a bit more room elsewhere. And were quickly accessible which I really liked.

    About the TC settings the answer is no, I didn't try them. I had ABS and MTC both off. But that is a really interesting thought. I wonder what would have been the result leaving ABS and MTC on going downhill? It should have prevented me from skidding, but would it have kept me from going as slow as I did or would it have ended up allowing my speed to be faster? I'd love to hear of others experimenting with that. I may try to play with that next year. Nice question!
    #37
  18. okietrailboss

    okietrailboss Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 13, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,499
    Location:
    indian territory
    I can't answer that my wife just got a 390 and we haven't played with that stuff yet be interesting to here the comments
    #38