One last KTM build

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by ktmtraveler, Nov 20, 2019.

  1. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Not the first time I mention on ADV I love my KTM hack. It’s tough, beautiful, iconic.
    
I dragged it up Monarch Pass, CO and drove it over the Million Dollar Highway, I hauled it through Death Valley NV and over the long hot Loneliest Road, I tortured it in the hot deserts in Utah, just saved it from being wrecked in the European-like impatient traffic in San Francisco and New Orleans, went from Miami to San Francisco and back. And I put it in danger on the busy roads of Europe and on some passes in the Alps. Packed it with too much stuff.
    
A woman on the campground in Lee Vining, CA asked me if I put lots of shoes and make up in those cases. Yeah right.

    IMG_0444.jpg 

Here’s what I really dragged along in this picture on Tioga Pass, CA:
    
A five person tent -we need our space-, sleeping bags, cooking equipment, a jet boil, coffee mugs, coffee, food, chairs, Dutch wooden shoes, tools, motor oil, chain lubricant, coolant, a jack, spare parts and a 55 gallon drum of mineral clutch oil, because my clutch slave cilinder leaked for 5000 miles on that trip. And a laptop, a radio, jumper cables, an 8-meter extension cord with American plug for our European gadgets, bank calculators and clothes. And the dirty laundry. Detergent.
    
Oh, I forget a case: a tarp, a mosquito net, towels, rain gear, the glass of the Rainforest café in Nashville (still undamaged until today), a beautiful stone that Marc gave us in Cannonville, UT (still taking good care of that), at least 60 orange wooden shoe keychains, to give away to nice people, a cooling vest, old motorcycle pants from mr ktmtraveler aka Jan that he only (and really only) will put on during his track day at Laguna Seca and then throws away. Plus a cooler bag. And a brush to wipe the desert sand out of the tent. A toiletries bag. Yes, including a tiny bit of make up. And yes, shoes: sneakers and flip flops.
    
With all those packs I had to shift to a lower gear regularly on the mountain passes. Not because of the steepness. It just lacked a bit power. I had to encourage my hack to go up. Whisper in its ear. ‘You can make it, buddy! Hang in there!’ I have the feeling that I push it too much to the limit and the bike wears out way too fast.
    
Some time ago I asked the technical guru at our Dutch bike shop about this. He was shocked. ‘That bike is undestroyable! No worries, it’s fine!’ And so I rode off again on several trips. It sometimes leaves me standing in the rain with some kind of technical trouble. The tires wear out every 3000 miles. But it rides like a hoot and I’m so used to the wobbly character that wants to go left and right, up and down, all at the same time.
    
Yes, I love my hack.
    
Now the time has come to replace it. With pain in the heart. Like abandoning a pet.
    
And so it goes. The King is dead, long live the King.
    
Hope you like to follow along on this build. Sure, you can skip the babbling and go for the pictures. I won’t know.

    IMG_0294.jpg 



    #1
  2. Neptune03

    Neptune03 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Oddometer:
    136
    Location:
    Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia
    I can't wait to see what you pick. I absolutely love any and all KTM's. In my heart of hearts, I bleed Orange :-)
    #2
    ktmtraveler likes this.
  3. PowderMonkey

    PowderMonkey Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    Oddometer:
    315
    Location:
    Maine
    I wouldn’t know what to do with the available hp of a ktm! Wait, yes I do
    #3
    ktmtraveler likes this.
  4. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,995
    Location:
    Tacoma - ish, WA
    Shoes! And party dresses!

    I think there would even be enough room for lipstick on a nice new 1290!
    #4
  5. MGV8

    MGV8 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,012
    Location:
    Canoe BC
    :lurk
    #5
    ktmtraveler likes this.
  6. Miggins1

    Miggins1 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Oddometer:
    157
    Location:
    Cheshire, England
    This could be good!
    #6
  7. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Thanks for all the nice comments and the interest in this build.

    Today we took the 1290 and rode to Motorcenter Venlo, a distance of 25 kilometers on the straight Napoleon Road. The only curves are roundabouts and we rode this stretch hundreds of times. Pretty boring. I volunteered to be the monkey and took pics of some late fall colors.

    IMG_1881.jpg

    In the shop my new bike was ready for take-off. I decided for this project to buy me a KTM 1190 Adventure R. Few years old, some kilometers on the clock. I got a good deal from Motorcenter Venlo. It’s a very pretty and strong 150hp adventure bike. Jan offered to ride it to LBS, for I hardly ever ride a two-wheeler anymore. I’m a born sidecarist. And for Jan it’s not a sacrifice.

    IMG_1891.jpg

    IMG_1893.jpg

    I followed him on the 1290. It’s a bit cold, just above freezing temp. Well, as the Scandinavians say: there’s no bad weather, just bad clothing. Party dress, @DRONE ? Not today! I wear my double winter motorbike pants over my jeans and two jackets over my fleece vest. Gloves, helmet, double thick buff. Not cold at all. Having a ball on the 1290.

    I’m still struck by the power and easy handling of Jan’s 1290. Not a problem to go 80mph on the freeway. Faster is possible, but not necessary. Just for overtaking I go a bit faster. In a few months the speed limit in The Netherlands is going down from 130 kmh to 100 kmh, during day time. Well, to be honest: I own a nice Ford Ranger Wildtrak with 200hp and now a bit over 100.000 kilometers on the clock. Almost all freeway-kilometers.

    IMG_0221.jpg

    Average speed on all those 100.000: 62 kmh. Traffic is pretty crazy overhere. No harm done. We live near the German border and we all know how the Germans handle speed limits. They just pretend there isn’t any.

    Dropped the bike off at LBS. Ad is going to make something special for it. I wanted a Boxer sidecar first. Like on our Honda Shadow.

    Ad very persistently talked me out of that last week. Too wide and bulky for the slender bike. He showed me the Ott Euro 3, which he had brand new in his shop.

    IMG_0995.jpg

    IMG_0996.jpg

    After five minutes of contemplating I was convinced. It’s a not too big, narrow sidecar. It looks like the Stern Rox on the 1290, but some sizes smaller. Light and probably easy to swing around corners. Ad will dress it up adventurously, with frames and racks, matching the fresh color scheme of the bike. He will pay extra attention to a sporty riding style, which he thinks I have. Ha! He never saw me ride. I keep it that way.

    The first problem or challenge is knocking on our door. The wheel house of the Ott is too narrow for the KTM wheel. And Ad doesn’t know a good polyester guy, who can work on that. The rear and sidecar wheel will be the same as on the 1290. The spare that Jan carries will fit on both our hacks. I go for traveling light and won’t have a spare.

    I’m sure Ad will work this out. And all other challenges he encounters on this building adventure.

    IMG_1898.jpg
    #7
  8. twintwin

    twintwin Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    895
    Location:
    NL
    Congratulations. Exciting times, the build is one of the sweetest moments of a sidecar life. Watching a new odd vehicle taking shape, with your choices and requirements, makes it your own and special what of a kind rig. Looking forward to being introduced in person to this awesome project after completion.
    #8
    ktmtraveler likes this.
  9. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    13,094
    Location:
    SWFL WNC
    You gotta be kidding!
    IMG_0444.jpg
    #9
  10. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #10
    brstar and Bobmws like this.
  11. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Thanks, @twintwin. I’m very curious about how this rig will be developing. I guess your project will arrive at the finish earlier. I’m sure it’s gonna be awesome!
    #11
  12. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Been awhile since I wrote. That’s because I had nothing to tell. It has been a boring, grey, windy and wet winter. And just when we were getting prepared for spring (yes, I saw some trees blossoming the last few days) we got the first snow of this season. Today. 26th February.

    IMG_1147.jpg

    The Netherlands is on the same latitude as, let’s say, Newfoundland, or Vancouver. But we have a relatively mild climate. We get some snow pretty much each winter. It’s never been this late. Not that I can remember, anyway.
    Today I drove to LBS to drop off the right case. Ad needs it for measuring the right distance between bike and sidecar. My plan is to use hubby Jan’s old 1190 cases. And get them painted black.

    IMG_0198.jpg

    The cases are covered with stickers from our USA trip. Pic above is from Savannah, GA. I spent some cosy Sunday afternoons getting high on sticker-remover-liquid heated up with my hairdryer. I may be crazy, but I actually like these kind of terrible painstaking chores. I removed them all. Turned out that was useless. Keep reading.
    I was welcomed at LBS by a purple ape-hangered Harley with a teeny sidecar attached to it.

    IMG_2132.jpg

    IMG_2134.jpg

    IMG_2135.jpg

    Eyecatching. But I cannot imagine it’s a good ride. The armpits will stay fresh, though.

    Ad is busy with the leading link front fork. He drops his work and welcomes me. “Coffee?”

    We chat for an hour about all kinds of things, mainly motorbikes and sidecars. Wheel sizes, ABS and traction control problems. Ad explains in a way so I can follow him. We look for a nice leather sports chair. I found a beautiful seat on the internet from a total lossed Aston Marton Vantage.

    IMG_2817.jpg

    These chairs come from this car:

    IMG_2818.png

    Ouch, that hurts.

    Ad calls the company. They cost € 1.500 each. O no, wait, that’s the old price. Here’s the actual price: € 2.000 each. Whàt?! My first car costed 1/3rd of that! It was kind of not entirely roadworthy, but hey, it was a complete car. So no way I’ll pay that kind of money for only one chair.

    Now I have my eyes on a Ford Mustang chair. Pretty. Leather. Iconic. Affordable.

    Adjustments.jpg

    They are kind of old and maybe a bit too big. I’ll keep browsing for some time.

    I take a look at the work Ad has been doing on my bike. He has made the frame on the bike.

    IMG_2141.jpg

    IMG_2142.jpg

    IMG_2148.jpg

    Now he started working on the front fork

    IMG_2145.jpg

    This pic reminds me of something… What does it look like? Wait, I know…
    After half a minute the braincells jump into place:

    IMG_1151.jpg

    Walrus! Spitting image!

    Ad and I go see the sidecar. He had the wheel housing widened.

    IMG_2137.jpg

    IMG_2153.jpg

    He doesn’t like what they did to the lower part. It has a downward orientation. It should be more sporty, so Ad will get his saw and saw it off. OK, you do that, Ad. I’m sure it’ll look better.
    He doesn’t like the front lights, either.

    Adjustments.jpg

    It’s só Seventies, he says. Well, Ad, we’re both from the Sixties, the Seventies is the decade we grew up in. Nothing wrong with that, right? He looks at me in horror. No, the lights have to go.
    He will make a pretty enduro-like frame on the sidecar and will mount the front lights on that. Better!

    We discuss the paint job. I want the sidecar to match the bike. Not too much tra-la-la. Just the pretty fresh color scheme, mainly black with a white and orange logo and an orange frame. I want the bike and sidecar to be united. So KTM will say: why didn’t we think of this ourselves?

    Ad thinks he will finish the rough built in three weeks. After that: finetuning, racks, electronics, paint-job, seat, cover and the technical inspection by the Dutch authorities.

    And what about those cases? Painting them black will cost € 300 each. I’ll buy new black ones.

    But I had some fun time picking those stickers off. I’ll do that again any time.

    After two entertaining hours I drive back home. In the meantime Ad works on the leading link and sends me a photo. Another step closer to the finish.

    ffd900bb-2c8c-4856-b522-f36a97bc1020.jpg
    #12
  13. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Oddometer:
    8,995
    Location:
    Tacoma - ish, WA
    I never understood the appeal of ape hangers. Now I do. Thanks! "Fresh armpits." :rofl
    #13
  14. TouringDave

    TouringDave Tri Moto Veritas

    Joined:
    May 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    7,284
    Location:
    Frankston, Vic, Aust.
    :lurk
    #14
    ktmtraveler likes this.
  15. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Why is it that time feels like being stretched to the max while waiting? I mean: waiting for the traffic light to turn green seems long, but is just an average half minute. Waiting for the water to cook takes a few minutes, but seems like half an hour. It seems like the worse the situation, the longer the wait. Waiting till 7 am when it’s your 6th birthday and your parents definitely forbid you to get up earlier than that: 2 days. In the waiting room at the dentist for a probably very painful procedure: a week. Waiting for the vet when your dog seems to be choking: a month. Waiting for the firemen when the house is on fire: three-and-a-half months. I know from experience.

    Waiting for your new sidecar: five months.

    (I know this is much less bad than my house being set on fire, but that’s almost 20 years ago and time can be healing, too.)

    O, wait: it actually ís five months now since I brought my 1190 Adventure R to LBS.

    So, where are we standing with this built?

    Front wheel with leading link: almost done.

    IMG_2198.jpg


    Sidecar frame: done

    IMG_2190.jpg

    IMG_2185.jpg



    Rear wheel plus tire: done

    IMG_2194.jpg


    Sidecar put into place: done. Sidecar wheel plus tire: done.

    3bea2e94-ba1c-4deb-8645-e7109b724ed5.jpg


    Looks kinda realistic, right?

    I’m happy with the looks. It looks more robust than I thought. The sidecar is bigger than it seemed in Ad’s workshop.

    I paid Ad’s workshop a visit today.

    First the usual hour or so we talk about everything but motorbikes. This time about being a step-parent. Ad and I both don’t have children, and we both have a partner who has kids. O, by the way, if Jan’s kids or grandkids call me their step(grand)mother, I will feed them poisoned apples. That’s what stepmoms do. They call me Rianne. That’s my name.

    We also talk about our parents. Ad’s dad is still alive, my mom too. They’re both over 80. I tell him that my 81 year old mom has her motorcycle license. She got that in the Fifties. That was very unusual back then in the Netherlands, for an 18 year old girl to get both her car and motorcycle license. Her dad, my grandfather, was a real petrolhead, and for him it was totally normal that his daughter got all the licenses she wanted.

    She does not ride anymore, but seems to like my bikes. Here’s the grand old lady on my 950 hack:

    IMG_0002.jpg


    My grandfather had an Indian motorbike back in the roaring twenties. Don’t know what type. The only photo I ever saw of that bike got lost in a fire two years ago.

    Back to the KTM.

    So, the rough built is finished. Now the styling details are to be discussed. We walk around the hack and talk things through. Ad makes some rough sketches on the sidecar. Later today I showed these pics to the two youngest grandkids. They were wondering if those drawings could be removed…

    Frame on the front: orange powdercoating, not to girly, but tough, following the sidecar model.

    IMG_2202.jpg


    Jerrycan on the left side:

    IMG_2208.jpg


    Protective bar/frame on the back. Exact shape to be determined:

    IMG_2203.jpg


    Frame on top of the back:

    IMG_2206.jpg


    Then the colors:

    The spraypainting job will mainly be black, with the Adventure R logo in white and orange. Together with the orange frame it will match the bike. We leave the details to Ted, the spraypainter. He’s an artist. He even can put Van Gogh’s sunflowers on a bicycle.

    IMG_2949.jpg


    Next, we move on to the seat. Well, as long as it’s more comfortable than the one on the Van Gogh bike. That looks like torture.

    Ad found a seat that fits perfectly:

    IMG_2209.jpg


    With the top part of the sidecar it fits even better:

    IMG_2214.jpg


    Yup. Seat’s good.

    What about the screen?

    IMG_2215.jpg


    Way too high, in my opinion. Looks like a Goggomobil, Ad. Don’t you think?

    A what?

    A Goggomobil, Ad. Or a Messerschmitt.

    Ad doesn’t know this three wheeled monstrosity from the Sixties. My neighbor back then had one.

    It looks like this:

    Adjustments.jpg


    Or this:

    IMG_2951.jpg


    Ad is convinced. Screen should be lower. “I’m going to work on that this afternoon.”

    Late in the afternoon he sends this picture:

    32cf3f7b-6243-4cf6-aa24-45c6664ee097.jpg


    Way better. As always, besides the technical wizardry, he knows exactly what is good looking.

    It’ll take another few weeks to finish. End of May, we think. Six weeks, that will feel like 6 months.

    Yes! I did manage to write this post without mentioning Covid-19! Almost.
    #15
  16. claude stanley

    claude stanley Claude

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2018
    Oddometer:
    374
    Location:
    pa
    Beautiful.....you are in good hands for sure.
    #16
    Flyin' Monkeys and ktmtraveler like this.
  17. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Sneak preview:

    bddbde60-65d4-4c94-8492-0a17a3dde3c4.jpg

    9fbba19b-cc24-4269-a449-0fc54fd4aea3.jpg

    These are the only photos I have right now. Will visit LBS next week to see the newborn in real life!

    We’re very close to the finish.
    #17
  18. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    The home stretch: lining, a flat and no shocks at all

    We took the two KTM hacks and rode to LBS this morning. On that tiny 35 mile stretch we encounter ten roundabouts. For reason of lowering the amount of traffic lights, some smartypants road design joker thought twenty years ago it was a good idea to make roundabouts on every intersection. It sure has lowered the amount of traffic lights.

    And it has made the road a bit more pleasant. Within twenty miles from our house we have the following variation of very artistic roundabouts (some of them I already posted on various platforms):

    IMG_0551.jpg

    IMG_0556.jpg

    Adjustments.jpg

    IMG_0522.jpg

    IMG_0523.jpg

    IMG_0567.jpg

    Adjustments.jpg

    Ain’t that fun? Some of these, actually won prizes. Yeah, there’s a Roundabout Competition overhere. My favorite is the Road Rage Consequence on top.

    That dragon has a historical connotation: it is located near the town of Beesel. In that town there is an Open Air Play on the courtyard of the local castle every seven years telling the story of St George and the dragon. At least since 1736, with some changes over the years. Almost every inhabitant of the tiny town plays a part or has another kind of role in the play: making props or clothes or doing hair and make up. It’s a big happening and it attracts a few thousand spectators. As a rule, the role of St George and other main parts have to be played by people born in Beesel. The only professional involved is the director. All the others are locals.

    Every seven years another director interprets the St George myth, so it’s always a surprise what will happen. Real animals are involved: a shepherd and sheepdog plus herd of sheep walk around, a cousin of ours is there with her horses. Goats and dogs run around. But it’s a little disappointing that they can never lay their hands on a real dragon. It looks frightening, it breezes fire, it growls and shakes it’s head and moves all over the place. On wheels.

    IMG_3101.jpg


    I’ve seen the play twice, in 2009 and 2016, and enjoyed it both times.

    So, that’s the story behind the dragon on the roundabout. During the week of the Open Air play, it actually breezes fire. No myth. I saw that myself driving home after the play.

    On the tenth roundabout today, we turn right to the extremely tiny little town of Elsendorp, where we pass the house of Ad Donkers and just a few hundred yards further there’s his workshop. We park the hacks.

    IMG_2345.jpg


    We see the new bike standing outside. With frame, no chair.

    Some pics of the construction:

    IMG_2335.jpg

    IMG_2334.jpg

    IMG_2333.jpg

    IMG_2332.jpg


    Ad is experiencing some trouble with the delivery of the Ohlin shocks:

    IMG_2342.jpg


    And some problems with the tubeless construction of the sidecar wheel:

    IMG_2343.jpg


    Yup, got my first flat without riding one single yard.

    He’ll take care of both.

    Furthermore, we experience some corona trouble with the Inspection Authority. They were closed for about two months. And they have some regulations now, so that inspection will take two days. We promise Ad to take the hack ourselves to the testing circuit. Then he saves time and money and can work on other people’s sidecars. He is very busy, always working on at least three projects at the same time. No personnel, anymore. He makes long hours, doing what he loves doing.

    At the moment, on the contrary, he’s doing with my sidecar what he hates the most: lining it:

    IMG_2338.jpg

    IMG_2337.jpg


    I offered him to do that myself, but he doesn’t want that. He tried talking me out of it, some time ago, but no. Sorry Ad, I want it lined. Finishing touch. He definitely agrees, but I know he hates doing it. Almost finished. Hold on.

    I definitely like what I see.

    Adjustments.jpg

    IMG_2353.jpg

    Smile for me, Ad!

    IMG_2362.jpg



    Ad doesn’t like the two different little lights in front. I agree with him. They should be the same. According to him, that’s not possible within the dutch regulations. Maybe he has a solution. I think he will spend some time browsing the internet to find a light that matches better.

    After the dreaded lining work, he needs to reassemble, put a 12V outlet on it, test the wiring again (it works fine), make a test ride, make some minor corrections (I guess) and wait for the inspection. He will probably add some KTM 1190 adventure orange “R” decals on a few spots (not too many).

    I mean this “R”:

    Adjustments.jpg


    I like the slender look of the Ott Euro 3 sidecar. By making some minor changes, widening the wheel housing and lowering the screen, he gave the sidecar a totally new and sporty look. Together with the sleek no fuzz paintwork it matches the bike, like I wanted.

    I saw on the internet this pic of another Ott Euro 3 sidecar.

    IMG_3105.jpg


    I really have to take a good look to notice it’s the same.

    O, and when it’s ready, he will give me an advanced -knife between the teeth- sidecar riding training. I probably won’t be able to win the Hungarian off road sidecar contest, like Ad did twice (with his Harley , no joke). But it never hurts to upgrade skills.

    We were planning to go to Scandinavia for about two months this summer. Denmark, Sweden and Finland up, tap North Cape, and Norway down. No go. Closed borders. Maybe next year. Maybe later.

    We will ride circles in our sweet little (hardly 100 by 200 miles) country. We might get dizzy after two months.
    #18
  19. twintwin

    twintwin Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Oddometer:
    895
    Location:
    NL
    Your talent as a storyteller, mix with these magnificent photos, make your post so enjoyable to read. And indeed, after living 4 years in the Netherlands, I never get dizzy, visiting this amazing sweet little country, so much to visit and discover. Cannot wait to be introduced in person to this new beautiful rig. Congratulations and thanks again for sharing your exiting built.
    #19
    ktmtraveler likes this.
  20. ktmtraveler

    ktmtraveler Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Oddometer:
    262
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Thanks for your kind words, @twintwin. We’ll meet for sure to exchange new hack-experiences!
    #20