One-way KLX250 - Dili to Denpasar (maybe)

Discussion in 'Asia' started by spacekadet, Jun 25, 2016.

  1. spacekadet

    spacekadet Been here awhile

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    I'm always reaching out to Asian rental companies to see who will allow one-way and even international rentals. There's not many, but there are a few. I'm doing Vietnam / Cambodia / Laos this October on a rented Pegasus 250 enduro.

    I've shipped my own bike a couple of times, but for an "annual leave" trip, the cost is really prohibitive.

    Anyway I've found a company in Bali that is willing to rent me a KLX250 one way to Kupang (West Timor / Indonesia), maybe even East Timor. For now I'm assuming I will have to get is shipped back to Bali, and I've got that covered if I need it.

    This is an early enquiry for travel about a year from now: anybody interested in picking up the return rental from Dili to Bali? If you've ever tried to arrange this, you will know it is super hard to source a bike. This would save me the cost of return shipping.

    There's plenty of things that could wrong with this proposal, I just want to see if anybody is interested to begin with.

    Logistics
    * The bike would have Indonesian registration. I believe this would make the border crossing from East Timor to West Timor straightforward, and no carnet would be needed (there's $400 saved straight away). I prefer to ride the other direction. it is possible to get into East Timor without a carnet, but it's not straightforward.

    * We would have to figure out some arrangement for payment to the rental company and liability. I can imagine they would not be keen to let you take delivery of the bike without meeting you. Maybe you would have to pay a pretty fat deposit - I don't know.

    * A lot of people end up "buying" their own bike in Indonesia for this trip. What they don't realise is that they are not the legal owners and they are not insured. It is not legal for foreigners to own a motor vehicle in Indonesia (not even expats who have a work visa). So those happy, beaming bloggers who post pictures of "their scooter" .. well, actually it's not!

    * Engine compression of the KLX is technically too high to run on 88 RON "Pertamina", which is all you can get outside of cities in Indonesia. It should be run on 91 RON "Pertamax", but you absolutely cannot get that in the villages and rural areas. Consequently you would need to ride conservatively to avoid getting serious engine damage. I don't know who pays for that if it happens - one of many details to discuss.
    #1
  2. elnonio

    elnonio shedding n00bness

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    I owned my motorcycle outright in Indonesia, and had it insured. Insurance company paid a claim. Not sure what you are talking about.

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    #2
  3. spacekadet

    spacekadet Been here awhile

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    http://www.expat.or.id/info/buyingacar.html


    "1. Valid Passport and ITAS or ITAP (for foreigner), or KTP (Kartu Tanda Penduduk/Identity Card) for an Indonesian. As a foreigner, if you do not have an ITAS /ITAP, you cannot legally own a car in Indonesia. As long as the person has a valid ITAS and a letter from the sponsoring company - they are allowed to purchase a vehicle in their name."
    #3
  4. gavo

    gavo Slacker

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    :lurk
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  5. elnonio

    elnonio shedding n00bness

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    Ah, yes, let's trust a web site instead of someone who has actual first hand experience after living there. Fine by me. I guess the part of the two posts that contradict each other can be overlooked: it is not legal for foreigners to own, v. Passport plus itas/itap.


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  6. VACommuter

    VACommuter Long timer

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    Maybe because you were there as military under orders different rules applied? I know you always follow the rules. (except for riding your DRZ down those steps one time....) One of my peeps just got back from Dili/Timor Leste. Supporting Pacific Partnership 16 and the Mercy's port visits.
    VAC
    #6
  7. elnonio

    elnonio shedding n00bness

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    Shhhhh...that never happened....

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  8. deaninkl

    deaninkl Been here awhile

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    I lived in Indonesia from 1981 till 1990, when I bought my first bike there the dealer registered the bike for me in their own name. I didn't think to much about it. at that time you didn't need seperate insurance, the insurance was covered in the "plat nomor" or number plate which then you had to replace yearly. My second bike was in my own name. Again the dealer just did it, I didn't ask if legal or not, but my name is clearly a foreign one.

    My experience of Indonesia is anything is possible, I also was able to get a driving licence for car and bike in Palembang in 1981, took me all of 30 minutes. Indonesia is a place where you simply have to try. Every rule can be circumnavigated.
    #8
    DuaKembara likes this.
  9. TUX

    TUX Geek on two wheels

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    Hey man...this might be of interest...did you get any takers?.....Also what's the rental outfit in Bali that do the KLX?

    Cheers
    John
    #9
  10. spacekadet

    spacekadet Been here awhile

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    So here I am again, best part of a year later...

    I could not get a rental happening. Not even one way. There is a nice dude in Bali (Moto Adventure) who gave it a good try, but by the time I paid him full value deposit and rental including 30 days freight back from Dili, it was going to be over $10k up front. For a 3 week trip, obviously not viable.

    So I have "bought" my own bike, a Yamaha Scorpio 225. It's actually my friend in Surabaya who is the legal owner ... a small technicality! I'm having it fitted out with luggage racks at this moment (soft pannier, tail rack and front-mount racks). I'm setting up for 2-up touring with plenty of generic soft luggage mount points.

    Back to my original offer, if anybody wants to ride it back to Bali, or anywhere else, I'm open to offers. It lives in Surabaya and has to get back there eventually. I'm leaving Dili on 9 July. The bike has to be gone by then. It will have papers permitting return to Indo. I'm like the rental guy - not willing to risk loss or damage without holding a suitable deposit and getting a fair return for it, so there would have to be $ involved!

    It's not an obvious choice but the Scorpio has a few things going for it. Performace wise, it gets to 80 quite quickly and will wind up to about 120, although not two-up with luggage. It has a range of around 350 km, and it even has a fuel gauge. It also has a centre stand, which is very handy for ferry travel. The 18 inch front wheel and 130 mm of fork travel are comparable to the Versys 300, which weighs 35 kg more. However the Versys does have twice the power :(

    Anyway, choice of bikes over 200cc is limited in Indo. I gave up on the idea of an enduro because it just doesn't work for two-up. I rode one solo 2,400 km in Indochina last year and couldn't wait to get off it. Rider seating on the Scorpio is comfortable. I'll let you know what Mrs says about the pillion seat later.
    #10
  11. spacekadet

    spacekadet Been here awhile

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    PS I forgot to subscribe to this thread and didn't get pinged about the earlier posts regarding ownership. I see there's some info about foreigners who live and work there .. sure. But what has that got to do with going there to do a trip? Seriously out of context folks!
    #11
  12. andyhol

    andyhol volcano rider

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    I'm very interested to here how you get on taking the Scorpio out of indonesia. I just brought a 250 rally and tried very hard to get in registered in my name but to no avail.
    Make sure you visit wae rebo in flores and stay up there for at least 1 night, it's amazing.
    Ferry from larantuka to kupang is simple enough no need to book. Just turn up and pay, make sure you go for a bunk bed.

    Your choice of bike is a solid one either that or the Honda tiger, best bikes in indo for the real world.
    #12
  13. dpouwel

    dpouwel Petualang

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    I'm Indonesian, technically you need KITAS or KITAP to buy motorbike/car if you are foreigners.

    But practically you doesn't need too if you buy used one

    When you buy used bike in Indo make sure you get these papers: BPKB (Vehicles Proof Ownership), STNK (Vehicles Registration Number Card), Blank Invoice with Rp6,000 revenue stamps attached and copy of KTP (Citizen Identity Number) who owned the vehicles first time or as listed in BPKB and STNK.

    As long as you hold all those papers you are the legal owner of the vehicles even your name not listed there. Normally, we Indonesian only bring STNK for daily driver (in case police officer asking it) and keep BPKB and blank invoice home.

    I hope this information helps
    #13