Oregon to Ushuaia on an XR650L

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Ulyses, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. Dorian

    Dorian huge carbon footprint

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    Bravo! After picking away at your wonderful ride report for the last week I just finished. Book or movie deal in the works? Inspiration/motivation speaking tour? :deal Whatever you end up doing for a job/career, they'll be lucky to have you!

    Guess I'll keep my old, outdated 650L and pile some more miles on it. A testament to the durability of the Honda and you in more ways than one!

    Well done sir :clap

    All the best!
    - Dorian
  2. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Thank you! Glad to see someone reading this thing a year later! Where are you at in Washington?
  3. Dorian

    Dorian huge carbon footprint

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    Just north of you; Olympia
  4. mach1mustang351

    mach1mustang351 Long timer Supporter

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    Ulyses,

    I checked out the link to this ride report in a thread about where you would ride if you had 6 months and $25,000. My answer was to ride Canada and Lower America (I live in Alaska) because the logistics of out of country travel scare me. Over the last week I read your whole thread and it was an absolutely inspiring read. I have had my eyes opened to how possible and amazing leaving the "comfort zone" could be.

    If you ever head north to Alaska hit me up and we can do a tour of the micro breweries in the state (we have some awesome IPAs).

    Thank you so much for making your ride and reporting on it.
  5. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Thanks for reading! Glad to see people still straying to this RR....haha! Hope you do make it down south eventually! If I ever get up North, I'll hit you up!
  6. advmoto66

    advmoto66 Ride On!

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    I've been reading quite a few RR to gather info for a tour thru CA and SA hoping to join my two older brothers leaving fall 2015. Thanks for taking the time to share some great story telling sprinkled in with your unique perspective. Bravo... Ride On!!!!:clap
  7. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    No worries! Thanks for reading! Good luck next year, it'll be here before you know it!

    P.S., What bike are you going to ride?
  8. thisguy72

    thisguy72 Still Waves To Scooters

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    I hadn't ridden in a while and was looking for an escape when I found your thread. I could go on and on, but I think the best thing is just to tell you that I really enjoyed it. Thanks for sharing.
  9. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Thanks!
  10. ckurowic

    ckurowic Been here awhile

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    Another new reader here, fantastic write up. Thanks for putting so much time into this.
    :clap
  11. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    You bet! I'm moving to Portland next week; looks like we'll be neighbors!
  12. ckurowic

    ckurowic Been here awhile

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    Cool man! I'd like to buy you a beer, from one vet to another when you have some time :freaky
  13. doc_ricketts

    doc_ricketts Thumper jockey Supporter

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    Great fun report and you are right:
    Bailing wire (galvanized if possible), zip ties( big and small), and duct tape (Gorilla best).
    I never go anywhere, even in my pickup or jeep without it and tell everyone I can fix anything with those three tools.
  14. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    A few inmates who are heading south this year asked me where they should stay.....so, I went back through the S. America portion and copied all hotel/hostel/camping information that I could find. I figured I would post it on here just in case anyone wanted some good (or not so good) places to stay. Hope it helps!

    Places to Stay and Highlights in S. America:

    1.) First off, do yourself a favor and buy the Lonely Planet guide to S. America. They will have good hotel/hostal information for all of the major cities and a lot of the medium sized ones. Buy it in ebook form and keep it on your phone or kindle or whatever you have. That way you won't waste a lot of space carrying a paper book. I found a lot of places to stay from that book. Definitely worth it.

    2.) Second, get some sort of mapping software for you GPS. I used the opensource maps that are free online. The link is here: http://garmin.openstreetmap.nl/

    These maps are routable and have a bunch of waypoint for fuel and lodging. Oftentimes I found hotels/hostals/campgrounds by just riding around and checking out the places listed on my GPS. If they are listed on opensource, chances are travelers have used them and they are decent.

    Finally, here are some of the highlights of where I stayed with the corresponding links from my blog for the time I stayed there.

    *Also, I threw in a couple of the highlights of my trip. They are marked with the asterisk and highlighted in yellow.

    Colombia:

    Cartagena, Colombia: Mamallena's Hostel. I didn't actually stay here in Cartagena because they were full, but it's an option. Check out the hostals and hotels in Gethsemani area. I found one a few buildings down from mamallenas that let me park in their courtyard.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/turn-and-burn-for-panama-part-3.html

    Cartagena: Hotel San Rocque. This is where I stayed. I split it with another rider because it was expensive. AC, wifi, and parking in the courtyard.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/cartagena.html

    Sincelejo, Colombia. In between Cartagena and Medellin: Don't stay at this place unless you are feeling rich. American prices and american amenities. I met several americans from the state department here. I only stayed here out of necessity:
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/back-on-road-in-colombia.html

    Medellin, Colombia: Buster's British Pub. A must!!! Contact Al (inmate name: theturtleshead ) in advance and make sure he's got a room. Here's his thread on advrider: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=643580&page=6. You'll propbably also want to try and email him or the pub or even just give them a call. They only have a few rooms, so make an effort to reach out to him as far in advance as you can and get a spot. Even if you don't end up staying here, get in touch with this guy, he's got a load of information.

    [​IMG]

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/rough-road-to-medellin.html

    Medellin: other places to stay: there are a ton of hostels near the Shamrock. Most have secure parking. Stay at one of them if only for the proximity to the shamrock.

    Santa Rosa, Colombia: in between Medellin and Cali. Cool hotsprings here, can't remember where I stayed, but there were lots of little hotels and campgrounds in the area. Talk to Al. Limited wifi availability. http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/busted.html

    Cali, Colombia: Casa Blanca Hostel. This hostal is run by mike. He's a Scandinavian dude that lives in Colombia and runs a motorcycle rental place/hostal/bike shop. Cool dude, has lots of good info. http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/cali.html

    Pasto, Colombia: Just before the border with Ecuador. Hotel Koala Inn. No secure parking, but I found a parking garage a few blocks away. Reasonable price. http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2012/12/great-views-and-horrible-roads.html

    Ecuador:

    Cayambe, Ecuador: Hacienda Guachala. This is a really cool place to stay! It's an old hacienda from 1590. The rooms have wood fireplaces that burn eucalyptus wood. And it's about .5 mile from the Equator and the little monument that they have there. It's a little out of the way and kind of expensive, but worth it.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/new-years-at-equator.html

    Quito, Ecuador: Casa Bambu Hostel. Private rooms: $15, a bed in the dorm: $7. Plus, a private garage for the bikes. Plus, it's a really quiet, low key kind of place without a bunch of wasteoids making a rukus all night.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/bonfires-and-quito.html

    Banos, Ecuador. Hostal Casa Real; $15 for a private room with wifi, private bathroom, secure parking, hot water, and free breakfast. Couple of hot springs in this town.http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/welcome-to-jungle.html

    Alausi, Ecuador: Hotel Europa for $10. Secure Parking. This is the town where you can ride the "Nose of the Devel" Nariz del Diablo train. It's not really worth it. I'd skip it if i did it again. http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/just-another-day.html

    Cuenca, Ecuador: Hostel Casa Cuenca dorm bed for $8. Secure Parking. http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/nose-of-devil-cloud-riding-road-blocks_7.html

    Peru:

    Tambo Grande, Peru: I wouldn't go to this town if I were you. It's better to cross into Peru further east and go through the mountains. If you do end up here for some reason, there are only a few places to choose from. I stayed at the most expensive place and just camped in their yard for cheap. http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/onward-to-peru.html

    Huanchaco, Peru: This is a great staging town for Canon del Pato, a must ride road! Seriously, you've got to ride this road. Al will tell you all about it. In Huanchaco I stayed at Nay Lamp Hostal. Cheap camping, wifi, secure parking in a huge garage. Huanchaco is a cool beach town. If you want to chill on the beach for a while, this is a good place.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/back-in-desert.html

    *Canon del Pato: One of the best roads of the ride! It follows an old railroad bed up a steep canyon. Awesome dirt road with tons of tunnels carved straight out of the rock.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/from-canyon-of-duck-to-struck-by-truck.html

    Huaraz, Peru: Jo's Place. Secure Parking, wifi. Camping if you want. After you ride the Canon del Pato, you can stay in Huaraz. It's a cool mountain town up in the Andes. There is even a brewery owned and operated by an American Expat. He makes a killer IPA. One of the few that I had on the trip. I was here in the rainy season, but there are some awesome hikes up here.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/from-canyon-of-duck-to-struck-by-truck.html


    Lima, Peru: Hitchhikers Backpackers Hostel, Miraflores District. This is a great place to stay. Lots of overlanders stay here. I met a couple of American couples in trucks that I met again later in Patagonia. They have a courtyard for secure parking, wifi, laundry, etc. Here is their website: http://www.hhikersperu.com/# Miraflores is the really nice neighborhood in Lima. This would be a good place to stash your bike if your girlfriend flies down to see you in Peru. I also stayed in a Hotel in the Barranco District, but I can't remember the name. The hostel is your best bet.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/moto-parts-in-lima.html

    Nazca, Peru: The Nazca Inn. Run of the mill hostel. Secure parking inside the building. Laundry, wifi, etc. I just drove around till I found this one. I think it was on my GPS. If you want to see the Nazca Lines, spend the money on a fly over. There is a little watchtower outside of town that you can see a few of the lines form, but it doesn't do it justice.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-nazca-lines.html

    Arequipa, Peru: "Hostal Sumay Wasy". The room is nice, the wifi works (sometimes), they have parking for one or two bikes in the entry way, and they have showers with lukewarm water. That's about all you can ask for. The Hostal is a block or two from the Cathedral. Lot's of cool stuff to see in Arequipa, including the ice mummies. Good staging city for Colca Canyon as well.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/change-of-plans-im-going-to-arequipa.html

    Cusco, Peru: Kokopelli Hostel. Cool place, get the bunks in the nice dorm. They have privacy curtains, power outlets, little lockers in your in your bunk. Nicest dorm bunks I stayed in on the trip. Secure parking inside their building.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/longggg-dayyyy.html

    *The backdoor into Machu Pichu: If you go see Machu Pichu from Cusco you have a few options. You can take the train for a couple $100....or, you can do it the awesome way and drive one of the most awesome roads on the trip to a little town called Santa Theresa/Hidro electrico.. This is the "backdoor" into machu Pichu. Check out the write up here: http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/cusco.html

    Also, at the bottom of this post is a slightly better write up with pictures and maps to explain how the Santa Theresa/Hidroelectrico route works:
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/machu-picchu_8406.html

    Agua Caliente, Peru: This is the little tourist trap of a town that you have to go through to get to Machu Pichu. You can't ride your motorcycle here. The only way to get in is by Train or hiking. I can't remember where I stayed....it doesn't really matter though. Everything is priced about the same. Just walk around until you find a decent place. I hated this little town.

    Somewhere on the Alitplano between Cusco and Lake Titicaca: If you are riding with some other folks or just feel like doing a little rough camping, you can always just find a little pasture or secluded spot off the road and rough camp. It's free! I can't remember the exact location of this campsite, but it was badass. Here are the blog posts that give you a rough idea of where we camped:
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/flat-tires-and-stealth-camping.html

    and
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/01/peru-to-bolivia-crooked-cops-and-lake_8166.html

    Bolivia:

    La Paz, Bolivia: Hotel Oberlander: pretty expensive, especially for Bolivia, but the camping is cheap. Also, Great wifi, hot showers, good food, sauna, Jacuzzi, pool, the works. Also, a communal kitchen. One of the nicest places I stayed. Worth it.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/dodging-llamas-on-bolivian-altiplano.html

    Potosi, Bolivia: Hostal Compania de Jesus; they have solid wifi and charge 90 Bolivianos for a "doble" (room with double beds) which works out to 45 Boliviano or about $6 apiece
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/dodging-llamas-on-bolivian-altiplano.html

    Unuyi, Bolivia: Can't remember where I stayed here, but I remember that I found it on the Lonely Planet guide. It was a hotel and they had secure parking around back. There are a few places to stay here; it's a big tourist town. Everyone is here to see the Salar.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-salar-de-unuyi.html

    *Salar de Unuyi/Lagunas Route: the three days of riding in the Salar and Lagunas
    was probably the best part of the trip for me. If the Salar is relatively dry, you should ride across it and then jump into the Lagunas Route. If it is flooded, then just go take some pictures of it and then ride the Lagunas Route. You can actually do this route without camping (there are some little hotels out in the middle of nowhere that you can stay at) but I recommend camping if you can. And don't forget to go to the Aduana at the Mining camp out in the middle of nowhere and get your motorcycle paperwork done! We missed it and had to bribe the cops at the Bolivia/Chile border to get out of the country. I think I still have my GPS route somewhere....if you want the tracks for your GPS let me know and I'll try and find them and email them to you. Here are the write ups:

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/bolivia-to-chile-via-lagunas-route-day-1.html

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/bolivia-to-chile-via-lagunas-route-day-2.html

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/bolivia-to-chile-via-lagunas-route-day-3.html


    Chile/Argentina:

    Things get a little erratic from here. I did lots of camping and didn’t always write down where I stayed or camped. I did record some of the GPS lat/longs for some campsites. They are both safe countries. It's also expensive as shit in Chile. Hence the camping. There is also a big camping culture in Chile and Argentina, so there are lots of cheap municipal campgrounds in the small towns. I found a lot of them through the GPS waypoints on the open source maps.

    San Pedro de Atacama, Chile: this is where you end up after the Salar/Lagunas route. I stayed in a hotel one night and a campground the other. Can't remember the names, but look in the Lonely Planet guide. Prices are high! I recommend camping. Great way to meet the locals.

    Taltal, Chile: I camped on the beach just north of town. Awesome spot.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-atacama.html

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/stealth-camping-101.html

    Huasco, Chile: Camped at: (-28.41573, -71.19815). One of the coolest little stealth camps I did on the trip. After I cleared out the trash and broken bottles.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/stealth-camping-101.html

    Los Villos, Chile: Camped at a campground on the beach. It was more expensive than I had planned on. I think I found it by looking at signs on the PanAmercian Highway. This far south in Chile, the PanAmerican is like an American Freeway.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/cruising-panamerican.html

    Santiago, Chile: "Hosteling International", it's a Hostal. Great place. Secure parking was hard to find in Santiago. They have a huge secure gravel parking lot in the back yard where you can park.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/into-santiago.html

    Lake Vichuquen, Chile: Stealth camping in a tree farm: (-34.80185, -72.03659). Cool place. Me and an Aussie guy that I met at a gas station found this place. He was riding a DR650.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/new-faces-new-places.html

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/back-in-pnf.html

    Lota, Chile: municipal campground (-37.11664, -73.15027) that was listed on our GPS. It ended up only costing 500 Pesos (about $1.00) per person to camp there, so we stayed and took advantage of the bathrooms.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/back-in-pnf.html

    Pucon, Chile: Can't remember where I stayed here. It was a chilean holiday and everything was booked solid! Still, there are tons of places to stay...this is kind of a big tourist spot for chileans. Check the Lonely Planet guide.

    Bariloche, Argentina: Can't remember where I stayed. Big tourist town. Tons of hostals to choose from. Check lonely planet.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/bariloche.html

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/more-rain_21.html

    Gobenador Costa, Argentina: Municipal Campground. It was only $2. This is a small town in the middle of nowhere. Just ask where the campground is.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/hace-viento-no.html

    Fitz Roy, Argentina: I stayed in a little hotel, I think it was the only one in town. It was expensive but I was tired. There was a campground here too.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/riding-pampas.html

    Rio Gallegos, Argentina: I stayed in a couple of places here. I don't remember where exactly, I was dealing with some bike trouble and didn't write it down. I hated this town. Try and find the Hostal, it's the cheapest place in town.

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/400-miles-of-misery.html

    *Look up Manolito in Rio Gallegos. He's a local guy and speaks good English. He's on ADVrider and loves to meet riders as they pass through on their way to Ushuaia. Send him a PM. He'll show you around and help you out. Awesome guy!
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/problem-solvedtal-vez.html

    Rio Grande, Argentina: Ruta 40 Hostel. Cool place, small, not on the maps. Its right next to a icecream shop/tattoo parlor if I remember correctly. It's expensive but cool.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/02/tierra-del-fuego-land-of-fire-yeah-right.html

    Ushuaia, Argentina: I stayed in a Hostal the first couple of nights here. I think it was called Polar Bear or something, I don't remember, I was drunk from too much celebrating at the Irish Bar. There is also a campground at the local Ski resort that I stayed at. Plenty of places to choose from here.

    Punta Arenas, Chile: Don't recall where I stayed here either. There are lots of options. Look in Lonely Planet.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/escape-from-tierra-del-fuego.html

    *If you are having bike trouble or need new tires or chains, go see this guy:
    [
    url]http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/problemas-problemas-problemas_3266.html[/url]

    Also, you can sell your bike in Punta Arenas at the Zona Franca if you want to call it quits from here. I knew a couple of guys that did it.

    Puerto Notales, Chile: This is the staging point for Torres del paine. Places to stay:

    The Tin House. Cool little hostel. Really nice place, owned by an American woman and her chilean husband. Secure parking, wifi, great breakfast!

    Erratic Rock Hostel. This place is owned by some native Oregonians! It's a bit crowded and not as nice as the Tin House, but it's cool and they'll let you keep your bike in the back yard while you hike in Torres del Paine. They also rent hiking gear (backpacks, trekking poles, etc)
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/hiking-prep_14.html

    *Torres del Paine. Awesome hiking!!!!! Try and do the entire circuit if you can. If not, do the "W". Here is the start of my write up:
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/torres-del-paine-overview_14.html

    El Calafate, Argentina: Campground. Can't remember what it was called but they had a great BBQ place on site. Some friends stealth camped just out of town...so that's an option too.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/hello-ripio.html

    *Perrito Moreno Glacier: go see this glacier. Its iconic. El Calafate is the typical staging town.

    El Chalten, Argentina: I camped at a hostal here. Tons of places to camp or stay. Lot's of dirtbags here. Watch your stuff!

    *Fitz Roy and other hiking at El Chalten: tons of good hikes to do from here. I just staged at a campground in town and did a bunch of day hikes. Write up starts here:
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/hike-to-lago-torre.html

    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/fitz-roy-from-lago-de-los-tres.html


    Gobenador Gregores, Argentina: Can't remember where I stayed here. It was my birthday, i got a little drunk. This is a small town on Ruta 40. Camping is an option. There are a couple of hotels too.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/where-in-hell-is-gobenador-gregores-and.html

    Chile Chico, Chile: Campground. Can't recall the name. It was nice. They had wifi. It's near the lake.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/ruta-40-is-dying.html

    *Carretera Austral: You need to drive this road. It's like Alaska in Patagonia. Lot's of places to stealth camp. There are a few options for where you can start/finish.

    Coyhaique, Chile: Tourist town. Stayed in a hostal owned by some German guy and his family. Found it on Lonely Planet.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/03/carretera-austral-day-2.html

    Esquel, Argentina: Once again, can't remember where I stayed. It was a Hostal.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/04/final-day-on-carretera-austral.html

    Dolavon, Argentina: Municipal Campground. It's a small town. Just ask where the campground is or find it on your GPS. It was only a dollar or something.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/04/back-in-pampas.html

    Puenta Piramides, Argentina: Municipal Campground. This one was pricey! $12.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/04/back-in-pampas.html

    Las Grutas, Argeninta: Campground. There are tons of campgrounds and hostals. This is a big beach town. I stayed at a campground that was for cops on vacation. Just look on the GPS or check lonely planet.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/04/hay-pinguinos.html

    Coronel Pringles, Argentina: Municipal Campground. This one was co-located in the city park. Small town, just ask where the park/campground is.
    http://brycebissinger.blogspot.com/2013/04/las-grutas-to-coronel-pringles.html

    Buenos Aires, Argentina: Tons of hostals to choose from. Secure parking is hard to find...but....you can stash your bike at Dakar Motos. They have a few bunks that you can rent or you can just stash your bike there and find something downtown.

    *Dakar Motos: Sandra and Javier. They own the shop. They primarily do bike shipping. They also have some tires for sale and other odds and ends. These are the people to talk to about shipping your bike home. With Dollar Blue, flying your bike from Buenas Aires to the USA is probably the cheapest option.

    Uruguay.

    *There is a cool beach town called "Punta del Diablo" or something like that. It's only accessible with an offroad vehicle. I didn't go, but I heard it's a cool place.

    La Paloma, Uruguay: Hostelling International. It's a nice little hostal, only a few blocks from the beach.

    Colonia, Uruguay: this is where I took the ferry back to Buenos Aires. There is a campground or two and some hostals. I elected for a Hostal as it was raining.

    Hope this helps! I expect to repaid with awesome stories of your adventure!
  15. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,793
    Location:
    Seven Springs NC
    Hi,

    I hope I don't hijack your thread but Shamrock Irish Pub has been changed to Buster's British Bar under new management but with same owner, Al (theturtleshead on here). I believe they are still renting rooms, at least that's what Al told me when he was in early stage of renovating the pub.

    [​IMG]
  16. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,368
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    No hijack at all! Thanks for the update.

    I guess it's actually more fitting than an Irish pub. Wait, isn't Al Scottish?! I always thought it was kind of strange that an Scottish (or maybe Enlish?) guy owned an Irish pub in Colombia.:lol3
  17. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,793
    Location:
    Seven Springs NC
    :rofl I agree! :lol3
  18. strictlyJDM

    strictlyJDM Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Oddometer:
    175
    Location:
    SF Bay Area/Humboldt County
    First of all. Congrats on such a amazing ride. Such a life journey that you made, and got home in one piece. Even the bike made it too!

    I started your RR because I have a XRL and plan on doing the exact ride once the bike is ready and my finances allow me too. I started at page 1 like the most of us and caught myself getting through as many pages as possible in the wee hours of the night after work just before bed

    I want to thank you for such information as it will help many many riders just like me.

    P.S. - BRING A EXTRA CHAIN SLIDER!

    awesome awesome report! Hope your doing well as I know this ride was well over a year ago.
  19. JettPilot

    JettPilot ADV Rider

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,321
    Location:
    Miami, Florida - Motorcycle Hell
    Yes, it was great to read the list of parts he had to replace, as its impossible to get parts on the road sometimes. The chain slider was one I would have never thought of either. Given his list, I think I would bring 2 along, since they are light and don't take a lot of extra space when carried together !

    Mike
  20. strictlyJDM

    strictlyJDM Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2014
    Oddometer:
    175
    Location:
    SF Bay Area/Humboldt County
    Two chain sliders
    Oil filters
    Extra oil after those long highway rides
    Beef up your subframe before you head out
    Extra sprockets
    Maybe even a chain

    Extra parts should take up 5-10 liters of space which can be crucial