Oregon to Ushuaia on an XR650L

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Ulyses, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. JettPilot

    JettPilot ADV Rider

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    Ulyses,

    My theory is, light is good. I sat on a Yamaha Tenere and while it would be wonderful on the road, it was so big and heavy I would not be comfortable taking it through dirt roads, trails, and some of the out of the way places I would want to ride.

    I ride a XR650L and like it a lot, and if I ever get to do a trip like this, I think that is what I would take. If you had it to do over again, would you still take the XR650L ??? Any thoughts on this ???

    Mike
  2. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Actually, I wouldn't worry about the extra oil filters. They are pretty easy to find. Chain too. The rest of that stuff though....definitely bring that stuff. And probably a spare CDI just in case. Thanks for reading! Glad you enjoyed it!
  3. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Yeah, I'd do it again on an XR650L. I would probably try and make it even lighter though. I would definitely take soft luggage, less clothes, and lighter camping gear.

    I'd also love to do it on a Harley. Just for kicks.

    Really, you can do it on any kind of bike. Unless you hunt out dirt roads and trails, most of the trip is on pavement. Like they say, ride what you have. I was really focused on finding and outfitting the right bike before I left. Eventually though, I came to realize that it wasn't really important.
  4. WhicheverAnyWayCan

    WhicheverAnyWayCan Deaf Biker

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    With a straight & loud pipes? :rofl Or a quiet one?? :lol3
  5. junkyardroad

    junkyardroad Been here awhile

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    It nice to see this thread come up again! I first read this right as my life veered down an unexpected course. For whatever reason, this one grabbed my attention, and I waited for every post. I still revisit it from time to time.

    Thank you for compiling that list! You did my homework for me!
  6. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Oh, definetly loud pipes. Something really loud and obnoxious. Gotta let people know they need to get out of the way!
  7. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Thanks for the compliments! Glad you are planning on heading south in a couple of years. Good luck and god speed!
  8. ONandOFF

    ONandOFF more off than on

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    Thanks for compiling and posting that amazingly comprehensive list, Bryce.
    Que Dios le pague!
  9. dsloken

    dsloken n00b

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    Weak subframe on XR650L. I read your post. I have 08 As well and I had the same problem. I've had mine welded twice. Both times on a motocross track just goofing around.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  10. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Actually, it wasn't the subframe that gave me issues, it was that damn luggage rack! It broke 5 or 6 times! The subframe was golden!
  11. spacebro

    spacebro Adventurer

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    Wow, awesome list. I followed your ride report in real time, thoroughly enjoyed it. This summer I will do a similar trip. Thanks for compiling this list of resources, I'm sure I will use it.
  12. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    No worries! Thanks for reading!
  13. _cy_

    _cy_ Long timer

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    soooo .. did ya ditch those heavy ammo cans?
  14. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Yep! I ditched the Ammo Cans in favor of Pelican Cases in El Salvador. I also welded a ton of gussets to my luggage rack in Ecuador.
  15. Trip Hammer

    Trip Hammer It's not the years, it's the mileage Supporter

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    Ulyses!!! :clap I gotta say, this is one of those RRs that I go back and re-read. Whether I'm missing my bike because I chose not to ride to work in the miserable, freezing NW rain, or I'm yearnin' for some vicarious adventuring, this legendary ride never fails to satisfy. Big fan here!!:1drink

    David
  16. jfink

    jfink Can't get there from here

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    Yep, gussets is a word I believe they understand in South America. We had to have some in Uyuni, Boliva.
  17. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Thanks for the compliments man! I feel you on the miserable, freezing, NW rain. It's a chore riding up here sometimes...

    Thanks again!

    Bryce
  18. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Yeah, I needed to re-weld....the day after I left Uyuni! I was out in the Lagunas in the middle of nowhere and we came across a mining camp. They opened up their shop and welded my rack back together. It was a 150 miles from anywhere!
  19. Gravetter

    Gravetter Been here awhile

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    Wow, just finished reading the entire thing over a one month period. Absolutely enjoyed it, thank you very much for the great report, it's now one of my favorites.

    What jacket, pants and boots did you have? Were you happy with them?

    If you wanna get real crazy, what other gear did you have (tent, stoves, etc.) that you were happy or unhappy with?
  20. Ulyses

    Ulyses Long timer

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    Thanks for reading! I'll oblige:

    Riding Gear: Honestly, I didn't put a ton of thought into riding gear. I just bought all my motorcycle gear at a used gear store in Portland, OR. Nothing special there. I just kind of mixed and matched. I was just trying to save money. I bought the Jacket and pants for $300 total! The Jacket I had was a tourmaster. I'm not sure who made the pants. I also bought a cheap Fly helmet. For a rain shell I used my eVent backpacking rain shell. Same thing for rain pants. My boots were a pair of my old Marine Corps issued combat boots. They had a goretex lining. I did buy a brand new tourmaster electric vest before I left. That was one of the best things I purchased! For warm weather gloves I just used some fox motocross gloves with the carbon fiber knuckle guards. Cold weather gloves were my Black Diamond mountaineering gloves. Finally, in Colombia I purchased an Acerbis compression armor thing. That thing was a life saver in warm weather! If it got hot, I just put the jacket away and wore the armor.

    Jacket: tourmaster (unsure of model)
    Pants: who know? haha!
    Boots: Marine Corps combat boots (goretex)
    Electric vest: Tourmaster.
    Gloves: Fox motocross gloves, Black Diamond Guide Gloves
    Helmet: Fly (Unkown model)

    I had no complaints with my riding gear. Before this trip, I was mostly riding my Harley in T-shirt and jeans with a half-helmet, so the riding gear was new to me. I was used to being uncomfortable on the Harley, so even though my gear wasn't top notch, it was the best I had ever used! Haha!


    Other gear:

    Stove: MSR Dragonfly: this stove was awesome! It's a multi fuel stove, so you can run it on almost anything petroleum based. I ran it on gasoline straight from my gas tank. It's totally adjustable, so you can simmer with it or boil....I cooked a lot of good meals with it.

    Pots/pans: MSR Titanium 1L pot and MSR Titanium mug. I do a lot of backpacking/mountaineering, so having light titanium gear is a must. I love the MSR stuff. It's extremely light and durable. My pot and mug have been on countless trips, including Afghanistan, so it was a no brainer to bring them.

    GPS: Garmin 60CSX: I use this GPS for hiking/mountaineering too. I figured I would just save money and use this one instead of buying a fancy new model. It worked just fine.

    Sleeping Pad: Thermarest Z Lite: It's a simple, egg crate design sleeping pad. Cheap, light, and plenty comfortable for me. When I got to patagonia and things got a little colder, I just bought a second, cheap foam roll-up sleeping pad and doubled it up underneath the z lite.

    Tent: USMC issue, one-man tent. I'm not sure who makes this tent, but it was amazing! It folds up into the size of a dinner plate, deploys instantly, has a rainfly and vestibule, and can serve as a simple mosquito net without the rain fly. It was perfect. Alas, I've never seen a civilian version.

    Sleeping bag: REI 35 degree synthetic bag. This was just an old, small REI sleeping bag that I've had for years.

    SPOT emergency beacon: this was handy. It tracks your position, allows you to send "I'm okay" texts and emails to friends and family, and, in an emergency, hopefully it will allow you to call for help.

    That's about all I can think of. As you can probably tell, I didn't invest a ton of money in gear. I already have so much gear for my other hobbies that I decided it would be easier to just multi-purpose it and use it for the trip. Hope this helps! If you have any more specific questions, feel free to hit me up! Just remember, you can do these kinds of things with whatever you have lying around. You might not be styling or even remotely comfortable, but you'll be doing it cheaper. The trick is to just get tough! Haha!