Ossa tr280

Discussion in 'Trials' started by bohica53, Sep 26, 2020.

  1. 2whlrcr

    2whlrcr gooligan

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    16,182
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    Dubuque, Iowa
    It might be more fun just to throw the money out the car window and watch people scramble for it.
    #21
  2. UstaKood

    UstaKood Been here awhile

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    Michigan
    Any cherry trials bike under the hand of a smart person who takes care of things and isn't crashing and bashing repeatedly can ride a bike no longer made without issues, for a decade and never need a critical custom-to-that-manufacturer part. if a trials bike breathes clean air, I consider the top end to be permanent and maintenance free. That bike will need parts common to all trials bikes, but that's no issue. And there is a parts base out there. No big, but I'd bet one could - eventually - get any part needed.


    As always Bene , well said .

    On the other hand ...

    Maybe all they're worth is scrap .

    Hmmm ...

    If I could get one for nothing ....

    I've got a TY 175 ....

    Wonder if that would fit ? ( without hitting the front fender ? ) :hmmmmm

    Wait a minute .... !

    A TY 80 !!!

    DUDE !!!

    A YamaOssa !

    :bmwrider
    #22
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  3. bohica53

    bohica53 Adventurer

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    Jan 2, 2017
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    50
    Well I talked to Mike Komer and we agreed that even at an excellent price the Ossa was to much of a question mark. So..... I am now in a search for a Montesa 315r! If anyone wants to unload one.....let me know. Thks to all!
    #23
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  4. Norman Foley

    Norman Foley Devotee of the Husqvarna Supporter

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    The Ossa outcome of that I expected....
    #24
  5. sprinter27

    sprinter27 Adventurer

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    While aftermarket can source lots for a 315 , it’s been out of production and is a bastard Honda that will still give you fits for finding many of the spares . At least the one I owned did .
    #25
  6. Lotus54

    Lotus54 Ngana

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Port Angeles, WA USA
    I would certainly buy a newer OSSA. Newer the better. The starting is super easy to fix, engine is great and gearbox decent. So far, I have not had too much in the way of parts issues- although some things can be hard to find.

    I don’t particularly like the linkage bearing setup (they use teflon coated bushings) and linkage could be more robust.
    Injection is quite easy to work on- software is free and I’ve made a few of the interface.

    I know a 2013 for sale that has about 15 minutes running time. Dealer has it for sale.
    #26
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  7. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 49 years Supporter

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    FWIW some suspension bearings thoughts.

    Coated bushings can be viewed as inferior to needle bearings. I did too, but after living with them on the Shercos I prefer them because they are so easy to maintain. Sherco uses Teflon-coated bushings for the dog bones in their trials bikes. I found them super reliable and quiet when greased every season or two. But some riders do no maintenance on bikes many years ridden. They'll complain of creaking noises when the bike is sat on or ridden (a few drops of oil into the bushing will diagnose this). Those abused bushings survive fairly well, but eventually the low-friction surface coating will get wiped off.

    Journal bearings have a higher load capacity than needle bearings because of the much larger surface area of contact. Needle bearings have the advantage of rolling instead of sliding between the bearing surfaces, but the tradeoff is higher contact stresses. Lower bearing contact area is why you'll find needles laying side-by-side in suspension linkages. I've seen caged needle bearing in cheapo Chinese suspension bearing kits. Avoid those! They won't last. Uncaged needles can be a pain when doing maintenance if you have to clean them instead of just reapplying grease. In that case it pays to lay needles carefully into grease in the outer races after cleaning everything, and stick your tongue out just so :yum while lining all the needles up and hoping you haven't lost any:bluduh.
    #27
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  8. Lotus54

    Lotus54 Ngana

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    Yes, they do hold up pretty well- except when riding in lots of mud. There are no seals at all- so the mud gets in there and rapidly wears the teflon. At least that has been my experience. The good thing? Those bushings are super cheap, very small and light.
    I also broke parts of the linkage twice, so I went to a titanium setup, with grease fittings. I would push silicone grease with teflon after most rides, which (appeared to) push out any dirt/mud/water pretty well. Plus it was really quick to do.

    The bikes I’ve had with sealed needle bearings seem to hold up a lot better, although I agree if they seals fail, they are much more work to clean.
    #28
  9. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 49 years Supporter

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    Lotus54 you must slam into stuff pretty hard and often:pynd

    I've roasted some Gas-Gas dog bones, but often they were already somewhat abused before I got them. On the Sherco dogbones I have fit some o-rings to have a seal - any seal - but I ended up leaving them off and just re greasing them every season if I'm riding a lot. The full grease-packing acts like seals for long enough, but I must admit to living in a dryer part of the country and generally avoid slop-mud riding. Your locale, Port Angeles, WA isn't exactly dry country!

    Grease zirks are really nice for easy maintenance. I wish I could fit them everywhere but on the smallish trials bikes that's technically difficult as well as creates stress risers. Were your titanium bits the dogbones? That would certainly help.
    #29
  10. Vintage pro

    Vintage pro Been here awhile

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    Sep 26, 2013
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    295
    Location:
    Stallion Springs , Ca
    I built and modified the Ohlins on these bikes, took the standard Ohlins and would make another longer shaft to increase the travel.

    Attached Files:

    #30
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