OT- Any pilots in Denver?

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by Bad Wolf, Jan 1, 2019.

  1. winonarider

    winonarider Adventurer

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    Ha! That was fun. Figured the handle was already taken when I signed up.

    No idea about CAP. Back to 1993... I was looking into buying a share of a "cheap-ish" plane, rack up hours and then sell my share.
    Back then, supposedly flight instruction (multi) time was preferred to get on with a regional and not to do the single-engine plane share. I wasn't too excited about instructing then. My attitude has changed to where I think it would be fun now.

    Should be a fun journey for you! I enjoyed flight training. Glad the cost was a lot less back then too-it's quite a bit different these days.
  2. flybigjet

    flybigjet Remove Before Flight Supporter

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    As an example, at SkyWest, they call them "Lifer's".
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  3. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    So, first flight today in the Grumman Cheetah.

    Fun little plane. I did well, but need to work on finessing the flight controls and not being too reactive to gusts and over correcting. I didn't do too bad overall. My next scheduled flight is Tuesday, but so far weather forecasts aren't too promising. I have some time booked for Wed as well, and that looks clearer so I shouldn't miss a full week between flights.
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  4. youngan

    youngan -------

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    I work for an air taxi in Alaska, primarily flying turbine Otters on wheel-skis. I got my commercial ticket at age 45, and am now 55. I’ve worked with guys who are over 70. When I got into it, there was a glut of pilots, so you couldn’t get a job with a decent air taxi up there without at least 1000 hours. Fortunately, I had the hours, as a flew for 10 years in my own plane on a private ticket before getting my commercial. These days, with the pilot shortage, you can get jobs up there with around 300 hours. Might not be the dream job or the dream location, but it’ll get you in the door to start building experience and time towards the job you do want. That is if you want to go the Alaska air taxi route. Most guys on here seem more interested in corporate or airline, which is a very different path.

    Anyway, for the type of stuff I’m talking about I don’t see the age as being an impediment at all.
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  5. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism! It's a bad drug!

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    I have a couple friends (retired airline types) who retired to Alaska to continue their careers. Airline ups and downs and too many divorces required them to continue working. :( Might be fun for a season. But by the time the season was over, it would still be a four letter word.
  6. youngan

    youngan -------

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    The quality of that season depends a lot on who you work for. Many Alaska operators work their pilots seven days a week all summer, and fly them between 120 and 180 hours a month. They get around the rest and duty time rule of 13 days off per quarter because for many, the season starts partway through the second quarter, and ends partway through the third, meaning you got those rest days before and after your work season. The place I work for on the other hand gives us two consecutive days off every week, and we only fly about 60-80 hours per month. Also, we are paid salary, not by flight hours; we make very good money, and are not tempted to push weather just to get more pay.
    For me, it’s the dream job, as much so now as it was 10 years ago when I started. In fact, more so now, I’d say.
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  7. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism! It's a bad drug!

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    ^^^^ I've seen that. Great play on the rules that were put there for a reason. Like the rule of "1 day off in seven" (old part 121) that the bean counters and their lawyers butchered. It would be great to do that for a while. but at this point in my life, I would only want 3 days a week at most. I'm just not young enough anymore.
  8. winonarider

    winonarider Adventurer

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    Thanks for your insight!

    Right now, I'm leaning towards going the Alaska air taxi route and instructing when not up there. Should be good experience, no doubt.

    I'm sure I will have some questions down the line, but am probably a few months away from having a timeline figured out.

    Thanks again!
  9. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    Aren't the air taxi pilots only working four months of the year?
  10. youngan

    youngan -------

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    That’s true at many companies. Some are only 100 days. I work five months. There are a handful that work year-round. The operators out of Bethel, for example, and Kodak.
  11. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    Interesting. I might look at that, but being away from home for 3 months is a big bite to take. Although would work wonders for my hours accumulation.
  12. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    On the off chance anyone is in the area, I'm sested at Perfect landing.
  13. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    Today Stall training and slow flight. Doing well. I did drop the nose a little far on the first stall and attempted to pull up too fast, but got that out of my system.
  14. youngan

    youngan -------

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    Years ago, when I was first training in the turbine Otter, I once went for the full stall, vs. first indication. This thing has a huge, high-lift wing with a stall speed around 45 knots; at the same time, it’s carrying 900 hp on the nose. So getting it to actually stall requires an extreme angle of attack. When it finally broke, it snapped full nose down rather dramatically, and rolled a fair bit as well. Recovery went fine, but my instructor said “Well, that’s the wildest ride I’ve ever been on in an Otter...”
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  15. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    I haven't spun yet, but on my list sometime in the future.
  16. youngan

    youngan -------

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    Doing spins is valuable, for the respect they can teach you for not ending up there unintentionally, and how to recognize the onset. Of course, for some, they are also a lot of fun. I’m not one of those.
  17. Bad Wolf

    Bad Wolf High functioning sociopath

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    Considering the wife and I have been known to plan vacations around roller coasters....


    :clap


    But the Cheetah isn't spin rated, so I'll have to pick something else for that.
  18. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism! It's a bad drug!

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    ^^^^ very useful and necessary training. They shouldn't be scary. Just make sure you have a fwd CG. Even a plane certified for spins, can flat spin with an aft CG. Now that's scary...…………...


    Thoroughly understanding the aerodynamics and knowing what is to come will take fear out of it. But the first ones are always a bit uncomfortable. Just expect it to be.
  19. youngan

    youngan -------

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    They don’t frighten me, but they do make me want to hurl...
  20. AviatorTroy

    AviatorTroy Following my front fender

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    I used to enjoy teaching CFI students because I loved spinning my brains out. But there’s good reasons why it’s not taught to primary students. You need to know how to recover, but not how to start one intentionally. I used to demonstrate one to my primary students before they were signed off to go practice maneuvers solo. If they stall and drop a wing into an incipient spin I wanted them to know what it was going to look like and not be afraid of it. And even that was frowned upon at the time. I have no idea what the spin training consists of now, that was 25 years ago.

    As I recall the 152 spun very nicely, the 172 was only utility category with a very forward CG but I absolutely could not get it to spin when loaded that way.