PC's Adventures in Pictures

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by PC-Rider, Jan 2, 2010.

  1. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    So, being in Altoona we head for the world famous Horseshoe Curve.

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    A little bit out of town !

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    In my original route plan we were supposed to come through that tunnel which goes under the railroad tracks of Horseshoe Curve.

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    The trains come from both directions around this sharp curve to get up and over the Allegheny Mountains.

    Today the rails are not visible with the trees gown up next to the tracks.
    The arrow points to where trains would be going by ever half hour !

    This is the northern side of the curve.

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    As you can see, this is a very important historical landmark in our country.

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    We get inside the visitor center and we are told there are NO TRAINS coming through here right now and we don't know when they will resume.

    It turned out that while we were having our breakfast in Altoona this morning there was a train wreck in town that was blocking all of the rails leading to the curve from the east.

    :eek1

    :cry

    So, we were here, and I had never been here before and I wanted to see the curve, so we paid our $7.28 a piece and see what we can while we are here.

    Yes, $7 and some tax made for the .28 !

    The ticket was good for the whole day so we figured, how bad cold it be, we would just come back later.
    But they did not know when the trains would resume coming through here.
    They had to clean the wreck up first, and the poor young girl at the counter had no help from the outside
    except someone at the Altoona Railroad Museum in town who had no first hand knowledge of the wreck either !
  2. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    So, for $7.28 we get to avoid walking up all these steps.

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    And take this interesting looking cube up the side of the hill.

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    I have no idea what they call this, but it takes one car up this track while one comes down and they pass at that split area.

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    The inside of the car is pretty plain, but nice.

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    Perhaps I should have taken the stairs ! :huh

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    :lol3

    OK, one is coming down while we go up.

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    Like two cubes passing in the night.

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    I could not figure out how these stayed on track when the X was solid ! :scratch

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    Our destination.

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    And looking back down.
    The visitor center is to the left, the building to the right we came out of also houses a museum.

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  3. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    This is looking back down the valley.
    The rail lines come along the left and right sides of this valley and the curve is behind me.

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    The north side of the curve which heads east.

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    You can see my pointers of where the tracks are.
    Like I said, you can not see the tracks coming to and from the curve.

    The south side of the curve which heads west.

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    Some tourists who wanted their picture taken.

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    The only train engine we saw at Horseshoe Curve.

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    :lol3

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    This is some of what we might have seen on any other day !

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    This is a map of the area.
    The train wreck was off to the right about 8 miles from the curve.

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    This is about all you can see of the curve from here.
    I could not even tell you how many tracks run through here from this angle.

    According to the aerial view there are 3 rails that go through here.
    Well technically there are 6 rails making up 3 tracks ! :deal

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    And that my friends is The Horseshoe Curve Apocalypse ! :rofl

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  4. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    So we walk back down the stairs and check out the museum.

    This sign use to be on the road we came in on along the lake.

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    This is a 3D topographical map inside the museum that gives some perspective of what they accomplished here.
    The black line is the rail line.
    Horseshoe Curve is to the lower left.
    You can see how the rail line snakes along the edges of the mountains creeping ever so slightly upwards to get over these natural obstructions.

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    I never realized how much work it took to maintain this area.
    I thought, wow, a curve, that's nice !
    But the sharpness of this curve made for some harsh conditions for trains coming through here.

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    When I read that the rails here would wear out in 10 months while the same rails on a straight
    section of track could last up to 20 years I saw how unique this engineering feet was.

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    A worn rail.

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    Just in case you were curious about rail anchors like I was.

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    One of the entrances to the museum.

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    There is also a museum in the town of Altoona.
    You could pay for both here or there.
    We did not have time for that on this trip

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    Would you believe this entire section was built using manual labor and horse drawn equipment? No machines were in use at the time !
    It took 3 years to complete.
    They dug out the line and filled in at least two big ravines to make the curve.

    Horseshoe Curve on Wikipedia, with some cool pictures of the curve.

    Railroaders Memorial Museum website.
    At the curve the increase in elevation is 122 feet over 2375 feet of track.
    That's a lot for a train.
    And that is just right at the curve.
    I am sure the approaches would have the same or greater elevation changes.

    The Cube Car, as I call it, that goes up the hill is actually called the Funicular ! :lol3

    The Fort Wayne Railroad Historical Society is a Scenic Railway that runs through Horseshoe Curve.

    And some Rail Fan pictures on North East Rails.

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    PA, Altoona, Horseshoe Curve @14
  5. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    Yes, I wanted to see some trains.

    Some of the people that came here drove 3 1/2 hours.
    I have ridden for 7 days to get here !:lol3

    We had been hearing and asking questions about the wreck.
    It sounded like it would be a while for it to be cleaned up.
    We had a location of 17th Street and 10th Avenue.
    So which was it?
    Or was it 7 streets long?

    Well, 17th Street kind of goes from NW to SE, and 10th Avenue goes NE to SW.
    So they do cross !

    People were saying there was a crowd on the 17th Street Bridge.
    My wife said she had never seen a train wreck before !
    So we decided to see it for ourselves, beings we were not seeing any trains here !

    This is 17th Street bridge viewed from 12th Avenue.

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    We parked to the left along 10th Avenue in an empty parking lot and walked up the stairs to the bridge.

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    Yup, that's a train wreck !

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    And it is covering all of the tracks leading to Horseshoe Curve.

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    This is the engine side of the train.

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    So knowing this was the front this train had just come through the curve.

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    The whole train was car carriers.


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    I was not sure if there were automobiles in there or not.
    A quick peek through what little opening there was revealed there were cars on there.

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    We road around looking for some different angles, but the police had blocked everything off.

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    I had seen one news report that one guys car that was parked along the tracks got crushed, and now I can see how that would happen.

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    It was the biggest attraction in town !
    On the bridge there were people coming in motorized wheel chairs.
    There was a Cub Scout Troop there checking it out.
    And of course there were TV reporters down by the tracks.

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    And that was the train wreck of September 20th, 2014 in Altoona, PA.

    Here is a local news report from 6 WJAC.

    There are several YouTube videos.

    Norfolk Southern Derailment in Altoona with some nice closer pictures.

    Derailed Car Carrier Clean-up - Altoona, PA

    Autorack Train Derailment in Altoona, PA, again, a little long, but interesting.
    There is a part 2 also.

    Altoona Train Derailment One Week Later
    Just move it out of the way !
    They show the automobiles pulled out of the wreckage too, LOTS and LOTS of them !!!
    It is a little long, but you get the idea !

    There are more if you want to look at them.

    The accident happened about 8:00 AM and at Noon the next day they finally had one rail open so rail traffic could get through.

    This is a MAJOR route for Norfolk Southern.

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    PA, Altoona, Train Wreck Site @14
  6. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    The train wreck clean up process was going pretty slow while we were there so we headed off to our next destination.

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    I had never heard of the Allegheny Portage Railroad before.
    During it's time it was an engineering marvel.

    Unfortunately it did not last very long because of Locomotive technology.
    The Pennsylvania Railroad Horseshoe Curve we had just visited put this system out of business.

    What exactly is a Portage Railroad?
    Basically in the late 1820's canals were being built to transport goods and people long distances.
    The Erie Canal was finished in 1825 and made New York City and it's ports even more important.
    Philadelphia decided they needed a canal system, so they built one gong from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh.
    The only problem was the Allegheny Mountains in the middle of the state.

    Hence the Portage Railroad.
    Originally they would unload the canal boats onto railroad cars and pull them with horses across flatter areas
    and when they got to these inclines they had a continuous rope loop to move the cars up and down the inclines.
    There were 10 of these on this route.
    This is the only one that shows what these inclines looked like and the equipment used to do it.

    So, first stop was once again the Museum and Visitor Center.
    And $4 per person !

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    With advances in technology the horses were replaced with primitive steam engines for the flat areas.

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    This picture shows the basic layout at Incline Plain #6 that we were at.
    The cars were pulled up the hill behind the shed in the middle.
    Inside the shed was a steam boiler, stationary steam engine and the cogs and pulleys for the tow rope.
    More on that later.
    The cars would then be hooked to the train, in this case, and taken to the next incline.

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    A map of the 36 miles the railroad covered.
    We are at number 6 on this map.
    This is also the highest point on the railroad.

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    The two systems used for tracks are seen here.
    The stone sleepers and rails were used on the level areas.
    The wood beam and flat steel were used on the inclines and wood ties were used instead of the stone.

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    This shows the earliest system used on the level areas.
    You can see the reason for the stone sleepers instead of railroad ties.
    It was much easier for the horses to walk on flat ground instead of over wood ties.

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    A canal boat model.

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    The labor and time involved in unloading and then reloading everything at each end was relieved by these fancy sectional barges.
    They would float these onto railroad cars an them pull the whole thing up and over the mountains.

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    This is, as far as I have been able to figure out, a replica of the steam locomotives used on the Allegheny Portage Railroad.

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    This one is called the Lafeyette.
    The originals were originally built starting in 1832 and this model was used extensively on American Railroads by 1840.
    Hundreds of these were built by Norris Locomotive Works in Philadelphia and some were even shipped around the world.

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    Artifacts from the railroad.

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    I did not realize how interconnected my trip was until I got home.

    The original system of pulling the cars up and down the inclines used 3 1/2 inch hemp rope.
    That was replaced by John Roebling's Steel Cables !

    Remember that place ?
    This piece of cable would have been made in Saxonburg, PA.

    Also note in this picture that the cable used here is thicker than the ones used in the Brooklyn Bridge !
    The cables used here were constantly in motion.

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    There were quite a few other engineering feats made along the way as well.

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    Including Staple Bend Tunnel, which is considered the First Railroad Tunnel in the United States at it's completion in 1833 and was 901 feet long.

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    This is about 5 miles away and I considered visiting it, but time did not allow for that.
    Plus it is a two (2) mile walk from the parking area to the tunnel !!!!!!
    That was the deal breaker ! :lol3

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  7. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    Out of the museum you walk down this nice pathway to the incline area.

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    This is a replica Engine House.
    It is actually bigger than the original because this not only houses the replica machinery, but also preserves the original foundation.

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    The rails would have continued down the hill and off on a level area to the next incline.

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    At the bottom of this incline is the Skew Arch Bridge that carried the Huntingdon, Cambria and Indiana Turnpike Road over the railway.

    We did not make it down there either.

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    Inside the shed is a nice reproduction of the original engines and gears and pulleys used in this system.

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    It is a little hard to explain, but the rope is a continuous rope and they used the counter weight
    of cars going up and down together to relieve the necessity of higher powered engines.

    The big horizontal pulley had a counterweight attached to keep the slack out of the rope.
    The counterweight is in the hole in the picture below.

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    Looking back toward the incline.

    The only parts that would have been visible when this was working would be the rail, rope and top of the large wheel.
    Everything else was below floor level.

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    The thing in the back represents one of the boilers that provided steam to the engine.

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    This is the original foundation for Incline Plane #6 Engine House.
    You can see other parts in some of the other pictures too.

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    These samples of the rope and cable makes you realize what they were working with.
    Rope of course has it's durability issues, especially when dragged along the ground and stretched this much.
    The steel cable was much more durable.

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    And the ropes did break when worn out.
    Created quite a mess at the bottom of the hill !

    This is the rail system on the flat leading to Incline Plain #5.

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    Some more information and pictures on the Engine House on National Park Planner.

    More information and a picture of the original foundation before the replica building was built on NPS Allegheny Portage Railroad.

    The Portage section of the canal began on the east at Hollidaysburg, PA.
    The western section began at Johnstown.
    If you remember the Johnstown Flood of 1889, the dam that broke was the one built to feed water to the western section of the canal.

    The cana,l by the way, was not a continuous one from Philadelphia to Hollidaysburg.
    There was a Schuylkill Canal with an offshoot of the Union Canal which led to the Susquehanna River. Up river the Juniata Division led to Hollidaysburg.
    The Western Division went from Johnstown to Pittsburgh.

    The entire system from Philadelphia to PIttsburgh was called the Main Line Canal System and covered 358 miles and took 5 days to complete.
    Much faster than could be done otherwise.

    Mail Line of Public Works on Wikipedia.

    A concise history on EXplorePAhistory.com

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  8. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    At the summit just west of the Engine House is the Lemon House.

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    Built originally by Samuel Lemon to take advantage of the new railway as well as the Turnpike road that passed here also.
    He made quite a living here in Llilly, PA.
    He not only provided lodging, food and goods, he also dug himself a coal mine in the nearby hill and sold coal to the Engine House to use in their boiler !

    You enter into the Central Hallway.

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    In the back left is a Fancy Parlor and Private Dinning Room.

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    Samuel Lemon's grandfather served under George Washington in the Revolutionary War.

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    The Double Dinning Room.
    Looks like you could sit down today and get served a good meal !

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    A picture taken around 1900 of the Lemon House.

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    This sign about the railway section I found pretty interesting.
    I wondered how they could attack metal rails to stone like this.

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    One of the sleepers on our way back to the parking lot.
    The road traveling through the park at the Engine House was the original road into the park.
    That has been closed off at William Penn Highway, old US-22, even though every map tries to take you in that way.
    The new entrance has it's own exit off US-22. The Galitzin Exit onto Tunnelhill Street.

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    And we are back at the Visitor Center and parking lot.

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    Allegheny Portage Railroad on NPS.

    Wikipedia

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    PA, Gallitzin, Allegheny Portage Railroad, Engine House #6 @14
  9. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    This is where my Perry vs Peary confusion comes in !

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    If you remember, Oliver Hazard Perry was in the War of 1812.

    This Rear Admiral Robert Edwin Peary was also in the Navy, but almost 70 years later.

    I know the names are not spelled the same, so it must have been a mental block !

    But, I had the Navy part right anyway ! :lol3

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    This nice clean park is mostly grass except for some tree lines and the Peary statue.

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    This is a unique statue.
    It has muffled detail.
    And I am pretty sure it was made like this.

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    As you can see, this Peary is considered the founder of the North Pole.

    Not exactly sure what WPA 1937 means.

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    It probably refers to the Work Progress Administration founded around 1935.
    It was a New Deal agency that did projects like this.
    Kind of like the Civilian Conservation Corps Workers.

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    Can't survive in the Arctic without one of these !

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    Or a big mustache ! :rofl

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    Made by sculptor Joseph Pollia.

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    This sign was by the main road.

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    Like I said, it is a nice park, just not much here.
    But this is a fine piece of history.
    I thought I had read that Robert Peary was born on or very near this spot in Cresson, PA.

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    And back to our bike.

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    This was our/my last official stop on this ride.

    It was kind of a let down, and a relief to have gotten this far and knowing the end was near was bitter sweet.

    Robert Peary on Wikipedia.

    Robert Edwin Peary on bio.

    Robert Peary, To the Top of the World, Alone on the Ice on PBS.

    Naval History and Heritage Command, Biographies in Naval History, which has some nice old photographs.

    Eyewitness to History .com has a voice recording of Peary describing his planting the American Flag on the North Pole.

    Here is a short biography with some other pictures on Garden of Praise.

    I Googled Robert Peary arctic expedition photographs and there are quite a lot of them.
    Interesting history lesson right in the pictures. :evil

    Some of Joseph Pollia's other works on Smithsonian Institution.

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    PA, Cresson, Admiral Robert Edwin Peary statue @14
  10. STBNE

    STBNE Southern Comfort

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    Steve are you sure you aren't a History teacher?:wink:. I thoroughly enjoy your most informative narration and photo documentation...I love railroads and steam locomotives.
    I find this even more enjoyable than following the Docgonzo show on the TORS...It seems alot of folks that used to play those games have quit for one reason or another...and who is still playing everyday...I'll give him credit for getting out there but it seems like maybe its getting a little long in the tooth...so to say...IDK...:dunno
    Its also good to see that the Trophy has been fine running machine too...you might want to invest in a small trailer to take all that top heavy stuff off the bike.:deal
    Now I'll go back and explore some of those links you provided as theres alot to read...Thanks again...:freaky
  11. enormiss

    enormiss Been here awhile

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    Yep Ben, gives me new perspective to walking the tow path and fishing the canal in Phila years ago.
    Thanks Teach :D
  12. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    History was not my favorite subject in school.
    All those dates and people that meant nothing to me.....then !
    When I see how much is interconnected through history it makes it a lot more interesting, especially local history.

    I learned a lot on this trip and I did not realize how many of my stops were interconnected.

    - Drake used an engine he bought in Erie, PA for his oil well.
    - America's oldest gas station goes well with Drake's Well also.
    - Roebling Steel Cables I did not realize were first made in Pennsylvania. His name carries on in New Jersey at Roebling, NJ.
    - Roebling's Steel Cables were used at the Inclines of the Allegheny Portage Railroad.
    They were also used in suspension bridges and viaducts along other parts of the canal.
    - Horseshoe Curve put the Allegheny Portage Railroad out of business, and the canals along with it.
    - Robert Peary has ties to Camden, NJ. His right hand man Matthew Henson lived there for a time and there is a statue of him commemorating his achievements.
    "This interest stems from the fact that both Robert Peary and Matthew Henson lived and
    worked locally and that local scientific institutions sponsored their famous Greenland expedition
    of 1891. Moreover, one of the buildings housing the Museum was constructed using ballast stones
    brought from Greenland in their ship the “Kite” after these explorations."
    from Camden Shipyard & Maritime Museum.
    A place I have on my list to go see. :D

    I looked up the Norris Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, but all of their facilities, and also the Baldwin
    Locomotive Works next door, are all gone. The third U.S. Mint is located on part of their property.

    And the Triumph Trophy handled admirably on this trip as well.
    Yes the bike is more top heavy than usual, but actually most of the weight is in the side bags.
    Most of what is on top is clothes and such. I am also not sure I want to tow a trailer with a motorcycle.
    I know it is done, but I will have to think about that some more.

    I am glad you are enjoying my ride report.
    I was beginning to wonder if anyone was still reading it ! :eyes
  13. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    No problem enormiss ! :lol3

    I am glad you are enjoying reading this.

    Those canals were important back in their day.
    Now the fish, and fishermen, love them !
  14. STBNE

    STBNE Southern Comfort

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    Cool beans Steve...my fondest memories riding my bikes were along the Delaware River and the Delaware-Raritan canal system on both NJ and PA sides of he river. I too hadnt much interest in History as a student but like you have said so well...seeing how it connects to the present brings it into focus better. Finally the view and appreciation for the visual world around us is further enhanced as motorcylists who are more in tune with their surroundings...Ride on my friend...:clap
  15. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    Seeing Admiral Peary and remembering his Cold Arctic Adventures we decided to stop here and get some frozen vegetables !

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    :rofl

    We needed to pick up a few things to round out our last meal on the road that my wife had brought.

    I noticed some wear a little further out on my tires than I am use to seeing in New Jersey !

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    :D

    When we got back to camp we had only done 90 miles.
    But we did get to see some interesting stuff.
    And the roads in the area were pretty nice.

    While my wife was preparing dinner I took a walk around Prince Gallitzin State Park.

    The lake is pretty extensive.

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    They have several kinds of hook up sites for campers and a few cabins also.

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    A little visitor who I am sure is a permanent resident.

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    Our camp on our last night.

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    When I looked down at my dinner,..... It was looking back at me ! :eek1

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    :lol3
  16. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

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    The next morning was our trip home.

    It was overcast and we actually hit some rain close to camp, but fortunately it was only sprikles.

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    We road to another Sheetz gas station and got gas and breakfast.
    They make it so simple to do.
    Plus we were out of food anyway.

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    We were heading back over the mountains to the flat lands of home.

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    We road through this big valley called Big Valley.

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    There are a lot of Amish people living here and the farms are extensive.
    The town in the middle is called Belleville.
    If you get a chance, this is a nice scenic ride.
    Very straight, but nice scenery.

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    We ended our ride through big valley at US-322, so we got on there and kept heading east.

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    My one planned stop was in Mifflintown to see a Muffler Man.
    He was located at a High School, but I could not find him anywhere.
    His name is Chief Merrill and he was at Juniata Senior High School.

    Oh well, keep riding.

    We were taking US-22 at this point and I was trying to get around Harrisburg, PA with as little fuss as possible.

    The road took us along the Susquehanna River.
    We did see a Statue of Liberty out there, but with traffic and not much shoulder we did not bother stopping.
    If I had known it was there before my trip I might have made a stop of it.
    It is not visible in this picture.

    I looked it up and Roadside America has it listed as Dauphin Narrows Statue of Liberty in Dauphin, PA.

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    I had to make one stop before we got to Lancaster, PA.
    Between needing a bathroom and a butt break I was looking forward to that ! :lol3

    Through Lancaster and past the Gap, PA clock tower.

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    The closer we get to home the more boring the roads become, except for the traffic.
    Boredom sets in and trying to keep awake becomes difficult.

    Over the River and Through the.... well, ... flatlands of NJ we road.

    And that ever pleasant welcoming sign we see.

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    Up I-295 we ride and get off onto NJ-73 and stop for dinner, or a late lunch.

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    And beings this was a Sunday we sat around a little and waited for our once a month evening service at church.

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    Yea, we are a small church, but their dedication to the Lord is a big comfort and encouragement.

    We attend Northgate Fellowship and we meet at Evans Elementary School in Marlton, NJ.

    After church we of course go home and unload our stuff.

    We had ridden 280 miles on our last day with minimal stops.

    Our total trip came out to 1,390 miles.

    Not bad for basically riding around in one state !

    Although I must say, Pennsylvania is quite interesting and nice to ride around in.

    And thus ended our latest adventure.

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    PA, Belleville, Big Valley @14
  17. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,812
    Location:
    Souff Jersee
    Our next BIG ADVENTURE is being grandparents to this cutie.

    I would like you to meet EMMA.
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    I don't know who the old people are in this picture, but they were enjoying the new addition to the family.

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    3 days old after getting home from the hospital.
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    At 1 Month old.
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    She reminds me of our son when he was a baby.
    So attentive and aware of her surroundings.

    She seems so happy in these pictures, which she is, but every time I see here she is sleeping ! :snore

    :lol3

    Here she is at 2 Months old.
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    And thus begins our journey as grandparents.

    This is one of the reasons I keep up with posting our motorcycle rides.
    Someday she will be able to look at this and see where her grandparents have been.
    How crazy her grandfather was.
    His bad sense of humor.
    His weird attraction to roadside oddities and all things weird and goofy !

    A little bit of my history for her to see who I am at this point in my life.

    I hope you know how much Gigi and I love you Emma.
  18. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,812
    Location:
    Souff Jersee
    So, about a month after we got back from our Erie, PA trip I had BRUCE RUN V set up.
    That is the ride where we visit places used in the Garden State Tag-O-Rama games here on ADV.
    And this was our fifth ride, hence the Roman Numeral "V" !
    Hard to believe we have done that many rides seeing stuff in New Jersey.
    #1 was a ride up US-206 starting in Princeton, NJ.
    #2 was a ride up along the Delaware River starting in Frenchtown, NJ.
    #3 was a ride down along the Hudson River with a starting location of Paterson, NJ.
    #4 was a ride through Bergen and Passaic Counties.
    #5 was this ride in the center of the state to see things that may not be around much longer.

    There have been several places I had wanted to visit but are now gone for one reason or another, so that prompted me to set this ride up for these locations.

    Interest seemed a little light for this ride, but that is OK with me.
    These are places I had been wanting to see, and if anyone wanted to go along that just added to the fun of the trip.

    So we start out on October 18, 2014 at 6:40 AM.

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    This is the latest we had ever started because this was the furthest south we have ever started.
    Normally we have to leave at 4 or 5 in the morning !
    Plus this bike is a little faster than the PC ! :evil

    And this was my first Bruce Run with the new bike. :ricky

    Our ride up to Wall Township, NJ was pretty quiet and peaceful.
    We arrived at one of our locally famous WAWA stores.
    This one was in Wall Township, NJ.

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    Fill with gas.
    Empty the bladder.
    Gather whoever is there.
    And ride.

    This was my lone participant that started the ride with me and my wife.
    yumerider.

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    Our first stop was pretty close.
    An Auto Parts Art Dinosaur I somehow missed !

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    This piece of art is located at the Roadside Diner.

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    Pretty nice piece of art along NJ-34.

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    The Roadside Diner was formerly named the Circle Diner and also Rusty's.

    The diner is a 1940's Silk City Diner.

    It has some nice New Jersey ties (besides being made in NJ) because it was used in the 1983 movie "Baby It's You"
    It was also used on the cover of the 1994 Bon Jovi album "Cross Road: 14 Classic Grooves"
    And was also seen in the 2008 music video "Girls in Their Summer Clothes" by Bruce Springsteen.

    Both Springsteen and Bon Jovie hail from New Jersey by the way.
    I have their boyhood homes on my list of things to see.

    Roadside Diner website.

    Here is a nice video on YouTube put out by The National Herald.

    The Dinosaur Sculpture was created by Jim Gary.
    He also made the Pink Brontosaurus Sculpture I posted on page 45 down on post 670.

    How it got here who knows !
    But this is one of the last, or maybe the last, sculpture of Jim Gary's left in New Jersey.
    The rest of his creations were moved to the Tallahassee Museum in Florida.

    Someone in the TOR game gave it the name Diner-saur. :lol3

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    #895 Diner-saur

    Diner-saur at Roadside Diner @14
  19. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,812
    Location:
    Souff Jersee
    Our next stop was a little tricky getting to.

    There was construction on the bridge we were going to see and the next one west of it, and we were coming in that way.

    But I found a way around and we got as close as we could.

    This dock, as unsafe as it looks, was a good viewing spot for the bridge on the left.

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    This is the Glimmer Glass Drawbridge in Brielle, NJ.

    It is a Cable Lift Bascule Bridge using a counterweight deisgn built in 1898, and still in use today.

    The rollers are the counterweights.

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    This is looking up the Manasquan River.

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    This bench did not appear to comforting to me, plus I had no time to sit anyway, fortunately !

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    This is what we saw coming up after our detour.
    We are parked on the right in a small parking area.

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    And the road, complete with obstacle course, we came in on.

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    I had planned on going out onto the bridge, but with the construction they closed the whole thing off, as this sign nicely states !

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    It appears that that one smallish green motor on the top left is all that raises and lowers this bridge.
    The cable wraps around the pulley at the top and is attached to the bridge on one end and the counterweights on the other.
    Pretty simple design.

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    It looked like the construction was on the approaches and not on the bridge itself.
    The green pilings you see are all new.

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    The marina next to the bridge has some fancy flotation device$ docked there.

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    I guess the lower class boats are discouraged !

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    :lol3

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    I liked the name on this boat.

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    Remind you of anybody ?

    The Glimmer Glass Bridge spans from Manasquan to Brielle over the Manasquan River.
    The bridge was modernized in 1957 but maintains the integrity of the original design and operation.
    It is 279 feet long, 20 feet wide, with 17 spans (I am not sure where they get 17 spans from).
    It is said to be the only example of this late 19th century bridge type in NJ and possible the U.S.
    The design was originally French in origin.

    When I saw the construction going on I thought maybe they were replacing this old span.
    Hence my urgency to get out and see some of these old things and places.

    Glimmer Glass Bridge on Wikipedia, which states that there were some repairs to be made to the decking of the bridge due to an overweight vehicle crossing it.
    They also state that there is talk of replacing the bridge because of its age.

    Here is a nice aerial view with the bridge, seen in the lower left corner of the picture, on NJ.com.

    Another article about the possible replacing of this bridge and a little more history and some pictures.

    This stop is the first, and only so far, previous Tag from the South Jersey Tag-O-Rama game.

    Here is a short YouTube video showing the bridge going up, but the view is from the
    roadway and not the side, but you can see the counterweights moving on their track.

    The name Glimmer Glass comes from the inlet here at the bridge.

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    SJT 538 Glimmer Glass Pass

    Glimmer Glass Drawbridge @14
  20. PC-Rider

    PC-Rider venturer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,812
    Location:
    Souff Jersee
    Our next stop is a shell of it's former self.

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    Literally, all that is left of this 1888 Carousel is the building.
    And I am not totally sure the building is original.
    This was part of Palace Amusements in Asbury Park, NJ.

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    I am not sure how they found this attractive, even in 1888 ! :dunno

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    There are lights in the ornamentation along the roof edge.

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    The inside.

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    Next door was another old looking building.

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    This was the Palace Amusement Carousel.

    It has a storied past in that it has gone through several fires.

    The original carousel had 3 rows of hand carved animals from poplar and other hard woods produced by Charles I.D. Looff in 1888.
    In 1910 a fire destroyed most of the original animals.
    The carousel was rebuilt by William Mangels.
    Later the carousel was made into 4 rows of animals by Marcus Charles Illions.
    Another fire in 1942 destroyed 14 animals and they were replaced with some from Revere Beach, Mass.
    Palace Amusements closed in 1988, 100 years after it opened.
    Demolished in 2004 but interior parts were sold off.

    That last part is what I am not sure of.
    What was demolished in 2004?
    You can see the interior was sold off ! :wink:

    NJ.com has a 2014 article titled "Asbury Park's Palace carousel listed on eBay for $250K".
    The article gives some history of this carousel.

    Here is a YouTube video from a 1977 home movie.
    Not great, but it is better than nothing !

    Another YouTube video named "Asburied ...an Asbury Park memoir".
    It shows this building around 1:18, but most of the video is current footage with some old photos shown also.

    Information about Palace Amusements on Wikipedia, with some old photographs.

    Historical information about Palace Amusements on Palace Museum Online.
    Click on "Enter the Museum" under the name and then "The Carousel" on the left.

    Bruce Sprinsteen made some footage riding on the carousel in 1987 for the "Tunnel of Love" video, but the footage never appeared in the video.

    This was an early Tag in the Garden State Tag-O-Rama game.

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    #9 Palace Carousel

    Palace Amusements Carousel @14