Pegboard Instead of Drywall?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by MotorcycleWriter, Aug 23, 2019.

  1. MotorcycleWriter

    MotorcycleWriter Vis ad locum

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    The interior walls of my garage are unfinished drywall. The portion that are the walls of the living space are insulated. The other two walls are not. With a long, cold winter on the way I'd like to insulate those two walls so I can heat the garage and work out there.

    I'm thinking of pulling down the sheet rock, putting up insulation, and going back over the studs with a layer of plastic sheeting and then pegboard. The layer of plastic will provide a vapor barrier and discourage insects from making homes behind the pegboard.

    Is there any reason that putting pegboard over studs is a bad idea, or why I'd want to do drywall and then pegboard? I can't think of one but I'm not a builder and might be missing something obvious. Or not-so-obvious.
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  2. MotoChris521

    MotoChris521 expert apprentice

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    Because drywall is fire retardant?
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  3. MotorcycleWriter

    MotorcycleWriter Vis ad locum

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    Could be a code issue then. Good point.
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  4. roger123

    roger123 Long timer Supporter

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    I covered my entire garage with white pegboard. The exterior walls were bare studs with inslation. The wall that is common with the house has drywall, I'm assuming it's fire-retardant.

    I like the PB as youy can use the hooks or drive nails/ screws into the studs as needed.
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  5. usgser

    usgser Long timer

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    Before you decide. Check with your home owners ins co.
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  6. MacNoob

    MacNoob piney fresh

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    If you put the pegboard directly over the vapour barrier, you might punch holes in it when you insert pegs.
    Pegboard is a lot more expensive than drywall.
    If you put pegboard over drywall, you'll need to space it out so you can insert the pegs.
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  7. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism!

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    I have finished a few garages. The walls need to breath or they will collect moisture. Make sure you don't have a double barrier. Of course consider the fire code. But this was always a surprise. Once insulated, when it gets cold soaked, it stays cold and becomes very hard to heat. So you will need to keep it warm.
    You could always fur out from the drywall, and hang the peg board on the furing strips. Its nice to have peg board walls to hang stuff on. It stays cleaner as well, and some gloss white paint really adds to the lighting for a shop.
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  8. ericm

    ericm Long timer

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    In some locations they recommend a vapor barrier on the inside side and a vapor permeable layer like tyvek on the outer side. It depends on your climate.

    I'll second painting the drywall making the room brighter.
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  9. muddywater

    muddywater Bless Your Heart

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    Drywall then fur walls out 3/4 for pegboard as previously stated for hanger clearance.

    Put the peg where you need it. Pegboard everywhere is proably overkill and much of it won't be used.
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  10. gonerydin

    gonerydin Been here awhile

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    Maybe you can get foam insulation installed under the existing sheet rock.
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  11. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

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    I'd put up drywall, tape it but you certainly don't have to be extra good with the feathering in, and then mount pegboard using pegboard screw anchors. They are plastic screw anchors with a spacer built in, so the pegboard sits 3/8 or 1/2 inch off the wallboard.
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  12. pnhd65

    pnhd65 renaissance man

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    You made no mention of what's on your ceiling. If it's not insulated and sheathed with something, doing anything to the walls is moot.

    Since you've got to pull drywall off anyhow, do the job right and just be done with it. IE, DON'T COVER THIS WITH PEGBOARD! It will be nothing but a filthy mess. Nothing but holes to fill with dust and bug shit.

    My suggestion is pull the sheetrock off. If the walls that are currently insulated are in good shape, leave it and just tape and paint.

    Take care of any electrical issues or wants. Insulate walls and ceiling, cheapest and easiest for a DIYer is kraft faced fiberglass. Cover walls with OSB, paint prior to installation, also paint edges. You can do this all with a roller. Kilz makes an OIL based primer, white can, labelled 'original formula', that will seal OSB. After panels are put up, caulk seams, recommend ALEX Plus, then final paint.

    Is metal roofing available in your area? If so, install white 'liner panel' on ceiling with a 'J' channel around the perimeter for trim. If you can't source, I'd just sheetrock the ceiling.

    Hope this helps, good luck on your project.


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  13. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Much depends on how the space will be used and if or what dust might be created,etc.. I am a woodworker and have some pegboard in certain places but it does act as a dust collection device. Mud daubers/wasps, etc. like to build behind it and if your tools or brackets have much weight on them you have to use the heavier weights or it just busts out at the holes. The more you fur it out the more holes you block and the less utility it provides!
    I've found it useful but also a minor PITA solution. I'm old enough to have accumulated scads of various pegboard thingies that no longer have a use in this world.
    My shop is a dedicated building 150 yds from my house and has zero sheetrock inside.
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  14. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Regardless of putting up/leaving up dry wall and spacing out, to save some money on the project, only put a 4 foot strip of peg board around the garage walls. I put a band of hard 4x8' hard board sideways, around the base of my garage, then put a 2 x 3/4" band of wood with a kerf at the top to the inside to fit the 4x8' peg board I put above the trim strip. plain hard board is cheap.

    If putting up dry wall a similar set up could be used put a strip around 4' off the floor to hold the peg board up at that level. No sense in having peg board down so low it is useless.
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  15. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Here studs must be covered with sheetrock.

    We have a range of loose fill insulants that can be blown in. Most are considered "green" or "eco" which some place may get a discount or payback.

    Having worked in places with pegboard sheathed walls, it soon got dirty and no amount of painting got it looking clean again. And painting it is a PIA
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  16. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    Part of the "clean" thing is if you want your wall to look nice or hold stuff. Now if you have a lot of money you can go with the slot wall, the display wall used in stores - but fittings for the slots ain't cheap. Looks killer, but costs a lot. Then there is peg board. It may eventually look dirty, but is it there to look good or hold tools, etc for you? That is the question.

    I'll paint it when I decide to sell the house.
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  17. mike in idaho

    mike in idaho Been here awhile

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    I put several sheets of 1/4 inch pegboard above the work bench areas, over existing drywall, hung on 3/4 inch furring strips. Great place to hang oddball shaped stuff to relieve clutter.
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  18. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    I did two walls in peg board over insulation. The house side is fire code drywall and the garage door end is also drywall.

    On the plus side: bright white is nice, it's really easy to install with almost no finish work and it really is handy for storing all kinds of crap.

    The minus side is the material is basically crap. It is really easy to gouge and hole. I can't think of anything else I don't like about it. Like I said, it's handy.

    I could care less whether it meets code. My garage is already in violation for removing the self slamming fire door that was the world's largest pain in our ass.

    That said, if the walls are already done, I would talk to an insulation contractor. I would want to compare the time and cost of redoing it vs. blowing insulation behind it.
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  19. MotorcycleWriter

    MotorcycleWriter Vis ad locum

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    Got it started today. Put more plugs in the two insulated walls. It's not a hard job but it goes slow. I generally get crappy results cutting long, narrow pieces of drywall with a box knife so I'm using one of those vibrating saws. It's slow but pretty accurate. IMG_1529.JPG

    IMG_1530.JPG
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  20. pnhd65

    pnhd65 renaissance man

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    Good for you. Keep at it.
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