PennyTech shop/garage improvements

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Ricardo Kuhn, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. mark1150

    mark1150 Been here awhile

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    Awesome thread and work there guys, unfortunately for the purposes of this thread my pennytech aka Pooratech stuff has been limited to the bikes.
    #21
  2. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    Will see where it goes if people post their own ideas
    This is my first one too, before I use to make everything in my little studio, sometimes even in the bathroom..
    #22
  3. murder face

    murder face Adventurer

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    Nice topic! thanks for posting up. I'm saving a spot for my ideas/creations. Keep the idea's going!
    #23
  4. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    If everybody acts the same way this posting is destine for certain death..:deal
    #24
  5. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    Okay here is another one that fits into "Garage theme"

    Very pennytech "bike lift", well table..

    The idea is that you load the bike on the lift like this and then use a "Car jack" to lift the rear end until the table is horizontal or you can just use a ramp to load it up, even if is pretty step.
    [​IMG]

    Very Simple to make, mostlly out of 4x4 plus a small piece of 1/2" plywood..
    I'm a pretty bad carpenter but you get the idea, everything is made on a "Interface" level, so the glue and screws are secondary.
    [​IMG]

    fully erect
    [​IMG]

    It holds the Big Pig just fine..
    [​IMG]

    Only improvement it needs in my opinion is a "real" wheel holder, because is a pain to strap the handlebars by your self (but it can be done)

    Okay for now I'm out of trick, so please share your if you want to keep this topic going, or at least say something interesting..

    Oh more Pictures HERE
    #25
  6. huzar

    huzar Pastor of Muppets

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    How do you lift the table? With a car jack?
    #26
  7. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    Yeah I just edit the post
    #27
  8. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    This is a Great resource full of great ideas but very little PennyTeck, still inspirational.
    #28
  9. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    Home made penny tech chain whip/preload aduster.

    Old bike chain and scrap steel.

    [​IMG]
    #29
  10. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    How did you cut the hole so nicely..?

    Jigsaw..?
    #30
  11. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    Angle grinder with cutoff wheel. About a 5 minute job.
    #31
  12. Ricardo Kuhn

    Ricardo Kuhn a.k.a. Mr Rico Suave

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    Wow dude you are good..:huh
    #32
  13. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    Thanks :bow

    I might have hit it with the file a little bit too.
    #33
  14. anonny

    anonny What could go wrong?

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    Above where you normally park your bike to work on it, or above your lift (if you are lucky enough to have one) suspend an extension cord with multiple outlets. Keep it above your head height but within arms reach, so when you need to solder, heatshrink or charge a battery... the power is right there.
    #34
  15. Jayrod1318

    Jayrod1318 Poster

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    Insulate then finish bare studs with OSB.

    Paint with cheap white primer.

    You stay warm, you can screw into walls anywhere for hooks and shelves, and the white primer makes your lighting equipment work for you.

    Old bathroom and kitchen cabinets make great storage options for free or low cost.

    Make shelves out of 1/2'' osb and 1x4's 1x2's and 2x4's.
    #35
  16. Duckworth

    Duckworth Taking the high road

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    We moved two years ago into a house with a fantastic - but unfinished garage; 2.5 car, super high ceilings, and even an unfinished studio apt. above. No insulation, bare studs. I was thinking of using OSB, but people keep telling me to use Sheetrock. I would prefer OSB for the reasons you said, and because it is easier for me to work with. What are the disadvantages vs. Sheetrock, aside from fire resistance?
    #36
  17. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    #37
  18. Jayrod1318

    Jayrod1318 Poster

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    it does soak up alot of primer.

    In hindsight sealing it with something first would be good and maybe less labor/ paint in the end.
    #38
  19. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    That's about it. If you do have a fire, your insurance co. may not cover you since you did something non-code. So seal-up the backs of the switch/outlet boxes with foam-in-a-can, put up the insulation (I'd use non-faced, overly-thick fiberglass batts - e.g., R-19 for a 2x4 wall; fit batts firmly together/against studs and encase wires; compress face with finished wall; loses a little R value than stated but adds more R value than typical for the wall & still real affordable), then cover with sheetrock for both air seal and fire code compliance (use glue along every stud/screws), finish-off sheetrock (tape/mud) and paint with a moisture barrier Latex paint. Then install some OSB on top of the sheetrock wherever you want to mount tools.
    FYI - insulate the ceiling (btwn the garage and "bonus room" floor) with polyisocyanurate foam boards cut to fit in the floor space. Seal any gaps/seams with foam-in-a-can. Much better R value but much less $ than commercial closed-cell spray foam.
    #39
  20. small_e_900

    small_e_900 Amanda carried it

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    Insulate the walls and then install 4" furring strips horizontally on 12" centers before installing drywall.

    You will never have to go more than 8" horizontally or 14 1/2" vertically (assumes 16 centers on studs) to find something solid to screw into.

    If the garage adjoins the living space, use 5/8", 1 hour fire rated drywall to keep the insurance man happy. This is only necessary where the two structures are attached to one another.
    #40